Titans of Mavericks

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Titans of Mavericks poster Titans of Mavericks.jpeg
Titans of Mavericks poster

Titans of Mavericks was a big wave surfing action sports event that took place south of San Francisco at the surfing site of Mavericks, California. Athletes competed annually in conditions that can reach up to 60 feet (18 m) in wave height.

Contents

The contest was initiated in 1999 and last held in 2016. The company then filed for bankruptcy, cancelling the 2017 contest and the World Surf League took over the event. [1] In 2019, the World Surf League ended the event indefinitely, citing "various logistical challenges" and "the inability to run the event the last two seasons." [2]

History

2010 Mavericks surfing competition. 2010 mavericks competition edit1.jpg
2010 Mavericks surfing competition.
Spectators of Mavericks contest in 2010. Maverick's spectators 2.jpg
Spectators of Mavericks contest in 2010.

The first surfing contest at Mavericks, last known as the Titans of Mavericks, [3] was held in 1999 and was held ten times, with the final contest occurring in 2016. The organizers would invite 24 big wave surfers each year to compete in the one-day event, but it was only held if wave conditions were favorable during the competition season.[ citation needed ]

Darryl Virostko ("Flea") won the initial contest in 1999, while Richard Schmidt, Ross Clarke-Jones, and Peter Mel took second, third, and fourth places, respectively. The following year put Virostko, Kelly Slater, Tony Ray, Peter Mel, Zach Wormhoudt, and Matt Ambrose in first through sixth places. In 2004, Virostko, Ambrose, Evan Slater, Anthony Tashnick, Mel, and Grant Washburn placed in spots first through sixth. Tashnick came first in 2005. In 2006, Grant Baker, from South Africa, won first place, with Tyler Smith and Brock Little in second and third. The 2007 contest was called off because unusually mild weather resulted in no days with suitable waves by the end of March, the usual cutoff time for holding the competition. In 2008, Greg Long was crowned Mavericks Champion, Baker won second, and Jamie Sterling won third place, followed by Smith in fourth, Washburn in fifth, and Evan Slater in sixth. The contest was cancelled again in 2009. [4] In 2010 South Africa's Chris Bertish took first place, winning a surfing prize purse of US$150 000, sponsored by Moose Guen, Jane Sunderland, and Barracuda Networks.

In the fall of 2010, a group of surfers, community leaders, and contest organizers formed the Half Moon Bay Surf Group, Inc., intending to control the contest. In October, the San Mateo Harbor Commission granted them the permit, and official planning of the inaugural "The Jay at Maverick's Big Wave Invitational" (as it was then called) [5] began. [6] Invited competitors included 11-time ASP World Champion Kelly Slater and 23 others. [7] However, the contest was not held due to a lack of waves in 2011 and 2012. The 2013 contest was won by Peter Mel, and the 2014 one was won by Grant Baker. [3] The contest was rebranded "Titans of Mavericks", with governance by five Mavericks riders known as the "Committee 5" . The last [2] Mavericks Surf contest was held on February 12, 2016.

AT&T Park in San Francisco hosted[ when? ] live broadcasts of the event on its giant (110 foot wide) video display. [8]

In October 2006, the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary proposed banning personal watercraft from Mavericks, which led to disputes within the sport. [9]

Mavericks contest results

The following is a list of past Mavericks invitational competitions and winners.

