ALUPEC

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The Alfabeto Unificado para a Escrita do Caboverdiano (Unified Alphabet for Cape Verdean Writing), commonly known as ALUPEC, is the alphabet that was officially recognized [1] by the Cape Verdean government to write Cape Verdean Creole.

Contents

Description

The ALUPEC is a phonetic writing system based on the Latin script and states only which letters should be used to represent each sound. The system does not establish rules for spelling (orthography). For that reason, Cape Verdean creole writing is not standardized; the same word or the same sentence may appear written in different ways. Cape Verdeans write idiosyncratically — that is, each person writes in his or her own dialect, sociolect, and idiolect.

The descriptive texts concerning the ALUPEC [2] [3] claim that it is “a system composed by 23 letters and four digraphs”. What those texts do not specify is that the ALUPEC also includes the letter Y and the digraph RR.

Older documents, such as the 1994 [4] Proposed Criteria of the Unified Alphabet for the Cape Verdean Writing System, showed the following order:
A B S D E F G H I J DJ L LH M N NH N̈ O P K R T U V X TX Z

Later documents (after 1998) [5] show the following order:
A B D DJ E F G H I J K L LH M N NH N̈ O P R S T TX U V X Z

The ALUPEC comes close to a perfect phonetic system in that almost every letter represents only one sound and almost every sound is represented by only one letter. The vowels may have a graphic accent, but the system does not consider letters with accents as separate letters.

LetterIPADescription
a/a/
or /ɐ/
like a in Portuguese pá
or like a in (European) Portuguese para
á/a/like a in Portuguese pá
â/ɐ/like a in (European) Portuguese para
b/b/like b in English but
d/d/like d in Portuguese dedo
dj/dʒ/like j in English just
e/e/ *like e in Portuguese dedo,
never like i in Portuguese filho
* see notes on Barlavento usage
é/ɛ/like e in Portuguese ferro
ê/e/like e in Portuguese dedo
f/f/like f in English for
g/ɡ/always like g in English go,
never like s in English pleasure
h used only in the digraphs lh and nh
i/i/
or /j/
like i in Portuguese vi
or like y in English yes
í/i/like i in Portuguese vi
j/ʒ/like s in English measure
k/k/like c in Portuguese caco
l/l/like l in French elle
lh/ʎ/like lh in Portuguese filho
m/m/like m in English me
n/n/like n in Portuguese não
nh /ɲ/like nh in Portuguese ninho

(n with diaeresis)
/ŋ/like ng in English king
o/o/like o in Portuguese amor
never like u in Portuguese tu
ó/ɔ/like o in Portuguese porta
ô/o/like o in Portuguese amor
p/p/like p in Portuguese para
r/ɾ/
or /ʀ/
like r in Portuguese porta
or like r in Portuguese rato
rr/ʀ/like rr in Portuguese ferro
s/s/ *like s in Portuguese sim,
never like z in Portuguese zero
* see notes on Barlavento usage
t/t/like t in Portuguese tu
tx/tʃ/like ch in English chair
u/u/
or /w/
like u in Portuguese tu
or like w in English wet
ú/u/like u in Portuguese tu
v/v/like v in English vain
x/ʃ/like sh in English ship,
never like the Portuguese words sexo, próximo or exame
z/z/like z in Portuguese zero

Additional notes:

word with the phoneme /e/ indeedtranslation into EnglishWord with the phoneme elidedcomparison with the same word
in Sotavento Creoles
translation into English
bejon
/beˈʒõ/
big kissbejon
/bʒõ/
bujon
/buˈʒõ/
imaginary bird that
haunts children (Pt: abujão)
kemâ
/keˈmɐ/
to burnkemâ
/kmɐ/
kumâ
/kuˈmɐ/
that
(subordinating conjunction)
pelâ
/peˈlɐ/
to peelpelâ
/plɐ/
pilâ
/piˈlɐ/
to pound
petâ
/peˈtɐ/
to defy someone
with the chest
petâ
/ptɐ/
botâ
/boˈtɐ/
to throw
pezâ
/peˈzɐ/
to weighpezâ
/pzɐ/
pizâ
/piˈzɐ/
to step on
remâ
/ʀeˈmɐ/
to rowremâ
/ʀmɐ/
rumâ
/ʀuˈmɐ/
to put in place,
to arrange
se
/se/
his / herse
/s/
si
/si/
if

History

The ALUPEC emerged in 1994, from the alphabet proposed by the Colóquio Linguístico de Mindelo, in 1979.

On 20 July 1998, the ALUPEC was approved [5] [6] by the Conselho de Ministros de Cabo Verde, for a five-year trial period. According to the same council, the ALUPEC would “take into account the diversity of the Cape Verdean Language in all the islands, and only after that trial period its introduction in schools would be considered”.

In 2005, the ALUPEC was recognized [1] by the Cape Verdean government as a viable system for writing the Cape Verdean Creole, becoming the first (and, As of 2016) only alphabet to attain such status. Nevertheless, the same law allows the usage of alternative writing models, "as long they are presented in a systematized and scientific way".

In 2009, Decree-Law No. 8/2009 officially institutionalized the use of the ALUPEC. [7]

In spite of having been officially recognized by the Government, the usage of ALUPEC is neither official, neither mandatory.

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References

  1. 1 2 Resolução n.º 48/2005 (Boletim Oficial da República de Cabo Verde – 2005)
  2. O caboverdiano em 45 lições (Veiga, Manuel – 2002)
  3. Proposta de Bases do Alfabeto unificado para a Escrita do Cabo-verdiano (Grupo para a padronização do alfabeto; Praia: IIPC, 2006)
  4. Proposed Criteria of the Unified Alphabet for the Capeverdean writing system Archived 2007-09-21 at the Wayback Machine - funana.org
  5. 1 2 3 Decreto-Lei n.º 67/98 (Boletim Oficial da República de Cabo Verde – 1998)
  6. Decreto-Lei n.º 67/98 (published in the Boletim Oficial da República de Cabo Verde – 1998)
  7. Decreto-Lei n.º 8/2009 (published in the Boletim Oficial da República de Cabo Verde No. 11 of 16 March 2009, pages 74–76)