Woodstock Letters

Last updated

Woodstock Letters
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish (primarily)
DisciplineEcclesiastical
Publisher Woodstock College
Published1872–1969
No. of books317
OCLC 1019824932

The Woodstock Letters were a periodical publication by the Society of Jesus. Originally published by Woodstock College in Maryland, the letters were intended for distribution among of the Jesuits in North America and later South America. They recounted the Society's works, obituaries of fellow Jesuits, pertinent events, histories of Jesuit institutions, and book reviews. The letters were first published in 1872 and counted 317 volumes before being discontinued in 1969. [1] [2]

Related Research Articles

Boston College Private research university in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, United States

Boston College (BC) is a private Jesuit research university in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, founded in 1863. Although Boston College is classified as an R1 research university, it still uses the word "college" in its name to reflect its historical position as a small liberal arts college. The university has more than 9,300 full-time undergraduates and nearly 5,000 graduate students. Its main campus is a historic district and features some of the earliest examples of collegiate gothic architecture in North America.

Louis J. Gallagher, SJ was an American Jesuit, known for his educational and literary work.

Jesuit Community Cemetery historic cemetery at Georgetown University

The Jesuit Community Cemetery on the campus of Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. is the final resting place for Jesuits who were affiliated with the university. It was first established in 1808 and was moved to its present location in 1854.

Alphonsus J. Donlon American Jesuit priest

Alphonsus J. Donlon was an American Catholic priest and member of the Society of Jesus who spent his career in priestly ministry and academia, including as president of Georgetown University from 1912 to 1918. Born in Albany, New York, he garnered a reputation as a good student and an exceptional collegiate athlete. As a professor, he went on to lead Georgetown University's sports program, which enjoyed great success. As a result, he became known as the "father of Georgetown athletics." He served as a professor of various sciences at Georgetown University and at Woodstock College, and as president of the former, he oversaw the removal of Georgetown Preparatory School from the university to a separate campus, and proposed the creation of the School of Foreign Service. For a significant portion of his career, he also served as a chaplain to Georgetown Visitation Convent. In his later years, he engaged in pastoral work at St. Francis Xavier Church in New York City and taught at Fordham University.

Charles W. Lyons American Jesuit priest and academic administrator

Charles William Lyons was an American Catholic priest who became the only Jesuit and likely the only educator in the United States to have served as the president of four colleges. Born in Boston, Massachusetts, he attended the local public schools before entering the wool industry. He abandoned his career in industry to enter the Society of Jesus. While a novice in Maryland, he suffered a nervous breakdown and was sent to Georgetown University as prefect. He then resumed his studies at Woodstock College, teaching intermittently at Gonzaga College in Washington, D.C. and Loyola College in Baltimore. After his ordination, he became a professor at St. Francis Xavier College in New York City and at Boston College.

James A. Doonan American Jesuit educator

James Aloysius Doonan was an American Catholic priest and a Jesuit. He served as the president of Georgetown University from 1882 to 1888, during which time he oversaw the completion and naming of Gaston Hall and construction of a new building for the School of Medicine; he also acquired the two cannons in front of Healy Hall. He was a financially successful president as well, having reduced the university's burdensome debt that had accrued during the construction of Healy Hall. He spent his later years teaching and ministering at Boston College and Saint Joseph's College in Philadelphia, as well as at St. Francis Xavier College in New York and at the Catholic Summer School of America.

Anthony F. Ciampi Italian-American Jesuit educator

Anthony F. Ciampi was an Italian-American priest of the Catholic Church and member of the Society of Jesus.

J. Havens Richards American Jesuit educator

Joseph Havens Richards was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit who became a prominent president of Georgetown University, where he instituted major reforms and significantly increased the quality and stature of the university. He was born in Columbus, Ohio, into a prominent family. His father was an Episcopal priest who controversially converted to Catholicism, and had the infant Richards secretly baptized as a Catholic. Richards followed his father to Jersey City and Boston, working with him, until enrolling at Boston College. After three years there, he entered the Society of Jesus, and studied at Woodstock College.

Joseph J. Himmel American Jesuit priest and missionary

Joseph J. Himmel was an American Catholic priest and member of the Society of Jesus. For much of his early life, he was a missionary throughout the northeast United States and retreat master. Later in life, he was president of Gonzaga College and Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

Charles H. Stonestreet 19th-century American Jesuit priest

Charles Henry Stonestreet was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit who served in prominent religious and academic positions, including as provincial superior of the Jesuit Maryland Province and president of Georgetown University. He was born in Maryland and attended Georgetown University, where he co-founded the Philodemic Society. After entering the Society of Jesus and becoming a professor at Georgetown, he led St. John's Literary Institution and St. John the Evangelist Church in Frederick, Maryland. He was appointed president of Georgetown University in 1851, holding the office for two years, during which time he oversaw expansion of the university's library. The First Plenary Council of Baltimore was held at Georgetown during his tenure.

John W. Beschter Luxembourg Jesuit missionary

John William Beschter was a Catholic priest and Jesuit from the Duchy of Luxembourg in the Austrian Netherlands. He emigrated to the United States as a missionary in 1807, where he ministered in rural Pennsylvania and Maryland. Beschter was the last Jesuit pastor of St. Mary's Church in Lancaster, as well as the pastor of St. John the Evangelist Church in Baltimore, Maryland. He was also a priest at several other German-speaking churches in Pennsylvania.

