2006 Women's Rugby World Cup

Last updated
2006 Women's Rugby World Cup
Coupe du monde de rugby féminin 2006
WomensRWC.png
Tournament details
Host nationFlag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada
Dates2006-08-31 – 2006-09-17
No. of nations12
Champions  Gold medal blank.svg Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand (3rd title)
Tournament statistics
Matches played30
Top scorer(s) Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Heather Moyse (35)
Most tries Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg Heather Moyse (7)
2002
2010

The 2006 Women's Rugby World Cup (officially IRB Rugby World Cup 2006 Canada) took place in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. The tournament began on 31 August and ended on 17 September 2006. The 2006 tournament was the third World Cup approved by the IRB, the previous two being held 2002 in Spain and in the Netherlands, in 1998. The Black Ferns of New Zealand won the 2006 World Cup, defeating England in the final, as they had in 2002. It was New Zealand's third successive title.

Contents

The semi-finals were also direct repeats of the 2002 tournament – in fact five of the top six places in the final rankings were unchanged. Elsewhere the USA advanced from 7th in 2002 to 5th, and Ireland climbed from 14th to 8th while Australia (5th to 7th), Spain (8th to 9th), and Samoa (9th to 10th) slipped down.

The period prior to the competition had not been without controversy. The decision to award the hosting of the competition to Canada ahead of a strong bid from England surprised many.

In addition – apart from in Asia – there were no qualifying tournaments for the 2006 World Cup. Instead teams were invited to take part by the IRB with selection based on performances at the World Cup in 2002 and in international matches between 2002 and 2005. This resulted in accusations of a lack of clarity in regard to some selection decisions. In particular the awarding of the final place in the tournament to Samoa instead of Wales (following a poor performance by Wales in the 2005 Six Nations) was the cause of some controversy and comment prior to the event.

Qualifiers

Asia

[504]
2005-06-03 Hong Kong  Flag of Hong Kong.svg0–78 Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Bangkok [4/17/4]
[505]
2005-06-03 Thailand  Flag of Thailand.svg0–67 Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan Bangkok [1/31/1]
[506]
2005-06-05 Thailand  Flag of Thailand.svg20–18 Flag of Hong Kong.svg  Hong Kong Bangkok [2/5/2]
[507]
2005-06-05 Kazakhstan  Flag of Kazakhstan.svg19–3 Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Bangkok [32/18/1]
Kazakhstan qualify

Tickets and sponsorship

Tickets had been available since July 2006 and they could be purchased online at Ticketmaster or by phone. There were individual and student tickets (for each of six match days), tickets for youth teams and clubs, corporate packages and a special "World Cup Pack" of $125 allowing access to all matches including the finals. [1] [2]
The partners of this tournament were Toyota "Never Quit" Awards Program, Molson, Tait Radio Communications, Glentel, Budget, University of Alberta, Edmonton Airports and Clubfit. The event was covered by English language network Global TV, daily newspaper Edmonton Journal and radio stations CFRN 1260, CFBR 100.3 and CFMG 104.9. [3]
All matches were filmed and for the first time were available via streamed media. [4] The final was also broadcast live on TV in a number of countries, including the United Kingdom, and a one-hour TV highlights programme was produced by IMG for wider distribution, while these recordings are held as part of the IRB's World Cup archive. [5]

Match officials

On July 6, 2006 the IRB Referee Selection Committee announced the appointment of match officials, with twelve women officials selected for the tournament consisting of eight referees and four touch judges. This panel was assisted by experienced international referees George Ayoub, Lyndon Bray, Malcolm Changleng and Simon McDowell, who were appointed in April. [6] Other three touch judges from Canada Rugby Union were included in the final list. [7]

Format

The competition was contested over 18 days between 12 teams, allocated to four pools of three and structured into two parts:

Pool stage

The first three match days saw a cross-pool league system in operation, with Pool A playing Pool D and Pool B playing Pool C, with points going towards one single division table for all four pools. Classification within each pool was based on the following scoring system:

Bonus points were awarded for teams scoring 4 tries or more and losing by 7 points or less. No extra time were played.
Teams were ranked 1–12 on the basis of the most match points. If two teams were equal on match points for any position, then the following criteria would be used in this order until one of the teams could be determined as the higher ranked:

Knockout stage

After three match days, with each team having played three pool matches, positional semifinals were played with the top four-positioned sides vying to make the Women's Rugby World Cup final and all other sides playing matches in the final two rounds to decide tournament rankings.

