American Association of School Administrators

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The American Association of School Administrators (AASA), founded in 1865, is the professional organization for more than 14,000 educational leaders across the United States. [1] AASA’s members are chief executive officers and senior-level administrators from school districts in every region of the country, in rural, urban, and suburban settings. AASA’s mission is to support and develop effective school system leaders who are dedicated to the highest quality public education for all children. [2]

Education Learning in which knowledge and skills is transferred through teaching

Education is the process of facilitating learning, or the acquisition of knowledge, skills, values, beliefs, and habits. Educational methods include storytelling, discussion, teaching, training, and directed research. Education frequently takes place under the guidance of educators and also learners may also educate themselves. Education can take place in formal or informal settings and any experience that has a formative effect on the way one thinks, feels, or acts may be considered educational. The methodology of teaching is called pedagogy.

United States federal republic in North America

The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States or America, is a country composed of 50 states, a federal district, five major self-governing territories, and various possessions. At 3.8 million square miles, the United States is the world's third or fourth largest country by total area and is slightly smaller than the entire continent of Europe's 3.9 million square miles. With a population of over 327 million people, the U.S. is the third most populous country. The capital is Washington, D.C., and the largest city by population is New York City. Forty-eight states and the capital's federal district are contiguous in North America between Canada and Mexico. The State of Alaska is in the northwest corner of North America, bordered by Canada to the east and across the Bering Strait from Russia to the west. The State of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific Ocean. The U.S. territories are scattered about the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea, stretching across nine official time zones. The extremely diverse geography, climate, and wildlife of the United States make it one of the world's 17 megadiverse countries.

Chief executive officer highest-ranking corporate officer or administrator

The chief executive officer (CEO), or just chief executive (CE), is the most senior corporate, executive, or administrative officer in charge of managing an organization – especially an independent legal entity such as a company or nonprofit institution. CEOs lead a range of organizations, including public and private corporations, non-profit organizations and even some government organizations. The CEO of a corporation or company typically reports to the board of directors and is charged with maximizing the value of the entity, which may include maximizing the share price, market share, revenues, or another element. In the non-profit and government sector, CEOs typically aim at achieving outcomes related to the organization's mission, such as reducing poverty, increasing literacy, etc.

Contents

Legislation

On April 1, 2014, the Success and Opportunity through Quality Charter Schools Act (H.R. 10; 113th Congress) was introduced into the United States House of Representatives, where it passed on May 7, 2014. [3] The bill would amend and reauthorize both the Charter School Programs and the Credit Enhancement for Charter School Initiatives under Title V of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 through fiscal year 2020 and combine them into a single authorization. [4] This is intended to streamline and improve the grants process and increase the funding for these programs from $250 million to $300 million. [5] The AASA opposed the bill, arguing that the bill did not have sufficient provisions in it to make sure tax dollars were being spent correctly, although they conceded the bill was an improvement over current law. [5]

United States House of Representatives lower house of the United States Congress

The United States House of Representatives is the lower chamber of the United States Congress, the Senate being the upper chamber. Together they comprise the legislature of the United States.

Authorization bill

An authorization bill is a type of legislation used in the United States to authorize the activities of the various agencies and programs that are part of the federal government of the United States. Authorizing such programs is one of the powers of the United States Congress. Authorizations give those things the legal power to operate and exist. Authorization bills must be passed in both the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate before being signed by the President of the United States in order to become law. They may originate in either chamber of Congress, unlike revenue raising bills, which must originate in the House. They can also be considered at any time during the year.

See also

American Federation of School Administrators

The American Federation of School Administrators (AFSA) represents public school principals, vice principals, administrators, and supervisors in the United States. The trade union belongs to the AFL–CIO as one of the organization's smallest members.

Notes

  1. Rowh, Mark (2001). Opportunities in educational support careers. Chicago, Ill: VGM Career Books. p. 101. ISBN   0-658-00049-7.
  2. Allen-Meares, Paula; Franklin, Cynthia; Harris, Mary Emma (2006). The school services sourcebook: a guide for school-based professionals. Oxford [Oxfordshire]: Oxford University Press. p. 1126. ISBN   0-19-517523-9.
  3. "H.R. 10 - All Actions". United States Congress. Retrieved 13 May 2014.
  4. "CBO - H.R. 10". Congressional Budget Office. Retrieved 8 May 2014.
  5. 1 2 Bidwell, Allie (9 May 2014). "House Steams Ahead on Charter School Expansion". U.S. News and World Report. Retrieved 13 May 2014.

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