Three Rings (disambiguation)

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The Three Rings are fictional artifacts in Tolkien's legendarium.

In Tolkien's mythology, the Three Rings are magical artifacts forged by the Elves of Eregion. After the One Ring, they are the most powerful of the twenty Rings of Power.

Three Rings may also refer to:

Three Rings Design

Three Rings Design, Inc. was an online game developer that was founded on March 30, 2001 by Daniel James and Michael Bayne. The company was named in honor of the Three Rings of the Elven-kings in Tolkien mythology.

<i>Three Ringz</i> 2008 studio album by T-Pain

Three Ringz is the third studio album by American R&B recording artist T-Pain, It was released on November 11, 2008, by his record label Nappy Boy Entertainment. It was supported by three singles: "Can't Believe It" featuring Lil Wayne, "Chopped 'n' Skrewed" featuring Ludacris, and "Freeze" featuring Chris Brown.

Xbox 360 technical problems

The Xbox 360 video game console is subject to a number of technical problems and failures that can render it unusable. However, many of the issues can be identified by a series of glowing red lights flashing on the face of the console; the three flashing red lights being the most infamous. There are also other issues that arise with the console, such as discs becoming scratched in the drive and "bricking" of consoles due to dashboard updates. Since its release on November 22, 2005, many articles have appeared in the media portraying the Xbox 360's failure rates, with the latest estimate by warranty provider SquareTrade to be 23.7% in 2009, and currently the highest estimate being 54.2% by a Game Informer survey.

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