Association of Road Racing Statisticians

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The Association of Road Racing Statisticians is an independent, non-profit organization that collects, analyzes, and publishes statistics regarding road running races. The primary purpose of the ARRS is to maintain a valid list of world road records for standard race distances and to establish valid criteria for road record-keeping. [1] The official publication of the ARRS is the Analytical Distance Runner . [2] This newsletter contains recent race results and analysis and is distributed to subscribers via e-mail. The ARRS is the only organized group that maintains records on indoor marathons. [3]

Statistics Study of the collection, analysis, interpretation, and presentation of data

Statistics is the discipline that concerns the collection, organization, displaying, analysis, interpretation and presentation of data. In applying statistics to a scientific, industrial, or social problem, it is conventional to begin with a statistical population or a statistical model to be studied. Populations can be diverse groups of people or objects such as "all people living in a country" or "every atom composing a crystal". Statistics deals with every aspect of data, including the planning of data collection in terms of the design of surveys and experiments. See glossary of probability and statistics.

Road running distance running sport on roads

Road running is the sport of running on a measured course over an established road.

Contents

History

Ken Young (November 9, 1941 - February 3, 2018) of Petrolia, California was a retired professor of atmospheric physics and former American record-holder in the indoor marathon who currently holds two of the top 10 marks in the event. [3] [4] [5] Ted Haydon, a former track coach for the University of Chicago Track Club and the United States in the 1968 Olympic Games, reportedly staged an indoor marathon for Young so that he could make an attempt at a world record in the indoor marathon. [6] Young also earned a PhD in geophysical sciences with a minor in statistics, and taught at the University of Arizona. [4] Young was the founder and director of the National Running Data Center (NRDC), self-described as "an independent, non-profit organization devoted to the collection, analysis, publication and dissemination of long-distance running information." [7] This group pioneered and developed road racing records in the United States. [4]

Petrolia, California Unincorporated community in California, United States

Petrolia is an unincorporated community in Humboldt County, California, 10 miles (16 km) southeast of Cape Mendocino, at an elevation of 121 feet (37 m) above sea level, within ZIP Code 95558, and area code 707. Petrolia was the site of the first oil well drilled in California.

Atmospheric physics The application of physics to the study of the atmosphere

Atmospheric physics is the application of physics to the study of the atmosphere. Atmospheric physicists attempt to model Earth's atmosphere and the atmospheres of the other planets using fluid flow equations, chemical models, radiation budget, and energy transfer processes in the atmosphere. In order to model weather systems, atmospheric physicists employ elements of scattering theory, wave propagation models, cloud physics, statistical mechanics and spatial statistics which are highly mathematical and related to physics. It has close links to meteorology and climatology and also covers the design and construction of instruments for studying the atmosphere and the interpretation of the data they provide, including remote sensing instruments. At the dawn of the space age and the introduction of sounding rockets, aeronomy became a subdiscipline concerning the upper layers of the atmosphere, where dissociation and ionization are important.

Edward M. 'Ted' Haydon (1912–1985), was a University of Chicago track coach and founder of the University of Chicago Track Club. He was inducted into the USA Track & Field Hall of Fame and the U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association Hall of Fame. He was an assistant coach for the 1968 and 1972 Olympic Teams and for the 1963 and 1979 Pan American Games.

After the United States Congress passed the Amateur Sports Act of 1978, The Athletics Congress (TAC), now known as USA Track & Field, replaced the Amateur Athletic Union as the national governing body for the sport of athletics. [8] Although the records maintained by Young and the NRDC were initially "unofficial", The Athletics Congress recognized them as its official records at their annual meeting in late 1979. [7] In 1986, the official record-keeping for TAC would be assumed by TACStats, later known as the Road Information Center. [9]

United States Congress Legislature of the United States

The United States Congress is the bicameral legislature of the federal government of the United States, and consists of two chambers: the House of Representatives and the Senate. The Congress meets in the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C. Both senators and representatives are chosen through direct election, though vacancies in the Senate may be filled by a gubernatorial appointment. Congress has 535 voting members: 435 representatives and 100 senators. The House of Representatives has six non-voting members representing Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam, the Northern Mariana Islands, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the District of Columbia in addition to its 435 voting members. Although they cannot vote in the full house, these members can address the house, sit and vote in congressional committees, and introduce legislation.

Amateur Sports Act of 1978

The Amateur Sports Act of 1978, signed by President Jimmy Carter, established the United States Olympic Committee and provides for national governing bodies for each Olympic sport. The Act provides important legal protection for individual athletes.

Amateur Athletic Union US nonprofit athletic organization

The Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) is an amateur sports organization based in the United States. A multi-sport organization, the AAU is dedicated exclusively to the promotion and development of amateur sports and physical fitness programs. It has more than 700,000 members nationwide, including more than 100,000 volunteers.

Related Research Articles

Marathon world record progression Wikimedia list article

This list is a chronological progression of record times for the marathon. World records in the marathon are now ratified by the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF), the international governing body for the sport of athletics.

Gert Thys South African marathon runner

Gert Thys is a male long-distance runner from South Africa, who represented his native country in the marathon at the 1996 and 2004 Summer Olympics. Thys is a former African record holder in the marathon, and is the current holder of the South African record with his best of 2:06:33 from the 1999 Tokyo International Marathon, which was also the course record for that race.

The men's marathon event was part of the track and field athletics programme at the 1920 Summer Olympics. The distance of this race was 42.75 kilometres. The competition was held on Sunday, 22 August 1920.

