Wings (Mark Chesnutt album)

Last updated
Wings
Mark wings.jpg
Studio album by
ReleasedOctober 3, 1995 (1995-10-03)
Recorded1994-1995
Genre Country
Length32:54
Label Decca
Producer Tony Brown
Mark Chesnutt chronology
What a Way to Live
(1994)
Wings
(1995)
Greatest Hits
(1996)
Singles from Wings
  1. "Trouble"
    Released: September 12, 1995
  2. "It Wouldn't Hurt to Have Wings"
    Released: December 18, 1995
  3. "Wrong Place, Wrong Time"
    Released: May 4, 1996
Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
Allmusic Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar half.svg [1]
Entertainment Weekly (B+) [2]

Wings is the sixth studio album released by American country music artist Mark Chesnutt, and his second for Decca Records. Released in late 1995, it features the singles "Trouble", "It Wouldn't Hurt to Have Wings", and "Wrong Place, Wrong Time". Respectively, these reached #18, #7, and #37 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs charts. Unlike Chesnutt's first five albums, which were produced by Mark Wright, Wings was produced by Tony Brown. This was the first album of Chesnutt's career not to achieve RIAA certification.

Country music, also known as country and western, and hillbilly music, is a genre of popular music that originated in the southern United States in the early 1920s. It takes its roots from genres such as folk music and blues.

Mark Chesnutt American singer-songwriter

Mark Nelson Chesnutt is an American country music singer. Between 1990 and 2002, he had his greatest chart success recording for Universal Music Group Nashville's MCA and Decca branches, with a total of eight albums between those two labels. During this timespan, Chesnutt also charted twenty Top 10 hits on the Billboard Hot Country Songs charts, of which eight reached No. 1: "Brother Jukebox", "I'll Think of Something", "It Sure Is Monday", "Almost Goodbye", "I Just Wanted You to Know", "Gonna Get a Life", "It's a Little Too Late", and a cover of Aerosmith's "I Don't Want to Miss a Thing". His first three albums for MCA along with a 1996 Greatest Hits package issued on Decca are all certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA); 1994's What a Way to Live, also issued on Decca, is certified gold. After a self-titled album in 2002 on Columbia Records, Chesnutt has continued to record predominantly on independent labels.

Decca Records US/British record label

Decca Records is a British record label established in 1929 by Edward Lewis. Its U.S. label was established in late 1934 by Lewis, along with American Decca's first president Jack Kapp and later American Decca president Milton Rackmil. In 1937, anticipating Nazi aggression leading to World War II, Lewis sold American Decca and the link between the UK and U.S. Decca labels was broken for several decades. The British label was renowned for its development of recording methods, while the American company developed the concept of cast albums in the musical genre. Both wings are now part of the Universal Music Group, which is owned by Vivendi, a media conglomerate headquartered in Paris, France. The US Decca label was the foundation company that evolved into UMG.

Contents

"The King of Broken Hearts" was previously recorded by George Strait on the soundtrack of the 1992 film Pure Country , and was later covered by Lee Ann Womack on her 2008 album Call Me Crazy . "Trouble" was originally recorded by Todd Snider on his 1994 debut album Songs for the Daily Planet .

George Strait American country music singer

George Harvey Strait Sr. is an American country music singer, songwriter, actor, and music producer. George Strait is known as the "King of Country" and is considered one of the most influential and popular recording artists of all time. He is known for his neotraditionalist country style, cowboy look, and being one of the first and main country artists to bring country music back to its roots and away from the pop country era in the 1980s.

Lee Ann Womack American country music singer and songwriter

Lee Ann Womack is an American country music singer and songwriter. Her 2000 single, "I Hope You Dance" was a major crossover music hit, reaching No. 1 on the Billboard Country Chart and the Top 15 of the Billboard Hot 100, becoming her signature song.

<i>Call Me Crazy</i> 2008 studio album by Lee Ann Womack

Call Me Crazy is the seventh studio album by country music singer Lee Ann Womack, released on October 21, 2008 via MCA Nashville Records. It is her first studio release in three years, as her previous album was not released. The lead-off single to this album is "Last Call" which in late 2008 became Womack's first Top 20 country hit in three years. The album's second single, "Solitary Thinkin", was released in April 2009 and reached the Top 40 of the country charts, peaking at #39 in June 2009. The album was nominated for the Grammy Award for Best Country Album on December 2, 2009.

Track listing

  1. "As the Honky Tonk Turns" (Mark Chesnutt, Roger Springer, Tommy Nixon) - 3:39
  2. "The King of Broken Hearts" (Jim Lauderdale) - 3:03
  3. "Trouble" (Todd Snider) - 3:34
  4. "(I Think) I've Finally Broken Mine" (Johnny MacRae, Steve Clark) - 3:19
  5. "Wrong Place, Wrong Time" (Jimmy Stewart, Scott Miller) - 3:33
  6. "I May Be a Fool" (Lauderdale, Clay Blaker) - 2:49
  7. "It Wouldn't Hurt to Have Wings" (Jerry Foster, Roger LaVoie, Johnny Morris) - 3:12
  8. "Pride's Not Hard to Swallow" (Jerry Chesnut) - 3:20
  9. "Settlin' for What They Get" (Mack Vickery) - 3:25
  10. "Strangers" (Springer, Chesnutt, Aimee Mayo) - 3:00

Personnel

Electric guitar electrified guitar; fretted stringed instrument with a neck and body that uses a pickup to convert the vibration of its strings into electrical signals

An electric guitar is a guitar that uses one or more pickups to convert the vibration of its strings into electrical signals. The vibration occurs when a guitar player strums, plucks, fingerpicks, slaps or taps the strings. The pickup generally uses electromagnetic induction to create this signal, which being relatively weak is fed into a guitar amplifier before being sent to the speaker(s), which converts it into audible sound.

Paul Franklin (musician) American musician

Paul V. Franklin is an American multi-instrumentalist, known mainly for his work as a steel guitarist. He began his career in the 1970s as a member of Barbara Mandrell's road band; in addition he toured with Vince Gill, Mel Tillis, Jerry Reed and Dire Straits. He has since become a prolific session musician in Nashville, Tennessee, playing on more than 500 albums. He has been named by the Academy of Country Music as Best Steel Guitarist on several occasions. In addition to the pedal steel guitar and lap steel guitar, Franklin plays Dobro, fiddle, and drums, as well as three custom-built instruments called the Pedabro, The Box, and the baritone steel guitar.

Steel guitar type of guitar or the method of playing the instrument

Steel guitar is a type of guitar or the method of playing the instrument. Developed in Hawaii by Joseph Kekuku in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, a steel guitar is usually positioned horizontally; strings are plucked with one hand, while the other hand changes the pitch of one or more strings with the use of a bar or slide called a steel. The earliest use of an electrified steel guitar was first made in the early 1930s by Bob Dunn of Milton Brown and His Brownies, a western swing band from Fort Worth, Texas; the instrument was perfected in the mid to late 1930s by Fort Worth's Leon McAuliffe, who played for western swing band Bob Wills and His Texas Playboys. Nashville later picked up the use of the steel guitar in the early days of the late 1940s and early 1950s "Honky Tonk" country & western music with a number of fine steel guitarists backing names like Hank Williams, Lefty Frizzell and Webb Pierce. The term steel guitar is often mistakenly used to describe any metal body resophonic guitar.

Chart performance

Chart (1995)Peak
position
U.S. Billboard Top Country Albums24
U.S. Billboard 200116
Canadian RPM Country Albums11

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References

  1. Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. Wings at AllMusic
  2. Entertainment Weekly review