Watkins (surname)

Last updated

Watkins is an English and Welsh surname derived as a patronymic from Watkin, in turn a diminutive of the name Watt (also Wat), a popular Middle English given name itself derived as a pet form of the name Walter.

English language West Germanic language

English is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and eventually became a global lingua franca. It is named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to the area of Great Britain that later took their name, as England. Both names derive from Anglia, a peninsula in the Baltic Sea. The language is closely related to Frisian and Low Saxon, and its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse, and to a greater extent by Latin and French.

Welsh language Brythonic language spoken natively in Wales

Welsh ; [kʰəmˈraiɡ](listen)) or y Gymraeg is a Brittonic language of the Celtic branch of the Indo-European language family. It is spoken natively in Wales, by some in England, and in Y Wladfa. Historically, it has also been known in English as "Cambrian", "Cambric" and "Cymric".

A surname, family name, or last name is the portion of a personal name that indicates a person's family. Depending on the culture, all members of a family unit may have identical surnames or there may be variations based on the cultural rules.

Notable people with the surname include:

Aaron S. Watkins American politician

Aaron Sherman Watkins, born in Ohio, was a president of Asbury College in Kentucky. Before his ordination as a Methodist minister, he practiced law with his brother. He was the grandfather of Prohibition candidate for Vice President of the United States, W. Dean Watkins.

Alan Rhun Watkins was for over 50 years a British political columnist in various London-based magazines and newspapers. He also wrote about wine and rugby.

Alfred Watkins English author, archaeologist, antiquarian and businessman

Alfred Watkins was an English author, self-taught amateur archaeologist, antiquarian and businessman who, while standing on a hillside in Herefordshire, England, in 1921 experienced a revelation and noticed on the British landscape the apparent arrangement of straight lines positioned along ancient features, and subsequently coined the term "ley", now usually referred to as ley line, because the line passed through places whose names contained the syllable "ley".

See also

Atkins is a surname of English origin. At the time of the British Census of 1881, its frequency was highest in Buckinghamshire, followed by Huntingdonshire, Leicestershire, Warwickshire, Rutland, Kent, Dorset, Norfolk, and Berkshire. Atkins may refer to:

Watkin is an English surname formed as a diminutive of the name Watt, a popular Middle English given name itself derived as a pet form of the name Walter. First found in a small Welsh village in 1629.

Watkinson is a surname of English origin. At the time of the British Census of 1881 Watkinson Surname at Forebears, its frequency was highest in Nottinghamshire, followed by Cambridgeshire, Derbyshire, Yorkshire, Lancashire, Suffolk, Lincolnshire, Essex and Cheshire. The name Watkinson may apply to:

Related Research Articles

Cook (surname) Surname list

Cook is a surname of English origin. Notable people with the surname include:

Davies is a patronymic Welsh surname. It may be a corruption of Dyfed, itself a corruption of Dési, colonists from south-east Ireland who occupied the old tribal area of the Demetae in south-west Wales in the late third century AD, establishing a dynasty which lasted five centuries. Dyfed is recorded as a surname as late as the 12th century for e.g. Gwynfard Dyfed, born in 1175. 'Dafydd' appears as a given name in the 13th Century, e.g. Dafydd ap Gruffydd (1238–1283), Prince of Wales, and Dafydd ab Edmwnd, Welsh poet. The given name 'Dafydd' is generally translated into English as 'David'. Alternatively it may derive from David, the name of Wales's patron saint. In Wales Davies is standardly pronounced DAY-vis, that is, identically to Davis. This pronunciation is also used by many outside the United Kingdom, where it competes with the spelling pronunciation DAY-veez, which is particularly common in the US.

White is a surname either of English or of Scottish and Irish origin, the latter being an anglicisation of the Scottish Gaelic MacGillebhàin, "Son of the fair gillie" and the Irish "Mac Faoitigh" or "de Faoite". It is the seventeenth most common surname in England. In the 1990 United States Census, "White" ranked fourteenth among all reported surnames in frequency, accounting for 0.28% of the population. By 2000, White had fallen to position 20 in the United States and 22nd position by 2014

Trevor is a given name and surname of Welsh and Irish origin.

The surname Watt may refer to:

The surname Collins has a variety of likely origins in Britain and Ireland:

  1. Anglo-Saxon: A patronymic surname based on the name Colin, an English diminutive form of Nicholas. In England, Collins usually signified "son of Colin."
  2. Irish: "cuilein" = darling, a term of endearment applied to a whelp or young animal. The medieval surname was Ua Cuiléin, which has usually become Ó Coileáin today.
  3. Welsh: Collen = hazel, hazel grove.

May is a surname of Germanic (Saxon) and, independently, of Gaelic origin. There are many variants used in English-speaking countries, as well as several variants used in Germany. The Scottish May is a sept of Clan Donald. The surname "May" remains a common surname in the United States, England, Scotland, Ireland, Canada, Germany, Australia and New Zealand, as well as among Russians of German origin; possibly also persisting in areas of the Netherlands and France. People with the surname May include:

James is a common surname with many origins. Notable people with the surname include:

Griffiths is a surname with Welsh origins, as in Gruffydd ap Llywelyn Fawr. People called Griffiths recorded here include:

Morris is a surname of various origins though mostly of English, Irish, Scottish and Welsh origin. The name in some cases can be of German origin and even an Americanization of several Jewish surnames. The surname ranked 53 out of 88,799 in the United States and 32 out of 500 in England and Wales.

Hughes is an Anglicized spelling of the Welsh and Irish patronymic surname of French origin. The surname may also be the etymologically unrelated Picard variant "Hugh" of the Germanic name "Hugo".

Thomas is a common surname of English, Welsh, Scottish, French, German, Dutch, and Danish origin.

Walters is a surname of English origin. It used to denote "Son of Walter", derived from the given name Walter, which was introduced into England and Wales about the time of the Norman Conquest. The name "Walter" originates from the Old German wald ("rule") + heri ("warrior").

Baker is a famous surname of Old English (Anglo-Saxon) origin. From England the surname has spread to neighbouring countries such as Wales, Scotland and Ireland, and also to the English speaking areas of the Americas and Oceania where it is also common. An occupational name, which originated before the 8th century CE, from the name of the trade, baker. From the Middle English bakere and Old English bæcere, a derivation of bacan, meaning "to dry by heat." The bearer of this name may not only have been a baker of bread. The name was also used for others involved with baking in some way, including the owner of a communal oven in humbler communities, "baker". The female form of the name is "Baxter". which is seen more in Scotland. The old german form of the name ist "Bäcker"

Barrett is a surname that has been associated with several different people, places and organisations. Barrett is a popular Irish surname, in both south-east and south-west Ireland. It is most common in the Irish counties of Mayo and Galway but particularly County Cork, and within England, East Anglia, especially Norfolk. The Gaelic version of the name is Barόid in the south and Bairéid in the west. The Barretts of Ireland first appeared following the Norman invasion. As with many other Anglo-Norman families, they were quickly assimilated into Irish culture. Another translation for Barrett is "warlike people."

Phillips is an English surname that is mostly referred to as a patronymic surname that derives from the given name Philip.

Day is a surname. Notable people with the surname Day include: