1987 European Competition for Women's Football

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1987 European Competition for Women's Football
Europamesterskapet i fotball for kvinner 1987
Tournament details
Host countryNorway
Dates11 June – 14 June
Teams4
Venue(s)3 (in 3 host cities)
Final positions
ChampionsFlag of Norway.svg  Norway (1st title)
Runners-upFlag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Third placeFlag of Italy.svg  Italy
Fourth placeFlag of England.svg  England
Tournament statistics
Matches played4
Goals scored13 (3.25 per match)
Attendance14,428 (3,607 per match)
Top scorer(s) Flag of Norway.svg Trude Stendal (3 goals)
Best player(s) Flag of Norway.svg Heidi Støre
1984
1989

The 1987 European Competition for Women's Football took place in Norway. It was won by the hosts in a final against defending champions Sweden. Once again, the competition began with four qualifying groups, but this time a host nation was selected for the semi-final stage onwards after the four semi-finalists were identified. [1]

Norway constitutional monarchy in Northern Europe

Norway, officially the Kingdom of Norway, is a Nordic country in Northwestern Europe whose territory comprises the western and northernmost portion of the Scandinavian Peninsula; the remote island of Jan Mayen and the archipelago of Svalbard are also part of the Kingdom of Norway. The Antarctic Peter I Island and the sub-Antarctic Bouvet Island are dependent territories and thus not considered part of the kingdom. Norway also lays claim to a section of Antarctica known as Queen Maud Land.

Norway womens national football team womens national association football team representing Norway

The Norway women's national football team is controlled by the Football Association of Norway. The team is former European, World and Olympic champions and thus one of the most successful national teams. The team has had less success since the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Sweden women's national football team won the European Competition for Women's Football in 1984, one World Cup-silver (2003), as well as three European Championship-silvers. The team has participated in six Olympic Games, seven World Cups, as well as nine European Championships. Sweden won the bronze medal at the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Contents

Qualification

Squads

For a list of all squads that played in the final tournament, see 1987 European Competition for Women's Football squads

This article lists all the confirmed national football squads for the 1987 European Competition for Women's Football.

Semifinals

Norway  Flag of Norway.svg20Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
Stendal Soccerball shade.svg 40'
Støre Soccerball shade.svg 73'
Report
FIGC Report (in Italian)
NFF Report (in Norwegian)
Ullevaal Stadion, Oslo
Attendance: 5,154
Referee: Eysteinn Guðmundsson (Iceland)
Sweden  Flag of Sweden.svg32 (a.e.t.)Flag of England.svg  England
Börjesson Soccerball shade.svg 32'
Axén Soccerball shade.svg 50', 100'
Report
SvFF Report (in Swedish)
Sherrard Soccerball shade.svg 35'
Davis Soccerball shade.svg 43'
Melløs Stadion, Moss
Attendance: 300
Referee: Michał Listkiewicz (Poland)

Third place playoff

Italy  Flag of Italy.svg2 1Flag of England.svg  England
Morace Soccerball shade.svg 36'
Vignotto Soccerball shade.svg 50'
Report
FIGC Report (in Italian)
Davis Soccerball shade.svg 4' (pen.)

Final

Norway  Flag of Norway.svg21Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden
Stendal Soccerball shade.svg 28', 72' Report [ permanent dead link ]
NFF Report (in Norwegian)
SvFF Report (in Swedish)
Videkull Soccerball shade.svg 73'
Ullevaal Stadion, Oslo
Attendance: 8,408
Referee: Eero Aho (Finland)

Awards

 1987 European Competition for Women's Football Winners 
Flag of Norway.svg
Norway
First title

Goalscorers

3 goals
2 goals
1 goal

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References

  1. "1987: Norway victorious in Oslo –". Uefa.com. Retrieved 2012-08-23.