Arena polo

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Arena polo is a fast-paced version of polo played outdoors on an enclosed all-weather surface, or in an indoor arena. [1] [2] Hurlingham Polo Association (HPA, Great Britain) and US Polo Association (USPA, USA ) have established their own rules for arena polo, and these rules are often used in other countries as well.

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Unlike outdoor polo, which is played on a 10-acre field, arena polo is played on 300 feet by 150 feet field, enclosed by walls of four or more feet in height. The normal game consists of four chukkas, or periods, of seven and one-half minutes each. A polo ball is similar to a mini soccer ball, larger than the hard plastic ball used outdoors. The arena game is played on a dirt surface with the ball bouncing on the uneven surface and off the arena wall.

Arena polo is typically far more financially accessible than outdoor polo. Club membership fees are usually lesser in comparison, in large part because an arena does not have the high annual maintenance cost of a grass field. Player investment is often smaller because, at a minimum, only two horses are needed to play a regulation arena polo match. Rather than a dedicated truck and large trailer, a bumper-pull trailer and a SUV is usually sufficient for transporting the horses of the arena polo player.

Arena polo can be played year-round, which is attractive to many players because it makes progress in the sport easier and quicker. The most popular season for arena polo is winter.

Arena Polo Tournaments

The U.S. Arena Polo Championship

The U.S. Arena Polo Championship is a 12-18 goal tournament. It is one of the highest levels of fast version of polo competition currently played in the United States. Its history dates back to 1926, where the first tournament was held and won by the Yale University team of Reddington Barret, Winston Guest and William Mui.

Arena Polo Grand Prix

Held in Argentina and promoted by La Carona Polo Club along with the Argentine Polo Association, the Arena Polo Grand Prix was organized for the first time in June 2019, and it was the start for the Arena Polo in Argentina. It's the first and only official arena polo tournament organized in Argentina.

Arena Polo European Championship

The first tournament of this championship was held in 2015. Alongside the Equestrian Federation of Azerbaijan Republic (ARAF) the tournament was organized by the team of World Polo.

Six teams from Germany, Ireland, Switzerland, Italy, Spain and a local team from Azerbaijan competed against each other to win the title of the 1st FIP Arenas Polo European Championship.

See also

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References

  1. "Intercollegiate (College) Polo". Archived from the original on April 13, 2009. Retrieved 2009-09-03.
  2. "Arena Polo". Archived from the original on September 29, 2011. Retrieved 2010-01-06.