UEFA Women's Euro 1991

Last updated
UEFA Women's Euro 1991
Europamesterskabet i fodbold for kvinder 1991
Tournament details
Host country Denmark
Dates 10 July – 14 July
Teams 4
Venue(s) 3 (in 3 host cities)
Final positions
ChampionsFlag of Germany.svg  Germany (2nd title)
Runners-upFlag of Norway.svg  Norway
Third placeFlag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
Tournament statistics
Matches played 4
Goals scored 10 (2.5 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of Germany.svg Heidi Mohr (4 goals)
Best player Flag of Germany.svg Silvia Neid
1989
1993

The 1991 UEFA Women's Championship took place in Denmark. It was won by Germany in a final against Norway in a repeat of the previous edition's final. Eighteen teams entered qualifying, which was enough to make the competition the first fully official one, so the name was changed to the UEFA Women's Championship. [1]

Denmark constitutional monarchy in Europe

Denmark, officially the Kingdom of Denmark, is a Nordic country and the southernmost of the Scandinavian nations. Denmark lies southwest of Sweden and south of Norway, and is bordered to the south by Germany. The Kingdom of Denmark also comprises two autonomous constituent countries in the North Atlantic Ocean: the Faroe Islands and Greenland. Denmark proper consists of a peninsula, Jutland, and an archipelago of 443 named islands, with the largest being Zealand, Funen and the North Jutlandic Island. The islands are characterised by flat, arable land and sandy coasts, low elevation and a temperate climate. Denmark has a total area of 42,924 km2 (16,573 sq mi), land area of 42,394 km2 (16,368 sq mi), and the total area including Greenland and the Faroe Islands is 2,210,579 km2 (853,509 sq mi), and a population of 5.8 million.

Germany womens national football team womens national association football team representing Germany

The Germany women's national football team is governed by the German Football Association (DFB).

Norway womens national football team womens national association football team representing Norway

The Norway women's national football team is controlled by the Football Association of Norway. The team is former European, World and Olympic champions and thus one of the most successful national teams. The team has had less success since the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Contents

The tournament served as the European qualifying round for the FIFA Women's World Cup 1991.

Qualification

Squads

For a list of all squads that played in the final tournament, see 1991 UEFA Women's Championship squads

Semifinals

Norway  Flag of Norway.svg 0–0 (a.e.t.)Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark
Report
DBU Report (in Danish)
NFF Report (in Norwegian)
Penalties
Svensson Soccerball shad check.svg
Aarønes Soccerball shade cross.svg
Carlsen Soccerball shad check.svg
Zaborowski Soccerball shad check.svg
Riise Soccerball shad check.svg
Medalen Soccerball shad check.svg
Hegstad Soccerball shad check.svg
Nyborg Soccerball shad check.svg
Espeseth Soccerball shad check.svg
8–7Soccerball shad check.svg Kolding
Soccerball shad check.svg Thychosen
Soccerball shad check.svg Sefron
Soccerball shade cross.svg Jacobsen
Soccerball shad check.svg Bagge
Soccerball shad check.svg Gam-Pedersen
Soccerball shad check.svg Christensen
Soccerball shad check.svg J. Hansen
Soccerball shade cross.svg M. Jensen
Hjørring Stadium, Hjørring
Attendance: 4,850
Referee: Lube Spassov (Bulgaria)

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg 3–0 Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
Mohr Soccerball shade.svg 30', 58'
Raith Soccerball shade.svg 60'
Report
DFB Report (in German)
FIGC Report (in Italian)
Frederikshavn Stadion, Frederikshavn
Attendance: 3,000
Referee: Roger Philippi (Luxembourg)

Third place playoff

Denmark  Flag of Denmark.svg 2–1 (a.e.t.)Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
H. Jensen Soccerball shade.svg 22'
Furlotti Soccerball shade.svg 85' (o.g.) [note 1]
Report
DBU Report (in Danish)
FIGC Report (in Italian)
Fiorini Soccerball shade.svg 68'
Aalborg Stadion, Aalborg
Attendance: 3,100
Referee: Raul Garcia de Loza (Spain)

Final

Germany  Flag of Germany.svg 3–1 (a.e.t.)Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
Mohr Soccerball shade.svg 62', 100'
Neid Soccerball shade.svg 110'
Report
DFB Report (in German)
NFF Report (in Norwegian)
Hegstad Soccerball shade.svg 54'
Aalborg Stadion, Aalborg
Attendance: 6,000
Referee: James McCluskey (Scotland)

Awards

 Women's Euro 1991 Champions 
Flag of Germany.svg
Germany
Second title

Goalscorers

4 goals
1 goal
Own goal

Related Research Articles

The 2005 UEFA Women's Championship, also referred to as UEFA Women's Euro 2005, was a football tournament for women held from 5 June to 19 June 2005 in Lancashire, England and Cheshire, England. The UEFA Women's Championship is a regular tournament involving European national teams from countries affiliated to UEFA, the European governing body, who have qualified for the competition. The competition aims to determine which national women's team is the best in Europe.

The 2001 UEFA Women's Championship was the eighth UEFA Women's Championship, a competition for the women's national football teams and member associations of UEFA. It took place in Germany between 23 June and 7 July 2001. It was won by Germany with 1–0 in the final against Sweden, after a golden goal.

