Tibet: Cry of the Snow Lion

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Tibet: Cry of the Snow Lion
Directed by Tom Peosay
Written by Maria Florio Victoria Mudd Sue Peosay
Running time
104 min
LanguageEnglish

Tibet: Cry of the Snow Lion is a 2002 documentary film about the Chinese occupation of Tibet directed by Tom Peosay. It is narrated by Martin Sheen and Tibetan voiceovers are provided by Edward Edwards, Tim Robbins, Susan Sarandon and Shirley Winters. This film won the "Audience Award for Best Documentary" at the 2003 Santa Barbara International Film Festival. [1] It was also the 2003 "Official Selection" at Toronto International Film Festival, Seattle International Film Festival and Los Angles Film Festival. [1] [2]

A Los Angeles Times movie reviewer wrote, "the most comprehensive and devastating documentary yet on that tragic country, ends with a note of optimism from the Dalai Lama in the face of the suffering and oppression of his people. (...) Since the Chinese invaded Tibet, which has a population of 6 million, in the wake of the Communist Revolution more than half a century ago, an estimated 1.2 million Tibetans have died in the course of a brutal occupation, and approximately 3,000 people risk their lives every year hiking over the Himalayas to escape." [3]

The New York Times review stated, "impeccably made, often moving account of the captive nation of Tibet, forcibly annexed by China more than 50 years ago. (...) in fact, the monasteries were systematically destroyed by Chinese military forces in the late 1950’s and early 60’s. (...) A more concise and affecting summation of the Tibetan crisis would be hard to imagine." [4]


  1. 1 2 "Tibet: Cry of the Snow Lion". IMDb (Trailer frames at timestamp 02:33). Retrieved 2020-09-13.
  2. "Tibet: Cry of the Snow Lion". cryofthesnowlion.com. 2020-09-13. Archived from the original on 2016-03-21. Retrieved 2020-09-13.
  3. Thomas, Kevin (2019-05-17). "Los Angeles Times" [MOVIE REVIEW Documentary on Tibet is sweeping and devastating- Footage in “Cry of the Snow Lion” shows strength and persistence in the wake of brutality.](PDF). web.archive.org. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2019-05-17. Retrieved 2020-09-13. 'Tibet: Cry of the Snow Lion,' the most comprehensive and devastating documentary yet on that tragic country, ends with a note of optimism from the Dalai Lama in the face of the suffering and oppression of his people. However, the breadth and depth that director Tom Peosay and writers Sue Peosay and Victoria Mudd have brought to their film suggest how bleak the prospects really are for the Tibetan people. Since the Chinese invaded Tibet, which has a population of 6 million, in the wake of the Communist Revolution more than half a century ago, an estimated 1.2 million Tibetans have died in the course of a brutal occupation, and approximately 3,000 people risk their lives every year hiking over the Himalayas to escape.
  4. Kehr, Dave (2019-05-17). "Tibet in Crisis, Past and Present" (PDF). cryofthesnowlion.com. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2019-05-17. Retrieved 2020-09-13. Tom Peosay’s documentary 'Tibet: Cry of the Snow Lion' is an impeccably made, often moving account of the captive nation of Tibet, forcibly annexed by China more than 50 years ago. (...) in fact, the monasteries were systematically destroyed by Chinese military forces in the late 1950’s and early 60’s. (...) A more concise and affecting summation of the Tibetan crisis would be hard to imagine.

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