Tomslake

Last updated
Tomslake
unincorporated settlement
Tomslake Store.jpg
Canada British Columbia location map 2.svg
Red pog.svg
Tomslake
Location of Tomslake in British Columbia
Coordinates: 55°32′59″N120°04′43″W / 55.5496°N 120.0787°W / 55.5496; -120.0787 Coordinates: 55°32′59″N120°04′43″W / 55.5496°N 120.0787°W / 55.5496; -120.0787
Country Canada
Province British Columbia
Established1939

Tomslake is an unincorporated settlement in British Columbia.

British Columbia Province of Canada

British Columbia is the westernmost province of Canada, located between the Pacific Ocean and the Rocky Mountains. With an estimated population of 5.071 million as of 2019, it is Canada's third-most populous province.

It is located in the Peace River Country, immediately west of the Alberta border, along Highway 2, south from Pouce Coupe, on the north side of Tate Creek, to the northwest of Swan Lake. The community was established in 1939 by a group of refugees (Sudeten Germans) from the Sudetenland of Czechoslovakia. Most of the settlers came from the Sudetenland.

Peace River Country geographic region in Alberta and British Columbia

The Peace River Country is an aspen parkland region centring on the Peace River in Canada. It extends from northwestern Alberta to the Rocky Mountains in northeastern British Columbia, where a certain portion of the region is also referred to as the Peace River Block.

Alberta Province of Canada

Alberta is a province of Canada. With an estimated population of 4,067,175 as of 2016 census, it is Canada's fourth most populous province and the most populous of Canada's three prairie provinces. Its area is about 660,000 square kilometres (250,000 sq mi). Alberta and its neighbour Saskatchewan were districts of the Northwest Territories until they were established as provinces on September 1, 1905. The premier is Jason Kenney as of April 30, 2019.

Highway 2, known locally as the Tupper Highway, is one of the two short connections from Dawson Creek to the border between B.C. and Alberta. The actual '2' designation has a more complex history than that of the highway that carries it today. When Highway 2 was first designated in 1941, it followed the present-day route of the Cariboo Highway between Cache Creek and Prince George. In 1952, Highway 2 was extended along the John Hart Highway all the way through Dawson Creek to the border between B.C. and Alberta at Tupper. In 1953, the section of Highway 2 between Cache Creek and Dawson Creek was given the designation of '97', and the designations of 2 and 97 co-existed until 1962, when the '2' designation was removed from the Cariboo and John Hart Highways.

Sudeten Provincial Park and Swan Lake Provincial Park are located south of the settlement. The eponymous Toms Lake is located slightly north of the settlement.

Sudeten Provincial Park former provincial park in British Columbia, Canada

Sudeten Provincial Park is a former provincial park in British Columbia, Canada. Ownership of the five-hectare park was transferred from the provincial government to local government for park purposes in 2006. It is now known as Sudeten Heritage Park and operated by Tomslake & District Recreation Commission.

Swan Lake Provincial Park is a provincial park in British Columbia, Canada.

Commons-logo.svg Media related to Tomslake, British Columbia at Wikimedia Commons


Related Research Articles

Sudetenland historical German name for areas of Czechoslovakia which were inhabited by Sudeten Germans

The Sudetenland is the historical German name for the northern, southern, and western areas of former Czechoslovakia which were inhabited primarily by Sudeten Germans. These German speakers had predominated in the border districts of Bohemia, Moravia, and Czech Silesia from the time of the Austrian Empire.

Okanagan Region of British Columbia, Canada

The Okanagan, also known as the Okanagan Valley and sometimes as the Okanagan Country, is a region in the Canadian province of British Columbia defined by the basin of Okanagan Lake and the Canadian portion of the Okanagan River. It is part of the Okanagan Country, extending into the United States as Okanogan County in north-central Washington. According to the 2016 Canadian census, the region's population is 362,258. The primary city is Kelowna.

Bearhole Lake Provincial Park is a provincial park in British Columbia, Canada, located 5 km east of the mining community of Tumbler Ridge, on the Alberta Plateau. Established in January 2001, the park includes 17,762 ha of land in the Boreal White and Black Spruce biogeoclimatic zones within the Kiskatinaw Plateau. It is transition zone with mixed wood forests including spruce, pine, and larch. Bearhole Lake, the headwaters of the Kiskatinaw River provides habitat for trumpeter swans, yellow perch, burbot, rainbow trout, and northern pike.

Junction Sheep Range Provincial Park is a provincial park in British Columbia, Canada, located near the confluence of the Chilcotin and Fraser Rivers on the west bank of the latter river.

Monte Lake Provincial Park is a provincial park in British Columbia, Canada, located on the east side of Monte Lake and to the south of the community of Monte Lake, British Columbia which is at the north end of the lake. About eight hectares in size, it protects an area of Ponderosa pine and grasslands.

