Alexander Malcolm (rugby union)

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Alexander Malcolm
Birth nameAlexander George Malcolm
Date of birth(1867-11-09)9 November 1867
Place of birth Glasgow, Scotland
Date of death18 March 1951(1951-03-18) (aged 83)
Place of death Powell River, British Columbia, Canada
University University of Glasgow
Rugby union career
Position(s) Forward
Amateur team(s)
YearsTeamApps(Points)
- Glasgow University ()
Provincial / State sides
YearsTeamApps(Points)
1887
1888
Glasgow District
West of Scotland District
()
National team(s)
YearsTeamApps(Points)
1888 Scotland 1 (0)

Alexander Malcolm (9 November 1867 – 18 March 1951) was a Scotland international rugby union player. [1] [2]

Contents

Rugby Union career

Amateur career

He played rugby union for Glasgow University. [3]

Provincial career

He was capped by Glasgow District in the inter-city match of 1887. [4]

He was capped by West of Scotland District in their match against East of Scotland District on 11 February 1888. [5]

International career

Malcolm played once for Scotland; in the 1888 Home Nations Championship match against Ireland on 10 March 1888. [6]

Ranching in Canada

He emigrated to Canada in late 1888 and became a farmer, [7] rather than pursuing a career in architecture. The Squakum Ranch, at the end of present day Malcolm Rd, was a commercial orchard on the banks of the Fraser River. Alex bought the property in the early 1890s. Apart from returns to Scotland, Lake Errock was his home for about 50 years. [8] Their longest visit away was about 1896–1906. [9]

Marriage and children

In 1891, he married Mary Alberta Ross, [10] who died in 1943. [11]

They had four sons and two daughters. [12] The sons were Colin Ross (1892–1945), [13] [14] Alexander George (1894–1947), [15] Gordon Ross (1896–1917), [16] and Ian. The daughters were Helen Ross (1896–1959) [17] and Mary Hunter (1906–?). [18]

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References

  1. "Alexander George Malcolm". ESPN scrum.
  2. "Death Certificate (Alexander George MALCOLM)". www.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca.
  3. Scotland. The Essential History of Rugby Union. Nick Oswald and John Griffiths. Headline Book Publishing. 2003
  4. "The Glasgow Herald - Google News Archive Search". news.google.com.
  5. https://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/viewer/bl/0000540/18880213/263/0004 via British Newspaper Archive.{{cite web}}: Missing or empty |title= (help)
  6. "Rugby Union - ESPN Scrum - Statsguru - Player analysis - Alexander Malcolm - Test matches". ESPN scrum.
  7. "Alexander George Malcolm (1867-1951) - Find A..." www.findagrave.com.
  8. Sleigh, Daphne (1983). Discovering Deroche: From Nicomen to Lake Errock. Self-published. p. 22.
  9. "Fraser Advance". library.ubc.ca. 23 February 1907. p. 8.
  10. "Marriage Certificate (MALCOLM/ROSS)". www.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca.
  11. "Death Certificate (Mary MALCOLM)". www.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca.
  12. "Daily Colonist". archive.org. 6 August 1943. p. 12.
  13. "Veteran Death (Colin Ross MALCOLM". canadiangreatwarproject.com.
  14. "Death Certificate (Colin Ross MALCOLM)". www.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca.
  15. "Death Certificate (Alexander George MALCOLM (jnr))". www.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca.
  16. "War Death (Gordon Ross MALCOLM". canadiangreatwarproject.com.
  17. "Death Certificate (Helen Ross HUGHES)". www.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca.
  18. "Marriage Certificate (Carey/MALCOLM)". www.royalbcmuseum.bc.ca.