Ticketron

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Ticketron was a computerized event ticketing technology that was in operation from the 1960s until the majority of its assets and business, with the exception of a small antitrust carve-out for Broadway's "Telecharge" business-unit, were finally purchased by Lovecraft Investment Group in 1990. [1] It was founded by Jack Quinn.

Ticketron was the name of a service created by Ticket Reservations Systems, Inc. The company changed its name to Ticketron in July, 1969. The system used terminals that it called "electronic box offices" that were located in publicly accessible locations, such as banks and department stores.

Ticketron was owned by computer maker Control Data from 1968 until 1990. In 1990 the company was bought by The Carlyle Group who sold it the following year to rival Ticketmaster. [2]

In addition to the better-known event ticketing system, Ticketron also provided ticketing terminals and back-end infrastructure for parimutuel betting, and provided similar services for a number of US lotteries, including those in New York, Pennsylvania and Maryland.

The original software resided on a pair (one for backup) of Control Data Corporation 1700 computers that were located in the basement of the Beverly Hilton Hotel. The system had back-up power generators to help ensure un-interruptible service. The system was designed to ensure that a given 'seat' at an event could not be sold more than once.

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References

  1. "ticket masters – part 2: the rise of ticketmaster" . Retrieved 27 December 2016.
  2. "Ticketmaster Deal To Get Ticketron". The New York Times . February 28, 1991. p. 4 (section D). Retrieved May 30, 2020.