Season(s)Date Held [10] Champion2nd Place3rd Place4th Place5th Place6th Place
1998-1999February 17, 1999 Flag of California.svg Darryl Virostko Flag of California.svg Richard Schmidt Flag of Australia (converted).svg Ross Clarke-Jones Flag of California.svg Peter Mel
1999-2000March 3, 2000 Flag of California.svg Darryl Virostko Flag of Florida.svg Kelly Slater Flag of Australia (converted).svg Tony Ray Flag of California.svg Peter Mel Flag of California.svg Zach Wormhoudt Flag of California.svg Matt Ambrose
2000-2003No contest held
2003-2004February 7, 2004 Flag of California.svg Darryl Virostko Flag of California.svg Matt Ambrose Flag of California.svg Evan Slater Flag of California.svg Anthony Tashnick Flag of California.svg Peter Mel Flag of California.svg Grant Washburn
2004-2005March 2, 2005 Flag of California.svg Anthony Tashnick Flag of California.svg Greg Long Flag of California.svg Tyler Smith Flag of California.svg Zach Wormhoudt Flag of California.svg Shane Desmond Flag of California.svg Matt Ambrose
2005-2006February 8, 2006 Flag of South Africa.svg Grant Baker Flag of California.svg Tyler Smith Flag of Hawaii.svg Brock Little Flag of California.svg Matt Ambrose Flag of California.svg Grant Washburn Flag of California.svg Evan Slater
2006-2007No contest held
2007-2008January 12, 2008 Flag of California.svg Greg Long Flag of South Africa.svg Grant Baker Flag of Hawaii.svg Jamie Sterling Flag of California.svg Tyler Smith Flag of California.svg Grant Washburn Flag of California.svg Evan Slater
2008-2009No contest held
2009-2010February 13, 2010 Flag of South Africa.svg Chris Bertish Flag of California.svg Shane Desmond Flag of California.svg Anthony Tashnick Flag of Hawaii.svg Dave Wessel Flag of Brazil.svg Carlos Brule Flag of California.svg Kenny Collins
2010-2012No contest held
2012-2013January 20, 2013 Flag of California.svg Peter Mel Flag of California.svg Zach Wormhoudt Flag of California.svg Greg Long Flag of Brazil.svg Alex Martins Flag of Hawaii.svg Mark Healey Flag of California.svg Shawn Dollar
2013-2014January 24, 2014 Flag of South Africa.svg Grant Baker Flag of Hawaii.svg Shane Dorian Flag of California.svg Ryan Augenstein Flag of California.svg Tyler Fox Flag of California.svg Greg Long Flag of California.svg Anthony Tashnick
2014-2015No contest held
2015-2016February 12, 2016 Flag of California.svg Nic Lamb Flag of California.svg Travis Payne Flag of California.svg Greg Long Flag of California.svg Tyler Fox Flag of Australia (converted).svg Jaime Mitchell Flag of Brazil.svg Carlos Brule

Indefinite cancellation of the event

In 2019, after two years in a row of canceled competitions, the World Surf League announced that the contest had been canceled indefinitely, citing "various logistical challenges" and "the inability to run the event the last two seasons." [11] The competition has not been held since.

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References

  1. Stech, Katy (August 24, 2017). "World Surf League to Take Over Titans of Mavericks Contest". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 12 May 2018.
  2. 1 2 "World Surf League Ends Titans Of Mavericks Competition". CBS SF BayArea. 2019-09-02. Retrieved 2020-01-14.
  3. 1 2 "Titans of Mavericks - History" . Retrieved August 23, 2015.
  4. "The 2009 Mavericks Surf Contest is canceled due to lack of waves". Surfertoday.com. October 16, 2011. Retrieved October 20, 2011.
  5. "Barracuda Networks". ThejayatMavericks.com. Retrieved 2013-01-29.
  6. Julia Scott (October 21, 2010). "Newcomer ousts longtime Mavericks surf event promoter". San Jose Mercury News .
  7. Mark Conley (November 5, 2010). "Mavericks surf contest adds Kelly Slater's name back to list". San Jose Mercury News .
  8. "Mavericks Surf". Mavericks Surf. December 3, 2009. Retrieved October 20, 2011.
  9. Ashley Powers (November 25, 2006). "Proposal could have surfers cooling their jets". Los Angeles Times .
  10. "Mavericks Surf Winners".
  11. "World Surf League Ends Titans Of Mavericks Competition". CBS SF BayArea. 2019-09-02. Retrieved 2020-01-14.