Wattstown Barrows

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Wattstown Barrows
Dumhaí Bhaile Bhatt
Ireland adm location map.svg
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Shown within Ireland
Location Wattstown, Portloman,
County Westmeath, Ireland
Coordinates 53°34′32″N7°26′08″W / 53.575590°N 7.435572°W / 53.575590; -7.435572 Coordinates: 53°34′32″N7°26′08″W / 53.575590°N 7.435572°W / 53.575590; -7.435572
Type tumuli
History
Material earth
Founded c. 3000–2000 BC
Site notes
Ownership State
Designation
Designations
Official name Wattstown Barrows
Reference no. 606

Wattstown Barrows are two tumuli (barrows) which form a National Monument in County Westmeath, Ireland. [1]

County Westmeath County in the Republic of Ireland

County Westmeath is a county in Ireland. It is in the province of Leinster and is part of the Midlands Region. It originally formed part of the historic Kingdom of Meath. It was named Mide because the kingdom was located in the geographical centre of Ireland. Westmeath County Council is the administrative body for the county, and the county town is Mullingar. At the 2016 census, the population of the county was 88,770.

Republic of Ireland Ireland, a country in north-western Europe, occupying 5/6 of the island of Ireland; succeeded the Irish Free State (1937)

Ireland, also known as the Republic of Ireland, is a country in north-western Europe occupying 26 of 32 counties of the island of Ireland. The capital and largest city is Dublin, which is located on the eastern side of the island. Around a third of the country's population of 4.8 million people resides in the greater Dublin area. The sovereign state shares its only land border with Northern Ireland, a part of the United Kingdom. It is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the Celtic Sea to the south, St George's Channel to the south-east, and the Irish Sea to the east. It is a unitary, parliamentary republic. The legislature, the Oireachtas, consists of a lower house, Dáil Éireann, an upper house, Seanad Éireann, and an elected President who serves as the largely ceremonial head of state, but with some important powers and duties. The head of government is the Taoiseach, who is elected by the Dáil and appointed by the President; the Taoiseach in turn appoints other government ministers.

Contents

Location

Wattstown Barrows are located near the summit of Frewin Hill (173 m / 568 ft high), overlooking Lough Owel to the east. [2]

Lough Owel lake in Ireland

Lough Owel is a mesotrophic lough in the Midlands of Ireland, situated north of Mullingar, the county town of Westmeath. It has a maximum depth of 22m. Water from Lough Owel feeds the Royal Canal, a canal crossing Ireland from Dublin to the River Shannon. Access to the lake can be gained from a carpark and pier to the south of the N4 Mullingar to Longford route.

Description

Wattstown Barrows are a ring barrow and bowl barrow, burial sites of the Bronze Age, joined together by extending a bank and ditch from the ring barrow in an arc around the bowl barrow. There is also another bowl barrow and a tumulus or cairn. [3]

Bowl barrow Ancient funerary monument, the most numerous form of round barrow

A bowl barrow is a type of burial mound or tumulus. A barrow is a mound of earth used to cover a tomb. The bowl barrow gets its name from its resemblance to an upturned bowl. Related terms include cairn circle, cairn ring, howe, kerb cairn, tump and rotunda grave.

Atlantic Bronze Age

The Atlantic Bronze Age is a cultural complex of the Bronze Age period of approximately 1300–700 BC that includes different cultures in Portugal, Andalusia, Galicia, France, Britain and Ireland.

Cairn man-made pile of stones or burial monument

A cairn is a man-made pile of stones. The word cairn comes from the Scottish Gaelic: càrn[ˈkʰaːrˠn̪ˠ].

According to legend, Frewin Hill was the site of the Battle of Frémainn in AD 507, where Failge Berraide defeated Fiachu mac Néill. [4]

Failge Berraide was a King of the Uí Failge of County Offaly.

Fiachu mac Néill was a king of Uisnech in Mide of the Ui Neill dynasty. He was the son of the high king Niall Noígíallach. According to the king list in the Book of Leinster, he succeeded his brother Conall Cremthainne as king of Uisnech.

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References