Tiffany Holmes

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Tiffany Holmes (born 1964) is new media artist living in Chicago, IL.

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Early life and education

Tiffany Holmes was born in Baltimore, MD. Her formal education includes: a PhD (2004-2010) "Eco-visualization: Combining art and technology to reduce energy consumption," [1] earned via the Znode, a collaboration between the Institute for Cultural Studies, University of the Arts, Zurich and the Arts Department, University of Plymouth, UK; an MFA (1996-1999) Imaging and Digital Arts, [2] University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD; an MFA (1992-1996) Painting, Maryland Institute, College of Art, Baltimore, MD; and a BA (1986-1990, cum laude) Art History with a minor in Environmental Studies, Williams College, Williamstown, MA.

Work

In her research and practice, Holmes explores the potential of technology to promote positive environmental stewardship. She coined the term "eco-visualization" in 2005. [3] [4] Her creative projects include a commission for the National Center for Supercomputing Applications where sequences of experimental animations visualize real time energy loads. [5]

Her paper detailing this work, “Eco-visualization: Combining art and technology to reduce energy consumption,” won a Best Paper award at Creativity and Cognition 2007 [6] and a 2010 doctoral degree. She lectures and exhibits worldwide in these venues: Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, [7] J. Paul Getty Museum [8] in Los Angeles, 01SJ Biennial, SIGGRAPH 2000, Worldart in Denmark, Interaction ’01 in Japan, ISEA Nagoya. A recipient of the Michigan Society of Fellows research fellowship [9] in 1998, Holmes has earned the Illinois Arts Council individual grant, an Artists-in-Labs residency award in Switzerland, and a 2010 Rhizome Commission. [10]

Holmes is a professor in the Department of Art and Technology Studies at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Art Works

Publications

Related Research Articles

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