Timeline of Fauquier County, Virginia in the Civil War

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Warrenton, Fauquier County encampment, 1862 Virginia, Warrenton, "What do I want, John Henry"^ - NARA - 533301.jpg
Warrenton, Fauquier County encampment, 1862

Timeline of Fauquier County, Virginia in the Civil War

Contents

Fauquier County was the site of many American Civil War battles. These battles included (in order) the First Battle of Rappahannock Station, the Battle of Thoroughfare Gap, the Battle of Kelly's Ford, the Battle of Aldie, the Battle of Middleburg, the Battle of Upperville, the First and Second Battle of Auburn, the Battle of Buckland Mills, and the Second Battle of Rappahannock Station.

Pre War

1861

1862

"How many now passing with careless hearts will 'ere another week be citizens of an unknown world? God have mercy on their noble souls. Our own dear boys may never return to their once peaceful and happy home. With fervent prayer we commend them to God who alone has the power to protect and save them." [10]

1863

1864

1865

Post-war

Notes

  1. 1850 United States Federal Census
  2. Scheel, Eugene, "The Civil War in Fauquier County", 1985 p. 10
  3. 1 2 Helm, Lewis M.,"Black Horse Cavalry Defend our Beloved Country", 2004
  4. 1 2 3 4 Toler, John, "250 Years in Fauquier County: A Virginia Story", 2008, p. 78
  5. Goetz, Dave, "Magazine of the University of Louisville", Fall 2000, Vol. 20, No. 4, p 12-15
  6. Gott, John and Ramey, Emily. The Years of Anguish, 1987
  7. Moffett, Lee, "The Diary of Court House Square", 1988, p. 31
  8. Scheel, Eugene, "The Civil War in Fauquier County", 1985, p. 31
  9. Welton, J. Michael, "My Heart is So Rebellious", 1991, p. 94
  10. Fauquier Historical Society, "News and Notes", Vol. 14, 1992
  11. New York Times,Sept. 30, 1862
  12. "Fauquier County Commemorating the 150th Anniversary of the American Civil War". Archived from the original on 2013-07-29. Retrieved 2014-03-24.
  13. "Kelly's Ford". Archived from the original on 2001-02-10.
  14. http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/Middleburg [ dead link ]
  15. Warman, Joanne, The Memorial Wall to Name the Fallen, 1998, p. 61.
  16. Fauquier Historical Society: "News & Notes", Vol. 10, #1, 1988.
  17. Fauquier Historical Society: News & Notes, Vol. 11, #4, 1988.
  18. Toler, John. 250 Years in Fauquier County: A Virginia Story, 2008, p.
  19. Prindl, Andreas. A Companion to Fauquier County, Virginia, 2007.
  20. Fauquier County Minute Book, Nov 25, 1864.
  21. Toler, John. 250 Years in Fauquier County: A Virginia Story, 2008. p. 98.
  22. Evans, Thomas and Moyer, James. Mosby's Confederacy, 1991.
  23. Toler, John. 205 Years in Fauquier County: A Virginia Story, 2008, p. 100.
  24. Moffett, Lee. The Diary of Courthouse Square, 1996, p. 35.
  25. Moffett, Lee. The Diary of Courthouse Square, 1996, p. 42.
  26. 1 2 Warman, Joanne. The Memorial Wall to Name the Fallen, Warrenton, Virginia Cemetery.
  27. Goetz, David. Hell is Being a Republican in Virginia.
  28. http://encyclopediavirginia.org

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References