Arch-Treasurer

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Arms of the office of Arch-Treasurer of the Empire, showing the imperial crown HRE Arch-Treasurer Arms.svg
Arms of the office of Arch-Treasurer of the Empire, showing the imperial crown

An Arch-Treasurer (German : Erzschatzmeister, Latin : Archithesaurarius) is a chief treasurer, specifically the great treasurer of the Holy Roman Empire.

German language West Germanic language

German is a West Germanic language that is mainly spoken in Central Europe. It is the most widely spoken and official or co-official language in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, South Tyrol (Italy), the German-speaking Community of Belgium, and Liechtenstein. It is also one of the three official languages of Luxembourg and a co-official language in the Opole Voivodeship in Poland. The languages which are most similar to German are the other members of the West Germanic language branch: Afrikaans, Dutch, English, the Frisian languages, Low German/Low Saxon, Luxembourgish, and Yiddish. There are also strong similarities in vocabulary with Danish, Norwegian and Swedish, although those belong to the North Germanic group. German is the second most widely spoken Germanic language, after English.

Treasurer person responsible for running the treasury of an organization

A treasurer is the person responsible for running the treasury of an organization. The adjective for a treasurer is normally "tresorial." The adjective "treasurial" normally means pertaining to a treasury, rather than the treasurer. The significant core functions of a corporate treasurer include cash and liquidity management, risk management, and corporate finance.

Holy Roman Empire varying complex of lands that existed from 962 to 1806 in Central Europe

The Holy Roman Empire was a multi-ethnic complex of territories in Western and Central Europe that developed during the Early Middle Ages and continued until its dissolution in 1806 during the Napoleonic Wars. The largest territory of the empire after 962 was the Kingdom of Germany, though it also came to include the neighboring Kingdom of Bohemia, the Kingdom of Burgundy, the Kingdom of Italy, and numerous other territories.

Contents

History

The office was created in 1648 for Frederick V, Elector Palatine, after he lost his electorate, and title of Imperial Arch-Steward, in February 1623 to Maximilian I, Elector of Bavaria. The electorate was given to Bavaria by the emperor Ferdinand II. The office of Arch-Treasurer passed to the Elector of Hanover in 1777.

Maximilian I, Elector of Bavaria Wittelsbach ruler of Bavaria and a prince-elector (Kurfürst) of the Holy Roman Empire

Maximilian I, occasionally called "the Great", a member of the House of Wittelsbach, ruled as Duke of Bavaria from 1597. His reign was marked by the Thirty Years' War during which he obtained the title of a Prince-elector of the Holy Roman Empire at the 1623 Diet of Regensburg.

Ferdinand II, Holy Roman Emperor Archduke of Austria, 1619 to 1637 Holy Roman Emperor, King of Hungary and Bohemia

Ferdinand II, a member of the House of Habsburg, was Holy Roman Emperor (1619–1637), King of Bohemia, and King of Hungary (1618–1637). He was the son of Archduke Charles II of Inner Austria, and Maria of Bavaria. In 1590, his parents, who were devout Catholics, sent him to study at the Jesuits' college in Ingolstadt, because they wanted to isolate him from the Lutheran nobles. In the same year, he inherited Inner Austria—Styria, Carinthia, Carniola and smaller provinces—from his father. Rudolph II, Holy Roman Emperor, who was the head of the Habsburg family, appointed regents to administer Inner Austria on behalf of the minor Ferdinand.

Significance

The title of Arch-Treasurer was only ceremonially significant, as it was only used in the coronation of Emperors. [1]

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References

  1. Whaley, Joachim (2011). Germany and the Holy Roman Empire. Oxford: Oxford University Press. p. 75. ISBN   9780199693078.