Thruston

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Thruston is a surname and may refer to:

Buckner Thruston United States federal judge

Buckner Thruston was a Democratic-Republican U.S. Senator from Kentucky, and later a long-serving United States federal judge.

Charles Mynn Thruston was a soldier in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War.

Gates P. Thruston

Gates Phillips Thruston was an American lawyer and businessman. Born in Ohio, he served in the Union Army during the American Civil War and started a legal practise in Nashville, Tennessee in the postbellum era. He served as the president of the State Insurance Company. He also was an amateur archeologist, and the author of several books about Native American mounds and artifacts. His collection is held at the Tennessee State Museum.

Thruston may refer to people with the first or middle name Thruston:

Samuel Thruston Ballard was an American politician, who served as the 33rd Lieutenant Governor of Kentucky from 1919 to 1923, under Governor Edwin P. Morrow.

Thruston Ballard Morton American politician

Thruston Ballard Morton, was an American politician. A Republican, Morton represented Kentucky in the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate.

Military

Thruston's Additional Continental Regiment was an American infantry unit that served for a little more than two years in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. Authorized in March 1777, four companies were organized in Virginia during the spring and summer of 1777. George Washington appointed influential Shenandoah Valley political leader Charles Mynn Thruston as colonel in command. The regiment participated in the Philadelphia Campaign in late 1777. One company was detached from the regiment on 4 April 1778 and became part of Hartley's Additional Continental Regiment. The unit was present in the Monmouth Campaign in June 1778. What was left of the regiment was attached to Grayson's Additional Continental Regiment on 15 November 1778. Grayson's and Thruston's Regiments were absorbed by Gist's Additional Continental Regiment on 22 April 1779 and Thruston's Regiment ceased to exist.

See also

Joseph Thomas (Joe) Threston is an American Navy systems engineer, known for his contributions to the development of the Aegis Combat System.

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