Tseten Samdup Chhoekyapa

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Tseten Samdup Chhoekyapa
Tseten Samdup Chhoekyapa.jpg
Representative of the Dalai Lama and the Tibetan Government in Exile for Central and Eastern Europe
Assumed office
1 April 2008
Preceded byKelsang Gyaltsen

Tseten Samdup Chhoekyapa is an official of the Tibetan Government in Exile. He is the Representative of the Dalai Lama and the Tibetan Government in Exile for Central and Eastern Europe and the head of the Tibet Bureau in Geneva. [1] He was appointed as Representative on 1 April 2008, succeeding Kelsang Gyaltsen. [2] [3] He has previously worked for the Tibetan exile government in India and London. He is a graduate of Columbia University in New York, and was born in Nepal after his parents had escaped from Tibet in 1959, after the Incorporation of Tibet into the People's Republic of China.

Central Tibetan Administration

The Central Tibetan Administration, also known as CTA is an organisation based in India. It was originally called Tibetan Kashag Government in 1960, then later renamed to "the Government of the Great Snow Land". The CTA is also referred to as the Tibetan Government in Exile which has never been recognized by China. Its internal structure is government-like; it has stated that it is "not designed to take power in Tibet"; rather, it will be dissolved "as soon as freedom is restored in Tibet" in favor of a government formed by Tibetans inside Tibet. In addition to political advocacy, it administers a network of schools and other cultural activities for Tibetans in India. On 11 February 1991, the CTA became a founding member of the Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization (UNPO) at a ceremony held at the Peace Palace in The Hague, Netherlands.

Dalai Lama Buddhist spiritual teacher

Dalai Lama is a title given by the Tibetan people for the foremost spiritual leader of the Gelug or "Yellow Hat" school of Tibetan Buddhism, the newest of the classical schools of Tibetan Buddhism. The 14th and current Dalai Lama is Tenzin Gyatso.

Central Europe region of Europe

Central Europe is the region comprising the central part of Europe. It is said to occupy continuous territory that are otherwise conventionally Western Europe, Southern Europe, and Eastern Europe. The concept of Central Europe is based on a common historical, social and cultural identity. Central Europe is going through a phase of "strategic awakening", with initiatives such as the CEI, Centrope and the Visegrád Four. While the region's economy shows high disparities with regard to income, all Central European countries are listed by the Human Development Index as very highly developed.

He is a board member of the Tibet Institute Rikon, [4] and a founding signatory of the Prague Declaration on European Conscience and Communism. [5]

Tibet Institute Rikon

The Tibet Institute Rikon is a Tibetan monastery located in Zell-Rikon im Tösstal in the Töss Valley in Switzerland. It is an established as a non-profit foundation because Swiss laws resulting from the 19th century secularization movement did until 1973 not allow for the establishment of new monasteries.

Prague Declaration on European Conscience and Communism

The Prague Declaration on European Conscience and Communism, which was signed on 3 June 2008, was a declaration initiated by the Czech government and signed by prominent European politicians, former political prisoners and historians, among them former Czech President Václav Havel and future German President Joachim Gauck, which called for "Europe-wide condemnation of, and education about, the crimes of communism."

His deputy is Under-Secretary Dawa Gyatso. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 "Mitarbeiter". The Tibet Bureau in Geneva . Retrieved 17 May 2011.
  2. "The Tibet Bureau in Geneva". Tibetan Community in Switzerland and Liechtenstein. Retrieved 2011-05-17.
  3. "Dalai Lama's Geneva Representative Attends International Meet". Phayul. September 10, 2008. Retrieved 2011-05-17.
  4. "The Foundation Board". Tibet Institute Rikon . Retrieved 2011-05-17.
  5. "Prague Declaration - Declaration Text". Institute for Information on the Crimes of Communism. 3 June 2008. Retrieved 28 January 2010.