William Feiner German Jesuit missionary

William Feiner was a German Catholic priest and Jesuit who became a missionary to the United States and eventually the president of Georgetown College. Born in Münster, he taught in Jesuit schools in the Holy Roman Empire and Galicia as a young member of the Society of Jesus. He then emigrated to the United States following the restoration of the Society, and took up pastoral work and teaching of theology in Conewago, Pennsylvania before becoming a full-time professor at Georgetown College. There, he also became the second dedicated librarian of Georgetown's library, and ministered to the congregation at Holy Trinity Church. Eventually, Feiner became president of the university in 1826. Despite becoming the leader of an American university, he never mastered the English language. Long plagued by poor health due to tuberculosis, his short-lived presidency came to an end after three years, just weeks before his death.

Enoch Fenwick was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit, who ministered throughout Maryland and became the president of Georgetown College. Descending from one of the original Catholic settlers of the British Maryland Province, he studied at Georgetown College in Washington, D.C. Like his brother and future bishop, Benedict Joseph Fenwick, he entered the priesthood, studying at St. Mary's Seminary, before entering the Society of Jesus, which was suppressed at the time. He was made rector of St. Peter's Pro-Cathedral in Baltimore by Archbishop John Carroll, and remained in the position for ten years. Near the end of his pastorate, he was also made vicar general of the Archdiocese of Baltimore, which involved traveling to say Mass in remote parishes throughout rural Maryland.

Jerome Daugherty American Jesuit educator

Jerome Daugherty was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit who served in many different capacities at Jesuit institutions throughout the northeast United States, eventually becoming president of Georgetown University in 1901. Born in Baltimore, he was educated at Loyola College in Maryland, before entering the Society of Jesus and becoming a member of the first class at Woodstock College. He then taught various subjects, including mathematics, Latin, Ancient Greek, rhetoric, and the humanities in Massachusetts, New York City, and Washington, D.C., and served as minister at many of the institutions there.

John D. Whitney American Jesuit educator

John Dunning Whitney was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit who became president of Georgetown University in 1898. Born in Massachusetts, he joined the United States Navy at the age of sixteen, where he was introduced to Catholicism by way of a book that accidentally came into his possession, and prompted him to become a Catholic. He entered the Society of Jesus and spent the next twenty-five years studying and teaching mathematics at Jesuit institutions around the world, including in Canada, England, Ireland, and around the United States in New York, Maryland, Boston, and Louisiana. He became the vice president of Spring Hill College in Alabama, before being appointed President of Georgetown University.

John B. Creeden 20th-century American Jesuit educator

John B. Creeden was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit, who served in many senior positions at Jesuit universities in the United States. Born in Massachusetts, he attended Boston College, and studied for the priesthood in Maryland and Austria. He taught at Fordham University and then at Georgetown University, where he was made Dean of Georgetown College in 1909, and simultaneously served as principal of Georgetown Preparatory School.

James A. Ward was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit. He taught for many years at Georgetown and at the novitiate in Frederick, Maryland, of which he twice served as rector. He then became the vice president of Georgetown and was influential in the early years of Loyola College in Maryland. From 1857 to 1860, he was the President of Saint Joseph's College. He spent his later years as socius (assistant) to the Jesuit provincial superior in New York City, and teaching.

William J. Devlin American Jesuit and academic administrator

William J. Devlin was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit. Born in New York City, he spent many of his early years in Europe, where he was educated at Stonyhurst College in England. Devlin entered the Society of Jesus in Maryland in 1893, and studied at Woodstock College. He became a professor at Boston College in 1910, and eventually became the dean.

Francis Xavier Talbot was an American Catholic priest and Jesuit who was active in Catholic literary and publishing circles, and became the President of Loyola College in Maryland. Born in Philadelphia, he entered the Society of Jesus in 1906, and was educated at St. Andrew-on-Hudson and Woodstock College. He taught for several years in New York City and at Boston College, before entering publishing as the literary editor of America magazine in 1923, of which he became the editor-in-chief in 1936. While in this role, he was also active in founding and editing several academic journals, including Thought, and establishing various Catholic literary societies and book clubs. During World War II, he was chaplain to a Catholic organization that previewed movies for the National Legion of Decency. He also supported Franco's rule in Spain because of its support of Catholicism and opposition to communism; he also supported the US war effort. He was described as one of the early leaders of the revival of Catholic literature in the United States.

Edward I. Devitt Canadian American Jesuit and historian

Edward Ignatius Devitt was a Canadian American priest, Jesuit, and historian of the American Catholic Church. Born in Saint John, New Brunswick, he moved with his family to Boston, Massachusetts, at a young age. He studied in public schools in the city before enrolling at the College of the Holy Cross. Devitt spent two years there, and then entered the Society of Jesus in 1859. He studied at the novitiate in Frederick, Maryland, and at the newly opened Woodstock College. He briefly taught at the Washington Seminary during his studies, and after graduating, was a professor for the next thirty years at Holy Cross, Woodstock, and Georgetown University.

References

  1. "Woodstock Letters". Jesuit Online Library. Boston College. Archived from the original on February 2, 2019. Retrieved February 2, 2019.
  2. "Woodstock Letters: About this collection". Saint Louis University Libraries Digital Collections. Archived from the original on September 23, 2017. Retrieved February 2, 2019.