Topocide

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Topocide is the deliberate culling of a place through industrial expansion and change, so that its earlier landscape and character are destroyed. [1]

Landscape visible features of an area of land

A landscape is the visible features of an area of land, its landforms, and how they integrate with natural or man-made features. A landscape includes the physical elements of geophysically defined landforms such as (ice-capped) mountains, hills, water bodies such as rivers, lakes, ponds and the sea, living elements of land cover including indigenous vegetation, human elements including different forms of land use, buildings, and structures, and transitory elements such as lighting and weather conditions. Combining both their physical origins and the cultural overlay of human presence, often created over millennia, landscapes reflect a living synthesis of people and place that is vital to local and national identity.

An alternative term is domicide, the destruction of home; the two may be viewed as synonyms or they may be opposed, with topocide referring to destruction from the point of view of the destroyers (generally outsiders) and domicide from the point of view of the inhabitants. [2]

Topocide can be the result of deliberate industrial expansion. When industries form, then the people's center of life revolve around that industry. New jobs are formed and the environmental and cultural landscape is forever changed.

Arguable examples include the destruction of Dresden at the end of World War II and the Khmer Rouge's destruction in Cambodia. [3]

Dresden Place in Saxony, Germany

Dresden is the capital city of the German state of Saxony, and with around 550,000 inhabitants, it is the state's second most populous city after Leipzig. It is the 12th most populous city of Germany, the fourth largest by area after Berlin, Hamburg and Cologne, as well as the third most populous city in the area of former East Germany, after (East) Berlin and Leipzig. Dresden is contiguous with Freital, Pirna, Radebeul, Meissen and Coswig, and its urban area has around 780,000 inhabitants, making it the largest in Saxony.

Khmer Rouge followers of the Communist Party of Kampuchea in Cambodia

The Khmer Rouge was the name popularly given to the followers of the Communist Party of Kampuchea (CPK) and by extension to the regime through which the CPK ruled in Cambodia between 1975 and 1979. The name had originally been used in the 1950s by Norodom Sihanouk as a blanket term for the Cambodian left.

Cambodia Southeast Asian sovereign state

Cambodia, officially the Kingdom of Cambodia, is a country located in the southern portion of the Indochina peninsula in Southeast Asia. It is 181,035 square kilometres in area, bordered by Thailand to the northwest, Laos to the northeast, Vietnam to the east and the Gulf of Thailand to the southwest.

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Industry production of goods or service of a given field within an economy

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In business theory, a disruptive innovation is an innovation that creates a new market and value network and eventually disrupts an existing market and value network, displacing established market-leading firms, products, and alliances. The term was defined and first analyzed by the American scholar Clayton M. Christensen and his collaborators beginning in 1995, and has been called the most influential business idea of the early 21st century.

Tychy Place in Silesian Voivodeship, Poland

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Shifting cultivation shifting cultivation or jhoom cultivation

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Morgenthau Plan

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Shoal A natural landform that rises from the bed of a body of water to near the surface and is covered by unconsolidated material

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Land degradation process in which the value of the biophysical environment is affected by a combination of human-induced processes acting upon the land

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Palatinate Forest low mountain range in Germany

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C-K theory

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Western American Art includes artistic work depicts the subjects related to the Western American, and was treated as impoverished, unwanted and unworthy art before the twentieth century, during which period it achieved respectability as a rewarding region for studying. The term holds a characteristic of narration that is different from the Modern art which focuses on abstraction. For the narration, Western American art focuses on subject than style. Considering as a national art, the subjects are distinct from the European art, namely, there is no elements from other region like Europe. Cowboys and Indians are two well-known subjects and they consist the important part of artistic work of Western American art, demonstrating the daily life and activities of cowboys and American Indian in western American.

References

  1. Swanson, Kelly (2009). AP Human Geography 2009. Kaplan. p. 153.
  2. Porteous, Douglas; Sandra E. Smith (2001). Domicide: The Global Destruction Of Home. McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP. p. 12.
  3. Collins, Andrew E (2009). Disaster and Development. Routledge. p. 109.