University of Cambridge Museums

Last updated

The Fitzwilliam Museum, one of the eight members of the University of Cambridge Museums consortium The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, England - IMG 0702.JPG
The Fitzwilliam Museum, one of the eight members of the University of Cambridge Museums consortium

University of Cambridge Museums is a consortium of the eight museums of the University of Cambridge, which came into being in 2012 following awarding of Major Partner Museums status by Arts Council England. [1] The consortium works in partnership with the Cambridge University Botanic Garden and other Cambridge University collections.

The consortium comprises:

Related Research Articles

Chris Stringer

Christopher Brian Stringer is a British physical anthropologist noted for his work on human evolution.

Whipple Museum of the History of Science University Museum in Cambridge

The Whipple Museum of the History of Science is a Museum attached to the University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, which houses an extensive collection of scientific instruments, apparatus, models, pictures, prints, photographs, books and other material related to the history of science. It is located in the former Perse School on Free School Lane, and was founded in 1944, when Robert Whipple presented his collection of scientific instruments to the University of Cambridge. The Museum's collection is 'designated' by the Museums, Libraries and Archives Council (MLA) as being of "national and international importance".

Steadman Upham was renamed president of the University of Tulsa (TU) in October 2012, after having served for eight years in his first tenure as University of Tulsa president, preceding six years as president of Claremont Graduate University. Prior to this time, he was vice provost for research and dean of the Graduate School and professor of archaeology at the University of Oregon.

Philip Phillips was an influential archaeologist in the United States during the 20th century. Although his first graduate work was in architecture, he later received a doctorate from Harvard University under advisor Alfred Marston Tozzer. His first archaeological experiences were on Iroquois sites, but he specialized in the Mississippian culture, especially its Lower Mississippi Valley incarnation.

Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology Archaeology museum in Cambridge, Massachusetts

The Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology is a museum affiliated with Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Founded in 1866, the Peabody Museum is one of the oldest and largest museums focusing on anthropological material, with particular focus on the ethnography and archaeology of the Americas. The museum is caretaker to over 1.2 million objects, some 900 linear feet of documents, 2,000 maps and site plans, and approximately 500,000 photographs. The museum is located at Divinity Avenue on the Harvard University campus. The museum is one of the four Harvard Museums of Science & Culture open to the public.

Downing Site

The Downing Site is a major site of the University of Cambridge, located in the centre of the city of Cambridge, England, on Downing Street and Tennis Court Road, adjacent to Downing College. The Downing Site is the larger and newer of two city-centre science sites of the university. Largely populated with utilitarian brick buildings dating from the 1930s, the more notable buildings include the Zoology Laboratory (1900–04), Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences (1904–11) and Downing Street entrance (1904–11).

Harvard Museum of Natural History

The Harvard Museum of Natural History is a natural history museum housed in the University Museum Building, located on the campus of Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East

The Harvard Museum of the Ancient Near East is a museum founded in 1889. It moved into its present location at 6 Divinity Avenue in Cambridge, Massachusetts, in 1903.

Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, University of Cambridge University Museum in Cambridge

The Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, also known as MAA, at the University of Cambridge houses the University's collections of local antiquities, together with archaeological and ethnographic artefacts from around the world. The museum is located on the University's Downing Site, on the corner of Downing Street and Tennis Court Road. In 2013 it reopened following a major refurbishment of the exhibition galleries, with a new public entrance directly on to Downing Street.

Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences Science museum in England

The Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences, is the geology museum of the University of Cambridge. It is part of the Department of Earth Sciences and is located on the University's Downing Site in Downing Street, central Cambridge, England. The Sedgwick Museum is the oldest of the eight museums which make up the University of Cambridge Museums consortium.

University of Liverpool Department of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology

The University of Liverpool Department of Archaeology, Classics and Egyptology has 40 members of staff and over 300 undergraduate and postgraduate students.

J. Patrick Greene is a British archaeologist and museum director. He served as Director of the Science and Industry Museum, in Manchester, England from 1983 to 2002, and then CEO of Museums Victoria in Australia from 2002 to 2017.

Faculty of Human, Social, and Political Science, University of Cambridge

The Faculty of Human, Social, and Political Science at the University of Cambridge was created in 2011 out of a merger of the Faculty of Archaeology and Anthropology and the Faculty of Politics, Psychology, Sociology and International Studies. According to the Cambridge HSPS website: graduates pursue careers in "research, the Civil Service, journalism, management consultancy, museums, conservation and heritage management, national and international NGOs and development agencies, the Law, teaching, publishing, health management, and public relations."

Norman Hammond is a British archaeologist, academic and Mesoamericanist scholar, noted for his publications and research on the pre-Columbian Maya civilization.

Museum of Classical Archaeology, Cambridge University Museum in Cambridge

The Museum of Classical Archaeology is a museum in Cambridge, run by the Faculty of Classics of the University of Cambridge, England. Since 1983, it has been located in a purpose-built gallery on the first floor of the Faculty of Classics on the Sidgwick Site of the University.

Virtual Teaching Collection

The Virtual Teaching Collection (VTC) project at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology within the University of Cambridge, led by Dr Robin Boast, ran from 1994 to 1997 and was part of the Teaching and Learning Technology Project funded by the Higher Education Funding Council for England.

Antioch mosaics

The Antioch mosaics are a grouping of over 300 mosaic floors created around the 3rd century AD, and discovered during archaeological excavations of Antioch between 1932 and 1939 by a consortium of five museums and institutions. About half of the mosaics are housed at the Hatay Archaeology Museum in Antakya, with others currently residing at the Worcester Art Museum, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Baltimore Museum of Art, Harvard University and Princeton University Art Museum among others. The mosaics range in design from realistic imagery and scenes, to purely geometric patterns.

The Designation Scheme is an English system that awards "Designated status" to museum, library and archive collections of national and international importance. The Scheme is administered by Arts Council England (ACE). As of 2020, 152 collections are officially designated. National museums are not eligible for Designated status.

References

  1. "About us | University of Cambridge". Cam.ac.uk. 25 January 2013. Retrieved 24 May 2014.