WaveBurner

Last updated
WaveBurner
Developer(s) Apple Inc.
Stable release
1.6.1 / November 4, 2009;8 years ago (2009-11-04)
Operating system Mac OS X v10.6/Mac OS X v10.4
Type Multimedia Content Creator
License Proprietary
Website Apple’s Logic Utilities page

WaveBurner is a Mac OS X professional application (proapp) bundled with Logic Studio for assembling, mastering, and burning audio CDs. Audio CDs created with WaveBurner can be played back on any audio CD player, and can be used as premasters to produce CDs in large numbers for possible distribution.

In Apple Inc software, a proapp is a professional application that has a distinctly different-looking GUI and look and feel from normal Apple applications and other software run on Mac OS X.

Logic Studio software

Logic Studio was a music production suite by Apple Inc. The first version of Logic Studio was unveiled on September 12, 2007. It claims to be the largest collection of modeled instruments, sampler instruments, effect plug-ins, and audio loops ever put in a single application.

PMCD is a specially formatted, recordable Compact Disc designed to be sent to a CD pressing plant for replication. The PreMaster CD format, developed in the early 1990s by the CD-ROM division of Sony, in cooperation with "START Lab Inc." of Tokyo and Sonic Solutions, contained a hidden “PreMaster Cue Sheet” that held the metadata needed for replication that a Red Book CD-DA lacks. The PreMaster CD format made use of the fact that not all data-recording surfaces are specified for use in the Red Book CD-DA or Yellow Book CD-ROM standards. CD transports were not able to recover the data hidden in the Cue Sheet unless forced to buy proprietary software. The Cue Sheet specified a broad range of metadata, including number of channels, per track pre-emphasis status, per track copy protection bit setting, per track ISRC Codes, per disc UPC/EAN, etc.

Features

WaveBurner has several notable features:

The International Standard Recording Code (ISRC) is an international standard code for uniquely identifying sound recordings and music video recordings. The code was developed by the recording industry in conjunction with the ISO technical committee 46, subcommittee 9, which codified the standard as ISO 3901 in 1986, and updated it in 2001.

CD-Text is an extension of the Red Book Compact Disc specifications standard for audio CDs. It allows for storage of additional information on a standards-compliant audio CD.

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