The 1992 UEFA European Under-21 Championship, which spanned two years (1990–92), had 32 entrants. Malta and Israel competed for the first time. This was also the first appearance of the unified Germany team. Italy U-21s won the competition.

The 1984 European Competition for Women's Football was won by Sweden on penalties against England. It comprised four qualifying groups, the winner of each going through to the semi-finals which were played over two legs, home and away. As only sixteen teams took part, the competition could not be granted official status. Matches comprised two halves of 35 minutes, played with a size four football.

The 1987 European Competition for Women's Football took place in Norway. It was won by the hosts in a final against defending champions Sweden. Once again, the competition began with four qualifying groups, but this time a host nation was selected for the semi-final stage onwards after the four semi-finalists were identified.

The 1989 European Competition for Women's Football took place in West Germany. It was won by the hosts in a final against defending champions Norway. Again, the competition began with four qualifying groups, but this time the top two countries qualified for a home-and-away quarter final, before the four winners entered the semi-finals in the host nation.

The 1997 UEFA Women's Championship, also referred to as Women's Euro 1997 was a football tournament held in 1997 in Norway and Sweden. The UEFA Women's Championship is a regular tournament involving European national teams from countries affiliated to UEFA, the European governing body, who have qualified for the competition. The competition aims to determine which national women's team is the best in Europe.

The 1995 UEFA Women's Championship, also referred to as Women's Euro 1995 was a football tournament that happened between 1993 and 1995. The final game was held in Germany. The UEFA Women's Championship is a regular tournament involving European national teams from countries affiliated to UEFA, the European governing body, who have qualified for the competition. The competition aims to determine which national women's team is the best in Europe.

The 1993 UEFA Women's Championship, also referred to as Women's Euro 1993 was a football tournament that happened between 1991 and 1993. The final games was held in Italy. The UEFA Women's Championship is a regular tournament involving European national teams from countries affiliated to UEFA, the European governing body, who have qualified for the competition. The competition aims to determine which national women's team is the best in Europe.

UEFA Womens Euro 2009 2009 edition of the UEFA Womens Euro

The 2009 UEFA Women's Championship, or just Women's Euro 2009, was played in Finland between August 23 and September 10, 2009. The host was appointed on July 11, 2006, in a UEFA Executive Committee meeting in Berlin and the Finnish proposal won over the Dutch proposal.

The qualification for the UEFA Women's Euro 1993 was held between September 21, 1991 & November 14, 1992. The winner of the quarter-finals qualified.

The final tournament of the 2008 UEFA European Under-19 Championship was the 24th UEFA European Under-19 Championship, UEFA's premier competition for players under the age of 19. The tournament was held in the Czech Republic with matches played from 14 July to 26 July 2008. Players born after 1 January 1989 were eligible to participate in this competition. The top three teams in each group qualified for the 2009 U-20 World Cup.

2011 UEFA European Under-21 Championship

UEFA European Under-21 Championship 2011 was the 18th staging of UEFA's European Under-21 Championship. The final tournament was hosted by Denmark between 11 and 25 June 2011.

UEFA Womens Euro 2013 2013 edition of the UEFA Womens Euro

The 2013 UEFA Women's Championship, commonly referred to as Women's Euro 2013, was the 11th European Championship for women's national football teams organised by UEFA. The final tournament, held in Sweden from 10 to 28 July 2013, became the most-watched in the history of the Women's Euros. It concluded with Germany, the defending champions, winning their sixth consecutive and eighth overall Women's Euro title after defeating Norway in the final.

The 2011−12 UEFA Women's Champions League was the eleventh edition of the European women's championship for football clubs. The final was held in the Olympiastadion in Munich, Germany on 17 May 2012.

2016 UEFA European Under-19 Championship

The 2016 UEFA European Under-19 Championship was the 15th edition of the UEFA European Under-19 Championship, the annual European international youth football championship contested by the men's under-19 national teams of UEFA member associations. Germany, which were selected by UEFA on 20 March 2012, hosted the tournament between 11 and 24 July 2016.

UEFA Womens Euro 2017 2017 edition of the UEFA Womens Championship

The 2017 UEFA Women's Championship, commonly referred to as UEFA Women's Euro 2017, was the 12th edition of the UEFA Women's Championship, the quadrennial international football championship organised by UEFA for the women's national teams of Europe. The competition was expanded to 16 teams.

The 2014–15 UEFA Women's Champions League knockout phase began on 8 October 2014 and concluded on 14 May 2015 with the final at Friedrich-Ludwig-Jahn-Sportpark in Berlin, Germany to decide the champions of the 2014–15 UEFA Women's Champions League. A total of 32 teams competed in the knockout phase.

The 2015 UEFA European Under-21 Championship qualification play-offs constituted the second and final round of the 2015 UEFA European Under-21 Championship qualification tournament. The ties were contested over two legs, with the first leg played on 9 and 10 October and the second leg played on 14 October 2014. The seven winners qualified for the final tournament in Czech Republic.

2017 UEFA European Under-17 Championship

The 2017 UEFA European Under-17 Championship was the 16th edition of the UEFA European Under-17 Championship, the annual international youth football championship organised by UEFA for the men's under-17 national teams of Europe. Croatia, which were selected by UEFA on 26 January 2015, hosted the tournament.

References

  1. "1991: Dominant Germany stride on –". Uefa.com. Retrieved 2012-08-23.

Notes

  1. The Italian Football Federation attributes the own goal to Emma Iozzelli.