1999 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification

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The qualification process for the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup saw 67 teams from the six FIFA confederations compete for the 16 places in the tournament's finals. The places were divided as follows:

1999 FIFA Womens World Cup 1999 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup was the third edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the world championship for women's national association football teams. It was hosted by the United States and took place from 19 June to 10 July 1999 at eight venues across the country. The tournament was the most successful edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup in terms of attendance, television ratings, and public interest.

FIFA International governing body of association football

The Fédération Internationale de Football Association is an organization which describes itself as an international governing body of association football, fútsal, beach soccer, and efootball. FIFA is responsible for the organization of football's major international tournaments, notably the World Cup which commenced in 1930 and the Women's World Cup which commenced in 1991.

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Confederation of African Football governing body of association football in Africa

The Confederation of African Football or CAF is the administrative and controlling body for African association football.

Asian Football Confederation governing body of association football in Asia

The Asian Football Confederation (AFC) is the governing body of association football in Asia and Australia. It has 47 member countries, mostly located on the Asian and Australian continent, but excludes the transcontinental countries with territory in both Europe and Asia – Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Russia, and Turkey – which are instead members of UEFA. Three other states located geographically along the western fringe of Asia – Cyprus, Armenia and Israel – are also UEFA members. On the other hand, Australia, formerly in the OFC, joined the Asian Football Confederation in 2006, and the Oceanian island of Guam, a territory of the United States, is also a member of AFC, in addition to Northern Mariana Islands, one of the Two Commonwealths of the United States. Hong Kong and Macau, although not independent countries, are also members of the AFC.

UEFA international sport governing body

The Union of European Football Associations is the administrative body for association football, futsal and beach soccer in Europe, although several member states are primarily or entirely located in Asia. It is one of six continental confederations of world football's governing body FIFA. UEFA consists of 55 national association members.

Qualified teams

TeamQualificationDate of
qualification
World Cup
appearances
Last appearance
Flag of the United States.svg  United States Hosts31 May 19963rd1995
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 1st place, AFC14 December 19973rd1995
Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 2nd place, AFC14 December 19971stDebut
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 3rd place, AFC14 December 19973rd1995
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 1st place, CONMEBOL15 March 19983rd1995
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy UEFA Group 2 winner27 June 19982nd1991
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway UEFA Group 3 winner15 August 19983rd1995
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark UEFA Group 4 winner29 August 19983rd1995
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden UEFA Group 1 winner30 August 19983rd1995
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 1st place, CONCACAF6 September 19983rd1995
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia Playoff winner, UEFA11 October 19981stDebut
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Playoff winner, UEFA11 October 19983rd1995
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 1st place, OFC17 October 19982nd1995
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 1st place, CAF31 October 19983rd1995
Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 2nd place, CAF31 October 19981stDebut
Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico 2nd place, CONCACAF
(Winner of play-off)
19 December 19981stDebut

Qualification groups

Africa (CAF)

Qualified:Flag of Nigeria.svg  NigeriaFlag of Ghana.svg  Ghana

The two African teams to qualify to the World Cup were the two finalists of the 1998 CAF Women's Championship, Nigeria and Ghana.

The Nigeria national women's football team, nicknamed the Super Falcons, is the national team of Nigeria and is controlled by the Nigeria Football Federation.

Ghana womens national football team womens national association football team representing Ghana

The Ghana women's national football team is the national team of Ghana and is controlled by the Ghana Football Association. They are nicknamed the Black Queens.

Asia (AFC)

Qualified:Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PRFlag of Japan.svg  JapanFlag of North Korea.svg  North Korea

The three Asian teams to qualify to the World Cup were the two finalists and the third-placed of the 1997 AFC Women's Championship.

The 1997 AFC Women's Championship was a women's football tournament held in the province Guangdong, China between 5 and 14 December 1997. It was the 11th staging of the AFC Women's Championship. The 1997 AFC Women's Championship, consisting of eleven teams, served as the AFC's qualifying tournament for the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup. Asia's three berths were given to the two finalists - China and Korea DPR - and the winner of the third place play-off, Japan.

Europe (UEFA)

Qualified:Flag of Sweden.svg  SwedenFlag of Russia.svg  RussiaFlag of Germany.svg  GermanyFlag of Norway.svg  NorwayFlag of Denmark.svg  DenmarkFlag of Italy.svg  Italy

The 16 teams belonging to Class A of European women's football were drawn into four groups, from which the group winners qualify for the World Cup. The four runners-up were drawn into two home-and-away knock-out matches, winners of those matches also qualifying.

North, Central America and the Caribbean (CONCACAF)

Qualified:Flag of the United States.svg  United StatesFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  CanadaFlag of Mexico.svg  Mexico

The 1998 CONCACAF's Women's Championship winner Canada qualified for the FIFA Women's World Cup 1999. The runner-up Mexico qualified in two playoff-matches against the second-placed team of CONMEBOLArgentina. The United States qualified as hosts.

Canada womens national soccer team womens national association football team representing Canada

The Canada women's national soccer team is overseen by the Canadian Soccer Association and competes in the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF).

Mexico womens national football team womens national association football team representing Mexico

The Mexico women's national football team is governed by La Federación Mexicana de Fútbol.

CONMEBOL governing body of association football in South America

The South American Football Confederation is the continental governing body of football in South America and it is one of FIFA's six continental confederations. The oldest continental confederation in the world, its headquarters are located in Luque, Paraguay, near Asunción. CONMEBOL is responsible for the organization and governance of South American football's major international tournaments. With 10 member football associations, it has the fewest members of all the confederations in FIFA.

Oceania (OFC)

Qualified:Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia

The 1998 OFC Women's Championship determined the OFC's one qualifier for the FIFA Women's World Cup 1999 – the winner Australia.

The 1998 OFC Women's Championship, also known as the VI Ladies Oceania Nations Cup was held in Auckland, New Zealand between 9 October & 17 October 1998. It was the sixth staging of the OFC Women's Championship. The 1998 OFC Women's Championship, like its previous edition, served as the OFC's qualifying tournament for the 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup. OFC's only berth was given to the winner – Australia.

Oceania Football Confederation body for association football in Oceania

The Oceania Football Confederation (OFC) is one of the six continental confederations of international association football, consisting of New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Tonga, and other Pacific Island countries. It promotes the game in Oceania and allows the member nations to qualify for the FIFA World Cup.

Australia womens national soccer team womens national association football team representing Australia

The Australian women's national soccer team is overseen by the governing body for soccer in Australia, Football Federation Australia (FFA), which is currently a member of the Asian Football Confederation (AFC) and the regional ASEAN Football Federation (AFF) since leaving the Oceania Football Confederation (OFC) in 2006. The team's official nickname is the Matildas, having been known as the Female Socceroos before 1995.

South America (CONMEBOL)

Qualified:Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil

The third edition of the Sudamericano Femenino (Women's South American Championship) in 1998 determined the CONMEBOL's qualifier. Brazil won the tournament.

Play-offs

The runners-up of CONMEBOL's and CONCACAF's qualifications played for one berth.

Mexico  Flag of Mexico.svg3–1Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina

Argentina  Flag of Argentina.svg2–3Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico

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