If no winner could be determined within the time allowed, two teams should have played an extra time of 10 minutes each way with an interval of 5 and then eventually a kicking competition. [8]

Squads

Pools

Pool A

TeamWonDrawnLostForAgainstPoints
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 300137714
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 102141154
Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 00322970

Pool B

TeamWonDrawnLostForAgainstPoints
Flag of England.svg  England 3001191614
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 10288426
IRFU flag.svg  Ireland 10248675

Pool C

TeamWonDrawnLostForAgainstPoints
Flag of France.svg  France 201753710
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 20134359
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 003201790

Pool D

TeamWonDrawnLostForAgainstPoints
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 2011317110
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 201563810
Flag of Samoa.svg  Samoa 10232695

Pool matches

Round one

[559]
2006-08-31 New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg66–7 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Ellerslie Rugby Park, Edmonton [57/43/8]
[560]
2006-08-31 Spain  Flag of Spain.svg0–24 Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland St. Albert Rugby Park, St. Albert [74/96/14]
[561]
2006-08-31 Kazakhstan  Flag of Kazakhstan.svg0–20 Flag of Samoa.svg  Samoa Ellerslie Rugby Park, Edmonton [33/9/2]
[562]
2006-08-31 England  Flag of England.svg18–0 Flag of the United States.svg  United States St. Albert Rugby Park, St. Albert [121/55/6]
[563]
2006-08-31 Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg68–12 Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa Ellerslie Rugby Park, Edmonton [18/7/1]
[564]
2006-08-31 Ireland  IRFU flag.svg0–43 Flag of France.svg  France St. Albert Rugby Park, St. Albert [75/108/12]

Round two

[565]
2006-09-04 New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg50–0 Flag of Samoa.svg  Samoa St. Albert Rugby Park, St. Albert [44/10/1]
[566]
2006-09-04 England  Flag of England.svg74–8 Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa Ellerslie Rugby Park, Edmonton [121/8/2]
[567]
2006-09-04 Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg79–0 Flag of Spain.svg  Spain St. Albert Rugby Park, St. Albert [58/75/1]
[568]
2006-09-04 Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg10–24 Flag of France.svg  France Ellerslie Rugby Park, Edmonton [19/109/2]
[569]
2006-09-04 Kazakhstan  Flag of Kazakhstan.svg17–32 Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland St. Albert Rugby Park, St. Albert [34/97/1]
[570]
2006-09-04 Ireland  IRFU flag.svg11–24 Flag of the United States.svg  United States Ellerslie Rugby Park, Edmonton [76/56/3]

Round three

[571]
2006-09-08 New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg21–0 Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland Ellerslie Rugby Park, Edmonton [45/98/3]
[572]
2006-09-08 Spain  Flag of Spain.svg14–12 Flag of Samoa.svg  Samoa St. Albert Rugby Park, St. Albert [76/11/1]
[573]
2006-09-08 Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg45–5 Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan Ellerslie Rugby Park, Edmonton [59/35/2]
[574]
2006-09-08 England  Flag of England.svg27–8 Flag of France.svg  France St. Albert Rugby Park, St. Albert [122/110/20]
[575]
2006-09-08 Australia  Flag of Australia (converted).svg6–10 Flag of the United States.svg  United States Ellerslie Rugby Park, Edmonton [20/57/3]
[576]
2006-09-08 Ireland  IRFU flag.svg37–0 Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa St. Albert Rugby Park, St. Albert [77/9/1]

Knock-out stages

9th-12th place classification play-offs

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
12 June - St. Albert
 
 
Flag of Samoa.svg  Samoa 43
 
16 June - Edmonton (Ellerslie)
 
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 10
 
Flag of Samoa.svg  Samoa 5
 
12 June - Edmonton (Ellerslie)
 
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 10
 
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 17
 
 
Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 12
 
Third place
 
 
16 June - Edmonton (Ellerslie)
 
 
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 0
 
 
Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 36

Semi-Finals

[581]
2006-09-12 Samoa  Flag of Samoa.svg43–10 Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa St. Albert Rugby Park, St. Albert [12/10/1]
[582]
2006-09-12 Spain  Flag of Spain.svg17–12 Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan Ellerslie Rugby Park, Edmonton [77/1/36]

11th/12th place play-off

[585]
2006-09-16 Kazakhstan  Flag of Kazakhstan.svg36–0 Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa Ellerslie Rugby Park, Edmonton [37/11/1]

9th/10th place play-off

[584]
2006-09-16 Samoa  Flag of Samoa.svg5–10 Flag of Spain.svg  Spain Ellerslie Rugby Park, Edmonton [13/78/2]

