Top-Notch Magazine

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Top-Notch Magazine is an American pulp magazine of adventure fiction published between 1910 and 1937 by Street & Smith in New York City. [1]

Contents

History and profile

Top-Notch Magazine was first published in March 1910. [2] Issued twice-monthly, it published 602 editions until it ceased in October 1937. [2] For most of its history, the cover price was 10 cents. Began as a magazine for teenagers and even as a pulp concentrated mostly on sports stories, switching to a men's adventure magazine in the 1930s. Notable contributors to Top-Notch Magazine included Jack London, F. Britten Austin, William Wallace Cook, Bertram Atkey, and Johnston McCulley in the early days; and later Robert E. Howard, [3] L. Ron Hubbard, [4] Lester Dent, [5] Carl Jacobi, [6] Burt L. Standish, J. Allan Dunn, and Harry Stephen Keeler.

Notes

  1. Yesterday's Faces:Dangerous Horizons by Robert Sampson. Popular Press, 1991, (p. 186).
  2. 1 2 "Top-Notch". The Pulp Magazines Project. Retrieved 8 May 2020.
  3. Robert E. Howard by Marc Cerasini,and Charles E. Hoffman, Starmont House, 1987,(p. 123)
  4. Pulp Culture - The Art of Fiction Magazines by Frank M. Robinson and Lawrence Davidson, Collectors Press, Inc. 2007( p.184-5).
  5. Robinson and Davidson, (p. 11)
  6. Lost in the Rentharpian Hills: spanning the decades with Carl Jacobi by R. Dixon Smith. Popular Press, 1985 (p. 79)

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References