Up Pops the Devil

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Up Pops the Devil
Directed by A. Edward Sutherland
Written by Frances Goodrich (play)
Albert Hackett (play)
Arthur Kober
Eve Unsell
Starring Norman Foster
Carole Lombard
Cinematography Karl Struss
Distributed by Paramount Pictures
Release date
  • May 20, 1931 (1931-05-20)
Running time
85 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

Up Pops the Devil is a 1931 American pre-Code film directed by A. Edward Sutherland. The screenplay concerns an advertising man (Norman Foster) who quits his job to become a novelist, upsetting his wife (Carole Lombard) and straining their marriage. The film was released by Paramount Pictures. [1] The screenplay is based on a 3-act play of the same name written by Albert Hackett and Frances Goodrich; the play ran on Broadway for 148 performances from September 1930 to January 1931 at the Theatre Masque. [2]

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References

  1. Hall, Mordaunt (May 16, 1931). "Movie Review". NY Times.
  2. "Up Pops the Devil". Internet Broadway Database (ibdb.com).