Tomatin railway station

Last updated

Tomatin
Tomatin Station (geograph 3511112).jpg
Site of the former station (2013)
Location Tomatin, Highland
Scotland
Coordinates 57°20′20″N4°00′12″W / 57.3388°N 4.0034°W / 57.3388; -4.0034 Coordinates: 57°20′20″N4°00′12″W / 57.3388°N 4.0034°W / 57.3388; -4.0034
Grid reference NH795293
Platforms2
Other information
StatusDisused
History
Original company Highland Railway
Pre-grouping Highland Railway
Post-grouping London, Midland and Scottish Railway
Key dates
8 July 1897 (1897-07-08)Opened
3 May 1965 (1965-05-03)Closed

Tomatin railway station served the village of Tomatin, Highland, Scotland from 1897 to 1965 on the Inverness and Aviemore Direct Railway.

Contents

History

The station opened on 8 July 1897 by the Highland Railway. The station closed to both passengers and goods traffic on 3 May 1965. [1]

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References

  1. "Tomatin Station". Canmore. Retrieved 5 October 2017.
Preceding station Historical railways Following station
Carrbridge
Line and station open
  Highland Railway
Inverness and Aviemore Direct Railway
  Moy
Line open, station closed