2007 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification

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Qualification for the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup determined which 15 teams joined China, the hosts of the 2007 tournament, to play for the Women's World Cup. Europe had 5 qualifying berths, Asia 3.5 berths (including the hosts), North and Central America 2.5 berths, Africa 2 berths, South America 2 berths and Oceania 1 berth. The 16th spot was determined through a play-off match between the third-placed teams in North/Central America and Asia.

2007 FIFA Womens World Cup 2007 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup, the fifth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was an international association football competition for women held in China from 10 to 30 September 2007. Originally, China was to host the 2003 edition, but the outbreak of SARS in that country forced that event to be moved to the United States. FIFA immediately granted the 2007 event to China, which meant that no new host nation was chosen competitively until the voting was held for the 2011 Women's World Cup.

China womens national football team womens national association football team representing the Peoples Republic of China

The Chinese women's national football team, recognized as China PR by FIFA, is governed by the Chinese Football Association. The team is colloquially referred to as "Zhōngguó Nǚzú".

FIFA Womens World Cup international association football competition

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China.

Contents

Africa

The 2006 Women's African Football Championship functioned as a qualifying tournament. Originally, this tournament was scheduled to be held in Gabon, but due to "organisational reasons" Gabon withdrew from hosting the competition. [1] 32 teams entered the African Championships and competed for the two available spots, but six withdrew during the qualifying session.

The sport of football in the country of Gabon is run by the Gabonese Football Federation. The association administers the national football team, as well as the national league. Football is the most popular sport in the country.

On 7 November 2006, Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria and Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana qualified by virtue of winning their semifinal matches.

Nigeria womens national football team womens national association football team representing Nigeria

The Nigeria national women's football team, nicknamed the Super Falcons, is the national team of Nigeria and is controlled by the Nigeria Football Federation. They won the first seven African championships and through their first twenty years lost only five games to African competition: December 12, 2002 to Ghana in Warri, June 3, 2007 at Algeria, August 12, 2007 to Ghana in an Olympic qualifier, November 25, 2008 at Equatorial Guinea in the semis of the 2008 Women's African Football Championship and May 2011 at Ghana in an All Africa Games qualification match.

Ghana womens national football team womens national association football team representing Ghana

The Ghana women's national football team is the national team of Ghana and is controlled by the Ghana Football Association. They are nicknamed the Black Queens.

Asia

The 2006 AFC Women's Championship functioned as a qualifying tournament. The tournament was originally scheduled to be held in Japan, but after the Football Federation Australia moved from the Oceania Football Confederation to the Asian Football Confederation, the Australian team entered the qualifying series. They were awarded hosting rights in February 2006. [2] The Championship took place between 16 July 2006 and 30 July 2006. Since Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR, the host nation of Women's World Cup 2007, proceeded to the final, another finalist, Flag of Australia.svg  Australia and third-placed Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea, were qualified for the World Cup finals. Fourth-placed Flag of Japan.svg  Japan qualified for a play-off match with Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico, the third-placed team from the 2006 CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup.

Association football is the second most popular sport in Japan, after Baseball. Its nationwide organization, Japan Football Association, administers the professional football league, J. League, which is the most successful association football league in Asia.

Football Federation Australia sports governing body

Football Federation Australia (FFA) is the governing body of soccer, futsal, and beach soccer within Australia. The FFA is headquartered in Sydney. Although the first governing body of the sport was founded in 1911, FFA in its current form was only established in 1963 as the Australian Soccer Federation. It was later reconstituted in 2003 as the Australian Soccer Association before adopting its current name in 2005.

Oceania Football Confederation body for association football in Oceania

The Oceania Football Confederation (OFC) is one of the six continental confederations of international association football, consisting of New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Fiji, Tonga, and other Pacific Island countries. It promotes the game in Oceania and allows the member nations to qualify for the FIFA World Cup.

Europe

The 25 teams belonging to the First Category of European women's football were drawn into five groups, from which the group winners qualified for the World Cup finals. [3] The qualifiers concluded on 30 September 2006 with Flag of Norway.svg  Norway, Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden, Flag of Germany.svg  Germany, Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark and Flag of England.svg  England qualifying.

Norway womens national football team womens national association football team representing Norway

The Norway women's national football team is controlled by the Football Association of Norway. The team is former European, World and Olympic champions and thus one of the most successful national teams. The team has had less success since the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Sweden women's national football team won the European Competition for Women's Football in 1984, one World Cup-silver (2003), as well as three European Championship-silvers. The team has participated in six Olympic Games, seven World Cups, as well as nine European Championships. Sweden won the bronze medal at the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Germany womens national football team womens national association football team representing Germany

The Germany women's national football team is governed by the German Football Association (DFB).

