Thyine wood

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classic drawing of the tree Tetraclinis articulata - Kohler-s Medizinal-Pflanzen-270.jpg
classic drawing of the tree

Thyine wood is a 15th-century English name for a wood from the tree known botanically as Tetraclinis articulata (syn. Callitris quadrivalvis, Thuja articulata). The name is derived from the Greek word thuon, "fragrant wood," or possibly thuein, “to sacrifice”, and it was so called because it was burnt in sacrifices, on account of its fragrance.

In Rome, wood from this tree was called citrum, "citrus wood". It was considered very valuable, and was used for making articles of furniture by the Greeks and Romans. Craftsmen who worked in citrus wood and ivory had their own guild (collegium). [1]

Ancient Rome History of Rome from the 8th-century BC to the 5th-century

In historiography, ancient Rome is Roman civilization from the founding of the city of Rome in the 8th century BC to the collapse of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD, encompassing the Roman Kingdom, Roman Republic and Roman Empire until the fall of the western empire. The civilization began as an Italic settlement in the Italian peninsula, dating from the 8th century BC, that grew into the city of Rome and which subsequently gave its name to the empire over which it ruled and to the widespread civilisation the empire developed. The Roman empire expanded to become one of the largest empires in the ancient world, though still ruled from the city, with an estimated 50 to 90 million inhabitants and covering 5.0 million square kilometres at its height in AD 117.

Collegium (ancient Rome) any association in ancient Rome with a legal personality. Such associations had various functions.

A collegium was any association in ancient Rome with a legal personality. Such associations had various functions.

Thyine wood is mentioned in the King James Version of the Bible at Revelation 18:12 as being among the articles which would cease to be purchased when Babylon fell. The New International Version translates the passage "citron wood"; the Amplified Bible translates it as "scented wood".

Book of Revelation Final book of the New Testament

The Book of Revelation, often called the Revelation to John, the Apocalypse of John, The Revelation, or simply Revelation, the Revelation of Jesus Christ or the Apocalypse, is the final book of the New Testament, and therefore also the final book of the Christian Bible. It occupies a central place in Christian eschatology. Its title is derived from the first word of the text, written in Koine Greek: apokalypsis, meaning "unveiling" or "revelation". The Book of Revelation is the only apocalyptic document in the New Testament canon.

Babylon a kingdom in ancient Mesopotamia from the 18th to 6th centuries BC.

Babylon was a key kingdom in ancient Mesopotamia from the 18th to 6th centuries BC. The city was built on the Euphrates river and divided in equal parts along its left and right banks, with steep embankments to contain the river's seasonal floods. Babylon was originally a small Akkadian town dating from the period of the Akkadian Empire c. 2300 BC.

The resin is used as the basis for euparal, a mounting medium used in microscopy.

Euparal is a synthetic microscopy mountant originally formulated in 1904 by Professor G. Gilson, the professor of Zoology at Louvain University, Louvain, Belgium. It has been manufactured by several companies, but is now exclusively manufactured by ASCO Laboratories, Manchester, England.

Microscopy technical field of using microscopes to view samples and objects that cannot be seen with the unaided eye

Microscopy is the technical field of using microscopes to view objects and areas of objects that cannot be seen with the naked eye. There are three well-known branches of microscopy: optical, electron, and scanning probe microscopy, along with the emerging field of X-ray microscopy.

Notes

  1. Eborarii and citriarii: Koenraad Verboven, "The Associative Order: Status and Ethos among Roman Businessmen in Late Republic and Early Empire," Athenaeum 95 (2007), preprint p. 21.

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References

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain :  Easton, Matthew George (1897). "Thyine wood". Easton's Bible Dictionary (New and revised ed.). T. Nelson and Sons.

The public domain consists of all the creative works to which no exclusive intellectual property rights apply. Those rights may have expired, been forfeited, expressly waived, or may be inapplicable.

Matthew George Easton was a Scottish minister and writer. His most known work is the Easton's Bible Dictionary, published three years after his death.

<i>Eastons Bible Dictionary</i> Illustrated Bible dictionary compiled by Matthew George Easton

The Illustrated Bible Dictionary, better known as Easton's Bible Dictionary, is a reference work on topics related to the Christian Bible compiled by Matthew George Easton. The first edition was published in 1893, and a revised edition was published the following year. The most popular edition, however, was the third, published by Thomas Nelson in 1897, three years after Easton's death. The last contains nearly 4,000 entries relating to the Bible. Many of the entries in Easton's are encyclopedic in nature, although there are also short dictionary-type entries.