Northern Rocky Mountains Provincial Park provincial park in British Columbia

Northern Rocky Mountains Provincial Park is a provincial park in British Columbia, Canada. It is located in the north-eastern part of the province, 90 km south-west from Fort Nelson and it is bordered to the north by the Alaska Highway. Access is mostly done by boat, aircraft, on horseback or by hiking.

Pennask Lake Provincial Park is a provincial park in British Columbia, Canada, located on the easternmost heights of the Thompson Plateau, 50km to the northwest of the Okanagan town of Peachland.

Shannon Falls Provincial Park provincial park

Shannon Falls Provincial Park is a provincial park in British Columbia, Canada. It is located 58 kilometers (36 mi) from Vancouver and 2 kilometers (1.2 mi) south of Squamish along the Sea to Sky Highway. Shannon Falls is the third highest waterfall in British Columbia.

Shuswap Lake Provincial Park

Shuswap Lake Provincial Park is a provincial park in British Columbia, Canada.

Spruce Lake Protected Area

The Spruce Lake Protected Area, was a 71,347-hectare Protected Area in the British Columbia provincial parks system 200 km north of Vancouver. The area had been the subject of an ongoing preservationist controversy since the 1930s. Formerly known variously as the Southern Chilcotin Mountains Provincial Park, Southern Chilcotins, and also as South Chilcotin Provincial Park. In 2007, its status as a provincial park was downgraded to protected area.

Swan Lake Kispiox River Provincial Park is a provincial park in British Columbia, Canada. It lies within the territories of the Gitanyow and Gitxsan First Nations. The park and the area surrounding it are important to First Nations people for cultural activities. There are trumpeter swans known to be on Club Creek in the winter.

Tweedsmuir North Provincial Park and Protected Area

Tweedsmuir North Provincial Park and Protected Area is a provincial park in British Columbia, Canada, which along with Tweedsmuir South Provincial Park and Entiako Provincial Park and Protected Area were once part of Tweedsmuir Provincial Park, then B. C.'s largest park, 9,810 square kilometres (3,790 sq mi) located in the Coast Range. Tweedsmuir gained park status in 1938 and Wells Gray Provincial Park in 1939, the earliest large parks established in the provincial parks system. Tweedsmuir North Provincial Park and Protected Area was re-designated a park and protected area as the latter classification allows resource extraction and other economic activities not permitted in full park designations. Entiako Provincial Park and Protected Area is located on the south flank of the Nechako River watercourse.

Tweedsmuir South Provincial Park provincial park in British Columbia, Canada

Tweedsmuir South Provincial Park is a provincial park located in the central west of British Columbia, Canada. Formerly part of Tweedsmuir Provincial Park which was originally 981,000 hectares in size. It was formed from the southern portion of that park, the northern portion being re-designated Tweedsmuir North Provincial Park and Protected Area in order to allow resource extraction in the park.

Interior Mountains

The Interior Mountains, also called the Northern Interior Mountains and Interior Ranges, are the semi-official names for a huge area that comprises much of the northern two thirds of the Canadian province of British Columbia and a large area of southern Yukon.

Depot Creek (BC-Washington) river in United States of America

Depot Creek, also known as Brown Creek and Kokanee Creek, is a large creek in south-central British Columbia, Canada and Whatcom County, Washington, United States. It is in the Pacific Ocean drainage basin, and is located in the North Cascades. There is a waterfall along its course, Depot Creek Falls.

The Edwards Range is a small mountain range near the northern end of the Pacific Ranges of the Coast Mountains of British Columbia, Canada, located north of Gellenspetz Creek and southeast of the town of Bella Coola. It has an area of 179 km2.

Gundy, Alberta

The locality of Gundy, on the British Columbia-Alberta border northeast of Dawson Creek, was named after H.W. Gundy, a partner in the Toronto real estate firm, Gundy & Gundy, who, in 1915, purchased 35,000 acres of land in the area with the view of selling it to incoming settlers on January 10, 1916. With plenty of land available by homestead grant, there were no buyers for Gundy’s remote scheme, so in 1922 they formed the Tate Creek Cattle Company, better known as the Gundy Ranch. They brought in 1000 head of cattle but lost 900 head the first winter. They then sold all but the land and the buildings. In the stock market crash of 1929, Gundy’s fortune was lost, and any profit from the ranch was retained by the manager of the ranch, whom they were no longer able to pay. About this same time, land north and east of the ranch was opened for homesteading, and in 1932 the Gundy Post Office was established in the home of James Kellar on the B.C. side of the border. In 1936, the Gundy Church was built, but the Gundy Cemetery on the lot east of the church, was laid out in Alberta. The Gundy Ranch land was eventually acquired by the Canadian Colonization Association, a division of the Department of Immigration and Colonization of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company, and in 1939 about 500 Sudetens were settled there. The Sudetens were opposed to Hitler and the Nazi government, and had fled after Germany invaded Sudetenland.