5th-8th classification play-offs

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
12 June - St. Albert
 
 
IRFU flag.svg  Ireland 10
 
16 June - Edmonton (Ellerslie)
 
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 11
 
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 0
 
12 June - St. Albert
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 24
 
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 29
 
 
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 12
 
Third place
 
 
16 June - Edmonton (Commonwealth)
 
 
IRFU flag.svg  Ireland 14
 
 
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 18

Semi-Finals

[578]
2006-09-12 Ireland  IRFU flag.svg10–11 Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland St. Albert Rugby Park, St. Albert [78/99/14]
[580]
2006-09-12 United States  Flag of the United States.svg29–12 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia St. Albert Rugby Park, St. Albert [21/58/4]

7th/8th place play-off

[583]
2006-09-16 Ireland  IRFU flag.svg14–18 Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Ellerslie Rugby Park, Edmonton [22/79/2]

5th/6th place play-off

[586]
2006-09-17 Scotland  Flag of Scotland.svg0–24 Flag of the United States.svg  United States Commonwealth Stadium, Edmonton [100/59/5]


Finals

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
12 June - Edmonton (Ellerslie)
 
 
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 40
 
17 June - Edmonton (Commonwealth)
 
Flag of France.svg  France 10
 
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 25
 
12 June - Edmonton (Ellerslie)
 
Flag of England.svg  England 17
 
Flag of England.svg  England 20
 
 
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 14
 
Third place
 
 
17 June - Edmonton (Commonwealth)
 
 
Flag of France.svg  France 17
 
 
Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 8

Semi-Finals

[577]
2006-09-12 New Zealand  Flag of New Zealand.svg40–10 Flag of France.svg  France Ellerslie Rugby Park, Edmonton [46/111/3]
[579]
2006-09-12 Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg14–20 Flag of England.svg  England Ellerslie Rugby Park, Edmonton [60/122/12]

3rd/4th place play-off

[587]
2006-09-17 Canada  Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg8–17 Flag of France.svg  France Commonwealth Stadium, Edmonton [61/112/6]

World Cup Final

[588]
2006-09-17 England  Flag of England.svg17–25 Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Commonwealth Stadium, Edmonton [124/47/10]
 2006 Women's Rugby World Cup Winners 
Flag of New Zealand.svg
New Zealand
Third title

Statistics

Teams

PointsTeamMatchesTriesConversionsPenaltiesDrops Yellow card.svg Red card.svg
202Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 531165000
156Flag of England.svg  England 523135000
153Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 524151000
114Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 51597020
102Flag of France.svg  France 51682010
87Flag of the United States.svg  United States 51471020
80Flag of Samoa.svg  Samoa 51361030
75Flag of Kazakhstan.svg  Kazakhstan 51350020
72IRFU flag.svg  Ireland 51143010
67Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 5953110
41Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 5552030
30Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 5511030

Individual records

Top point scorers

PointsNameTeamPositionAppsTriesConvPenaltiesDrops
35 Heather Moyse Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Fullback57000
34 Emma Jensen Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Scrum-half511030
33 Valuese Sao Taliu Flag of Samoa.svg  Samoa Fullback55400
31 Shelley Rae Flag of England.svg  England Fly-half511020
30 Sue Day Flag of England.svg  England Centre/Wing56000
Maria Gallo Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Centre/Wing56000
Amiria Marsh Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Fullback56000
Tobie McGann Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Fullback/Fly-half52440
29 Kelly McCallum Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Fly-half501310
27 Paula Chalmers Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland Scrum-half51531
25 Tricia Brown Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Wing55000
Catherine Devillers Flag of France.svg  France Wing55000
23 Pam Kosanke Flag of the United States.svg  United States Centre42510
21 Estelle Sartini Flag of France.svg  France Fly-half/Wing52410

Top try scorers

TriesNameTeamPositionAppearances
7 Heather Moyse Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Fullback5
6 Sue Day Flag of England.svg  England Centre/Wing5
Maria Gallo Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Centre/Wing5
Amiria Marsh Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Fullback5
5 Valuese Sao Taliu Flag of Samoa.svg  Samoa Fullback5
Catherine Devillers Flag of France.svg  France Wing5
Tricia Brown Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Wing5
4 Ellie Karvoski Flag of the United States.svg  United States Wing5
Ruan Sims Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Centre/Wing5
3 Stephanie Mortimer Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Wing3
Claire Richardson Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Wing4
Isabel Rodríguez Flag of Spain.svg  Spain Scrum-half5
Jeannette Feighery IRFU flag.svg  Ireland Wing5
Delphine Plantet Flag of France.svg  France Number 85
Charlotte Barras Flag of England.svg  England Wing5
Rochelle Martin Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Flanker5
Melissa Ruscoe Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand Flanker5

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