Writers Guild of America

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The Writers Guild of America is the joint efforts of two different US labor unions representing TV and film writers:

Common activities

The WGAE and WGAW negotiate contracts in unison as well as launch strike actions simultaneously.

Although each Guild runs independently, they perform some activities in parallel:

See also


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