North America, Central America & Caribbean

The 2006 Women's Gold Cup acted as qualifier tournament for CONCACAF. The tournament finals took place between 19 and 26 November 2006. [4] USA and Canada received direct qualifying spots after contesting the final of the 2002 Gold Cup, while four other spots were determined through regional qualifying.

CONCACAF International sport governing body

The Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football is the continental governing body for association football in North America, which includes Central America and the Caribbean region. Three geographically South American entities — the independent nations of Guyana and Suriname and the French overseas department of French Guiana — are also members. CONCACAF's primary functions are to organize competitions for national teams and clubs, and to conduct World Cup and Women's World Cup qualifying tournaments.

United States womens national soccer team womens national association football team representing the United States

The United States Women's National Soccer Team (USWNT) represents the United States in international women's soccer. The team is the most successful in international women's soccer, winning three Women's World Cup titles, four Olympic women's gold medals, eight CONCACAF Gold Cup wins, and ten Algarve Cups. It medaled in every single World Cup and Olympic tournament in women's soccer history from 1991 to 2015, before being knocked out in the quarterfinal of the 2016 Summer Olympics. The team is governed by United States Soccer Federation and competes in CONCACAF.

Canada womens national soccer team womens national association football team representing Canada

The Canada women's national soccer team is overseen by the Canadian Soccer Association and competes in the Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF).

On 22 November 2006, Flag of the United States.svg  United States and Flag of Canada.svg  Canada qualified by virtue of winning their semifinal matches, while Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico qualified for a play-off match with Flag of Japan.svg  Japan after defeating Jamaica in the 2006 Gold Cup 3rd place match.

Oceania

One spot was awarded to the winner of the 2007 OFC Women's Championship held 9 April through 13 April 2007 in Papua New Guinea. [5]

Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand won this tournament and qualified for the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup. It's the second time they are part of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the other being in 1991.

South America

The 2006 Sudamericano Femenino acted as qualifier for CONMEBOL. Originally, a women's football tournament at the 2006 South American Games in Buenos Aires would serve as qualifier tournament, but the South American Games committee scrapped football from the games, forcing the Argentine Football Association to organize a tournament on short notice. [6]

On 24 November, Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil qualified by earning six points. Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina qualified on 26 November by defeating Brazil and earning a total of 7, thus winning the tournament.

AFC-CONCACAF Play-off

Japan  Flag of Japan.svg 2 0 Flag of Mexico.svg  Mexico
Sawa Soccerball shade.svg 37'
Miyama Soccerball shade.svg 69'
Report
National Stadium, Tokyo
Attendance: 10,107
Referee: Beck (Germany)

Mexico  Flag of Mexico.svg 2 1 Flag of Japan.svg  Japan
Leyva Soccerball shade.svg 18' (pen)
Domínguez Soccerball shade.svg 29'
Report Arakawa Soccerball shade.svg 12'
Estadio Nemesio Díez, Toluca
Attendance: 20,000
Referee: Petignat (Switzerland)

Japan won 3-2 on aggregate and qualified for 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup.

Qualified teams

The following teams qualified for the tournament:

TeamNumber of appearances incl. 2007Record streakFirst appearanceMost recent appearance before 2007Best result before 2007
Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 2220032003Round 1
Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 4419952003Round 1
Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil 55199120033rd Place (1999)
Flag of Canada.svg  Canada 44199520034th Place (2003)
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR 5519912003Runners-up (1999)
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 4319911999Quarterfinals (1991 and 1995)
Flag of England.svg  England 2119951995Quarterfinals (1995)
Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 5519912003Champions (2003)
Flag of Ghana.svg  Ghana 3319992003Round 1
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 5519912003Quarterfinals (1995)
Flag of North Korea.svg  North Korea 3319992003Round 1
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 2119911991Round 1
Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 5519912003Quarterfinals (1999)
Flag of Norway.svg  Norway 5519912003Champions (1995)
Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden 5519912003Runners-up (2003)
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 5519912003Champions (1991 and 1999)

Every qualifier had participated in a previous Women's World Cup. To date, the 2007 Women's World Cup is the only World Cup for either men or women in which every team in the final tournament had played in a previous World Cup final tournament.

References and notes

  1. Gabon pulls out of hosting AWC, from BBC, retrieved 29 May 2006
  2. Australia To Host AFC Women's Championship 2006 Archived 1 September 2006 at the Wayback Machine ., from Football Federation Australia, retrieved 29 May 2006
  3. UEFA preliminaries, from FIFA.com, retrieved 30 June 2006
  4. Women's Gold Cup, from RSSSF, retrieved 29 May 2006
  5. Oceania's Women's Championship 2007 (Papua New Guinea), retrieved 22 March 2007
  6. Argentina called its women's national team with a view to Odesur, from Conmebol.com, retrieved 27 July 2006

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