Rolando Patricio Vera Rodas is a retired long-distance runner from Ecuador, who represented his native country at three consecutive Summer Olympics, starting in 1988. He reached the top ten of the 10,000 metres at the 1987 World Championships in Athletics. He enjoyed much championship success at the regional level: he was a two-time South American Champion on the track and won gold medals at the South American Games and Bolivarian Games, as well as reaching the podium at the Ibero-American Championships and the 1987 Pan American Games.

Lineth Chepkurui is a Kenyan long distance runner.

Sammy Kitwara Kenyan long-distance runner

Sammy Kirop Kitwara is a Kenyan long-distance runner who specialises in road running events. He is coached by Moses Kiptanui.

Ernst van Aaken German sports physician and athletics trainer

Ernst van Aaken was a German sports physician and athletics trainer. Van Aaken became known as the "Running Doctor" and was the founder of the training method called the Waldnieler Dauerlauf. He is generally recognized as the founder of the long slow distance method of endurance training.

Albert Richard "Whitey" Michelsen was an American long-distance runner who is recognized as having set a world's best in the marathon on October 12, 1925, with a time of 2:29:01 at the inaugural Port Chester Marathon in Port Chester, New York. According to the International Association of Athletics Federations, Michelsen held this record until Fusashige Suzuki posted a 2:27:49 performance in Tokyo, Japan on March 31, 1935.

Thure Johansson (1886–1970) was a Swedish long-distance runner who is credited by the International Association of Athletics Federations for setting a world's best of 2:40:34 in the marathon on August 31, 1909. Johansson's record was reportedly set on a 368-meter indoor track at the Idrottsparken Velodrome Marathon in Stockholm, Sweden.

Paavo Edvard Kotila was a Finnish long-distance runner, Olympian, and three-time national champion in the marathon.

Violet Stewart Louisa Piercy was an English long-distance runner who is recognized by the International Association of Athletics Federations as having set the first women's world best in the marathon on 3 October 1926 with a time of 3:40:22. Piercy was reported to have run unofficially and her mark was set on the Polytechnic Marathon course between Windsor and London.

Maureen "Moe" Wilton is a former Canadian long-distance runner who is well recognized by the International Association of Athletics Federations as having set a world best in the marathon on May 6, 1967 with a time of 3:15:23 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Wilton, who started running when she was nine years old, was 13 when she set the mark; it was her first marathon and run on an unpaved Eastern Canadian Marathon Championships course. Her time broke the previous record, set in 1964, by more than four minutes.

Anni Pede-Erdkamp is a former West German long-distance runner who is recognized by the International Association of Athletics Federations as having set a world best in the marathon on September 16, 1967 with a time of 3:07:27 in Waldniel, West Germany.

Chantal Langlacé is a French long-distance runner who is recognized by the International Association of Athletics Federations as having set a world best in the marathon on two different occasions. Langlacé set a world best mark on 27 October 1974 with a 2:46:24 performance in Neuf-Brisach, France, then recaptured it from American Jacqueline Hansen on 1 May 1977 with 2:35:16 in Oiartzun, Spain.

Jacqueline Hansen is a former long-distance runner from the United States who is recognized by the International Association of Athletics Federations as having set a world best in the marathon on two different occasions.

Patti Catalano Dillon is a former long-distance runner from the United States who is recognized by the International Association of Athletics Federations as having set world bests in the half marathon, 30 kilometers, and 20 kilometers.

Half marathon world record progression

The world record in the half marathon has been officially recognised since 1 January 2004 by the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF), the international governing body for the sport of athletics. A total of five men's world records and six women's world records have been officially ratified since that date. The IAAF officially recognised the fastest times prior to that date as a "world best" from 1 January 2003 onwards. Before that date, the IAAF did not recognise any road running world records, though the concept of a world record was recognised by other organisations, such as the Association of Road Racing Statisticians (ARRS).

10-mile run distance in atletics

The 10-mile run is a long-distance road running event over a distance of ten miles (16.1 kilometres). Also referred to as a 10-miler or 10 miles run, it is a relatively common distance in countries that use the mile as a unit of reference. It is roughly an intermediate distance between the 10K run and the half marathon (21.1 km). The level of endurance required to run the distance means it attracts more seasoned runners than shorter events do and usually requires a period of preparation for first-time attempts.

References

  1. "Ranking Lists". Athletics.org.nz. 2010-06-25. Archived from the original on 7 July 2009. Retrieved 2010-07-26.
  2. "Running Times Magazine: Mo Trafeh's Outstanding Spring Racing Season Nets Him an Agent". Runningtimes.com. Retrieved 2010-07-26.
  3. 1 2 Tom, Held (January 23, 2009). "Indoor marathon follow-up: no record for you". Journal Sentinel . Milwaukee. Retrieved May 26, 2010.
  4. 1 2 3 "Ken Young". Association of Road Racing Statisticians. Retrieved May 26, 2010.
  5. "All-Time Performances- Marathon Indoor Track". Association of Road Racing Statisticians. Archived from the original on 9 July 2010. Retrieved May 26, 2010.
  6. David Diego Rodríguez, Ph.D. (May 1985). "Ted Haydon". Illinois Runner. Archived from the original on March 16, 2009. Retrieved May 26, 2010.
  7. 1 2 "National Running Data Center" (PDF). NRDC News. Tucson, Arizona: National Running Data Center. 1. February 15, 1980. Archived from the original (PDF) on July 15, 2011. Retrieved May 26, 2010.
  8. "Facts About Us". Quicksilver Track Club. Archived from the original on 2009-12-02. Retrieved 2010-07-26.
  9. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2009-01-30. Retrieved 2010-05-28.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)

See also