Vavasour baronets

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There have been five baronetcies created for persons with the surname Vavasour, three in the Baronetage of England and two in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom. As of 2008 four of the creations are extinct while one is extant.

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The Vavasour Baronetcy, of Hazlewood in the County of York, was created in the Baronetage of England on 24 October 1628 for Thomas Vavasour. The title became extinct on the death of the seventh Baronet in 1826.

Hazlewood Castle Grade I listed hotel in Selby, United Kingdom

Hazlewood Castle is a country residence, now a hotel, in North Yorkshire, England, by the A1 and A64 between Aberford and Tadcaster. It is one of the oldest fortified houses to survive in the whole of Yorkshire.

The Vavasour Baronetcy, of Killingthorpe in the County of Lincoln, was created in the Baronetage of England on 22 June 1631 for Charles Vavasour. The title became extinct on his death in 1644.

The Vavasour Baronetcy, of Copmanthorpe in the County of York, was created in the Baronetage of England on 17 July 1643 for William Vavasour. The title became extinct on his death in 1659.

The Vavasour Baronetcy, of Spaldington in the County of York, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 20 March 1801 for Henry Vavasour. The title became extinct on the death of the third Baronet in 1912.

The Vavasour Baronetcy, of Hazlewood in the County of York, was created in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom on 14 February 1828 for Edward Vavasour. He was the third son of Charles Stourton, 17th Baron Stourton (see Baron Stourton for earlier history of the family), and the maternal cousin of the seventh and last Vavasour Baronet of the 1628 creation. He succeeded to the Vavasour estates and assumed by Royal licence the surname of Vavasour. As a descendant of the seventeenth Baron Stourton the present holder of the baronetcy is also in remainder to this title as well as to the baronies of Mowbray and Segrave.

Baron Stourton

Baron Stourton is a title in the Peerage of England, It was created by writ in 1448 for John Stourton. In 1878, the ancient barony of Mowbray was called out of abeyance in favour of the twentieth Baron Stourton. About two weeks later, the barony of Segrave was also called out of abeyance in his favour. Thereafter, the three baronies have remained united. The formal title is Baron Mowbray, Segrave and Stourton.

Baron Mowbray

Baron Mowbray is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created by writ for Roger de Mowbray in 1283. It was held for a long time by the Mowbray and Howard Dukes of Norfolk. The title was united with the Barony of Segrave in 1368, when John Mowbray, 1st Earl of Nottingham and 5th Baron Mowbray succeeded to that title. Then, it became united with the Dukedom of Norfolk. The two titles were frequently separated due to the attainders of the Dukes of Norfolk, and were later reunited upon the Dukes' restorations. The final separation occurred with the death of the ninth Duke, when the barony of Mowbray fell into abeyance. Thereafter, it was united with the Barony of Stourton after it, and the barony of Segrave, were brought out of abeyance in the nineteenth century in favour of the twentieth Baron Stourton. The baronies of Mowbray and Segrave were shortly separated, as the barony of Segrave was called out of abeyance about two weeks after the barony of Mowbray. The Mowbray Barons become Premier Baron of England when the only older title, that of the Barony of de Ros is held by a woman.

Baron Segrave

Baron Segrave (Seagrave) is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created by writ in 1295 for Nicholas de Segrave, and the title is drawn from a village in Leicestershire now spelled Seagrave.

Vavasour baronets, of Hazlewood (1628)

Vavasour baronets, of Killingthorpe (1631)

Vavasour baronets, of Copmanthorpe (1643)

Vavasour baronets, of Spaldington (1801)

Vavasour baronets, of Hazlewood (1828)

Vavasour baronets
quarterly Vavasour & Stourton Vavasour.svg
Vavasour baronets
quarterly Vavasour & Stourton

Sir Geoffrey William Vavasour, 5th Baronet was an Irish-born English first-class cricketer and Royal Navy officer. He served in the Second World War with distinction, where he was mentioned in dispatches and awarded the Distinguished Service Cross. After the war he played first-class cricket for the Combined Services cricket team. He succeeded his father as the 6th Baronet of Hazelwood in 1961.

The heir apparent to the baronetcy is Joseph Ian Hugh Andre Vavasour (born 1978), eldest son of the 6th Baronet.

An heir apparent or heiress apparent is a person who is first in a line of succession and cannot be displaced from inheriting by the birth of another person. An heir presumptive, by contrast, is someone who is first in line to inherit a title but who can be displaced by the birth of a more eligible heir.

See also

Notes

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