Threipland baronets

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Dr. Sir Stuart Threipland, de jure 3rd Baronet, of Fingask SirStuartdetail.jpg
Dr. Sir Stuart Threipland, de jure 3rd Baronet, of Fingask

The Threipland Baronetcy, of Fingask in the County of Perth, was a title in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia. It was created on 10 November 1687 for Patrick Threipland. The second Baronet was attainted in 1715 with the baronetcy forfeited. The de jure third Baronet was physician to Bonnie Prince Charlie during the Jacobite rising of 1745 and President of the Royal Medical Society from 1766 to 1770. In 1826 Patrick Murray Threipland obtained a reversal of the attainder and became the fourth Baronet. On the death of the fifth Baronet in 1882 the title became either extinct or dormant.

Contents

The family seat was Fingask Castle, Perthshire. [1]

Threipland baronets, of Fingask (1687)

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Stuart Threipland MD, FRCPE was a Scottish physician. He was the son of Sir David Threipland, the second baronet of Fingask and, like his father, was an active Jacobite. After qualifying MD from the University of Edinburgh in 1742 he became a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh (RCPE) two years later. In 1745 he joined Prince Charles Edward Stuart in the Jacobite rising. He became physician-in-chief to the prince and stayed with the army throughout the campaign. After the Jacobite defeat at Culloden in April 1746 he went into exile in France but was able to return to Scotland under the Act of Indemnity(1747). When his father died in 1746 he succeeded to become de jure the third baronet of Fingask but was technically unable to use the title which had been forfeited by his father because of his support for the Jacobite cause. He practised as a physician in Edinburgh and was elected President of the RCPE in 1766. In 1783 he was able to buy back most of the family estates in Fingask and Kinnaird which had been forfeited in 1715 because of his father's support for the Jacobite cause.

References

  1. Perth Post Office Directory 1860: List of Noblemen and Gentlemens Country Seats