Thwart

Last updated
Drawing of a canoe showing thwarts. The centre thwart, shaped like a yoke, serves as a carrying pole. Canoe drawing showing thwarts - 01.png
Drawing of a canoe showing thwarts. The centre thwart, shaped like a yoke, serves as a carrying pole.

A thwart is a strut placed crosswise (left/right) in a ship or boat, to brace it crosswise. In rowboats it can also serve as a seat for a rower. Some inflatable boats have a thwart which can be folded and removed so the boat can be deflated and rolled up for transport or storage. [1] [2]

Strut structural component designed to resist longitudinal compression

A strut is a structural component commonly found in engineering, aeronautics, architecture and anatomy. Struts generally work by resisting longitudinal compression, but they may also serve in tension.

Inflatable boat type of lightweight boat

An inflatable boat is a lightweight boat constructed with its sides and bow made of flexible tubes containing pressurised gas. For smaller boats, the floor and hull is often flexible, while for boats longer than 3 metres (9.8 ft), the floor typically consists of three to five rigid plywood or aluminium sheets fixed between the tubes, but not joined rigidly together. Often the transom is rigid, providing a location and structure for mounting an outboard motor.

Related Research Articles

Dinghy type of small boat

A dinghy is a type of small boat, often carried or towed for use as a lifeboat or tender by a larger vessel. The term is a loanword from the Bengali ḍiṅgi, Urdu ḍīngī & Hindi ḍieṁgī. Utility dinghies are usually rowboats or have an outboard motor, but while some are rigged for sailing, they are not to be confused with sailing dinghies which are designed first and foremost for this purpose.

Hamburger Flugzeugbau (HFB) was an aircraft manufacturer, located primarily in the Finkenwerder quarter of Hamburg, Germany. Established in 1933 as an offshoot of Blohm & Voss shipbuilders, it later became an operating division within its parent company and was known as Abteilung Flugzeugbau der Schiffswerft Blohm & Voss from 1937 until it ceased operation at the end of World War II. In the postwar period it was revived as an independent company under its original name and subsequently joined several consortia before being merged to form MBB. It participates in the present day Airbus and European aerospace programs.

Tracht traditional garment in German-speaking countries, especially in Bavaria and Austria

Tracht refers to traditional garments in German-speaking countries. Although the word is most often associated with Bavarian, Austrian and South Tyrolian garments, including lederhosen and dirndls, many other peoples of Germany have them.

Clinker (boat building) method of boat building

Clinker built is a method of boat building where the edges of hull planks overlap each other. Where necessary in larger craft shorter planks can be joined end to end into a longer strake or hull plank. The technique developed in northern Europe and was successfully used by the Anglo-Saxons, Frisians, Scandinavians, and typical for the Hanseatic cog. A contrasting method, where plank edges are butted smoothly seam to seam, is known as carvel construction.

Rowing act of propelling a boat using the motion of oars in the water

Rowing is the act of propelling a boat using the motion of oars in the water, displacing water, and propelling the boat forward. The difference between paddling and rowing is that rowing requires oars to have a mechanical connection with the boat, while paddles are hand-held and have no mechanical connection.

Operation Jungle

Operation Jungle was a program by the British Secret Intelligence Service (MI6) early in the Cold War (1948–1955) for the clandestine insertion of intelligence and resistance agents into Poland and the Baltic states. The agents were mostly Polish, Estonian, Latvian and Lithuanian exiles who had been trained in the UK and Sweden and were to link up with the anti-Soviet resistance in the occupied states. The naval operations of the program were carried out by German crewmembers of the German Mine Sweeping Administration under the control of the Royal Navy. The American-sponsored Gehlen Organization also got involved in the draft of agents from Eastern Europe. The KGB penetrated the network and captured or turned most of the agents.

Finkenwerder Quarter of Hamburg in Germany

Finkenwerder is a quarter of Hamburg, Germany in the borough Hamburg-Mitte. It is the location of a plant of Airbus and its airport. In 2016 the population was 11,727.

A Thames skiff is a traditional River Thames wooden rowing boat used for the activity of skiffing. These boats evolved from Thames wherries in the Victorian era to meet a passion for river exploration and leisure outings on the water.

German submarine U-1222 was a Type IXC/40 U-boat built for Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine during World War II.

German submarine U-1223 was a Type IXC/40 U-boat built for Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine during World War II.

German submarine <i>U-1228</i> submarine in WW2

German submarine U-1228 was a Type IXC/40 U-boat built for Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine during World War II.

German submarine U-1233 was a Type IXC/40 U-boat built for Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine during World War II.

German submarine U-1231 was a Type IXC/40 U-boat built for Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine during World War II.

German submarine U-1229 was a Type IXC/40 U-boat built for Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine during World War II.

German submarine <i>U-982</i> German world war II submarine

German submarine U-982 was a Type VIIC U-boat of Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine during World War II.

German submarine <i>U-1131</i> German submarine during World War II

German submarine U-1131 was a Type VIIC U-boat of Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine during World War II.

<i>Haffboot</i>

A Haffboot is the collective term for a type of sailing boat that is used as a fishing or cargo boat on the shallow Baltic Sea coast, in the Bay of Greifswald, the Stettin Lagoon and their neighbouring waterbodies until the 20th century. Using similar or identical designs for the ship's hull and its cargo hold, the fishing boats were built with wet or dry cargo holds. The flushed cargo hold, often called a Bünn in the Baltic Sea region, is not sealed hermetically from the water, but is filled with surrounding water. Small holes in the outer skin of the boat enable an exchange of water between the bünn and the outside water. The fish that are caught can thus be transported live. In a traditional fishing boat without cooling units, this allowed the time delay between catching the fish and landing them to be extended. Around the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries, haffboote were active on the Neuwarper See and in the lower Oder delta. They were built as shallow-draughted, broad-beamed clinker built vessels at small boatyards in Neuwarp, Anklam or Ueckermünde.

References

  1. Autorenkoll, Ulrich Scharnow, Leiter d. (1988). Transpress-Lexikon Seefahrt (5., bearb. u. erg. Aufl. ed.). Berlin: Transpress. p. 123. ISBN   3344001906.
  2. Hamburg], Reinhard Goltz ; [Herausgeber, Altonaer Museum in (1984). Die Sprache der Finkenwerder Fischer : die Finkenwerder Hochseefischerei : Studien zur Entwicklung eines Fachwortschatzes. Herford: Koehler. p. 113. ISBN   3782203429.