Throwing It All Away (album)

Last updated
Throwing It All Away
Studio album by
Released15 March 2008
RecordedSouthfields, Rosslare, Co Wexford & Dublin.
Genre Rock
Length39:54
Label Cocklebob Recordings
Producer Colin Whelan, Conor O'Brien & Rob Smith
Rob Smith chronology
Throwing It All Away
(2008)
The Juliana Field
(2010)

Throwing It All Away is the debut album by Irish musician Rob Smith. It was released on 15 March 2008.

Track listing

  1. "Intro : The Jam"
  2. "One for the Modern"
  3. "Out In The Sunshine"
  4. "Stand Up"
  5. "Soul Shaker"
  6. "Interlude : La Mano de Dios"
  7. "(People) Come With Me"
  8. "So Many, So Near"
  9. "Laugh All The Way To Town"
  10. "When Your Feet Were Dancing"
  11. "Piano Tune"


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