Athlone Pursuivant

Last updated

Athlone Pursuivant of Arms (or Athlone Pursuivant) was a junior officer of arms in Ireland, founded 1552 during the reign of Edward VI, King of England and King of Ireland, and was named for the town of Athlone, which is partly in Co. Roscommon (in the province of Connacht). The other heraldic offices of Ireland being Ireland King of Arms, 1392-1485, the Ulster King of Arms (Ulster) from 1552, the Dublin Herald (Leinster) and the Cork Herald (Munster). Accordingly, an officer was named for each of the four traditional provinces of Ireland. From 1943 the Ulster King of Arms was merged with the Norroy King of Arms as the Norroy and Ulster King of Arms with jurisdiction for Northern Ireland. Heraldic matters in the Republic of Ireland are now handled by the office of the Chief Herald of Ireland (a part of the Genealogical Office in the National Library).

Contents

The Order of St. Patrick was instituted by George III 5 Feb 1783 and the Athlone Persuivant became one of its officers thereafter, being 12th in order of precedence. There are no living members of the Order.

Literary Reference

James Joyce mentioned the office in 'Ulysses' and again in 'Finnegans Wake' as the "Athlone Poursuivant".

List of holders with recorded years in office

On the death of Burtchaell, Nevile Wilkinson suggested Thomas Sadleir to succeed the deceased. However, Sadleir declined to accept the offer. He operated the Office of Arms in the capacity of Deputy Ulster King of Arms. The post of Athlone Pursuivant had never been filled since then. [34]

See also

Notes

  1. Literary Remains of King Edward the Sixth, Vol II by John Gough Nichols, F.S.A. (London, 1857)|
  2. A History of the College of Arms: and the lives of all the Kings, Heralds and Pursuivants from the reign of Richard III|
  3. Patentee Officers in Ireland 1173-1826 James L. J. Hughes (Irish Manuscripts Commission, 1960)|
  4. Patentee Officers in Ireland 1173-1826 James L. J. Hughes (Irish Manuscripts Commission, 1960)|
  5. John Derricke's The Image of Ireland: with a Discoverie of Woodkarne, Manchester University (Manchester 2021) |
  6. Patentee Officers in Ireland 1173-1826 James L. J. Hughes (Irish Manuscripts Commission, 1960)|
  7. Patentee Officers in Ireland 1173-1826 James L. J. Hughes (Irish Manuscripts Commission, 1960)|
  8. Patentee Officers in Ireland 1173-1826 James L. J. Hughes (Irish Manuscripts Commission, 1960)|
  9. Funeral Entries, Volume 17, Ulster King of Arms, p.190-1.
  10. A Dictionary of Irish Artists (1913)|
  11. Patentee Officers in Ireland 1173-1826 James L. J. Hughes (Irish Manuscripts Commission, 1960)|
  12. Patentee Officers in Ireland 1173-1826 James L. J. Hughes (Irish Manuscripts Commission, 1960)|
  13. Patentee Officers in Ireland 1173-1826 James L. J. Hughes (Irish Manuscripts Commission, 1960)|
  14. The pedigrees and papers of James Terry, Athlone Herald, at the Court of James II in France (1690 - 1725) by Charles Edmund Lart (Exeter, 1938)
  15. Patentee Officers in Ireland 1173-1826 James L. J. Hughes (Irish Manuscripts Commission, 1960)|
  16. Patentee Officers in Ireland 1173-1826 James L. J. Hughes (Irish Manuscripts Commission, 1960)|
  17. The Antiquities and History of Ireland by Sir James Ware (Dublin, 1705)|
  18. Political Survey of Ireland by Sir William Petty (London, 1719)|
  19. Patentee Officers in Ireland 1173-1826 James L. J. Hughes (Irish Manuscripts Commission, 1960)|
  20. The Gentleman and Citizen's Almanack, by John Watson (Dublin 1740)|
  21. Patentee Officers in Ireland 1173-1826 James L. J. Hughes (Irish Manuscripts Commission, 1960)|
  22. Burke's Landed Gentry of Ireland (London, 1912 ed.)|
  23. Patentee Officers in Ireland 1173-1826 James L. J. Hughes (Irish Manuscripts Commission, 1960)|
  24. Patentee Officers in Ireland 1173-1826 James L. J. Hughes (Irish Manuscripts Commission, 1960)|
  25. Patentee Officers in Ireland 1173-1826 James L. J. Hughes (Irish Manuscripts Commission, 1960)|
  26. The Court Companion, containing the Arms of the Peers|
  27. The Extraordinary Red Book: containing a list of all the Places, Pensions, and Sinecures by A Commoner (London, 1817)|
  28. The Edinburgh Annual Register for 1821 printed for James Ballantyne and Co (Edinburgh, 1823)|
  29. The Royal Kalendar, and Court and City Register for England, Scotland, Ireland and the Colonies for the Year 1844 printed for Suttaby & Co (London, 1844)|
  30. "No. 11096". The Edinburgh Gazette . 26 May 1899. p. 531.
  31. Hood (2002), p.72.
  32. "No. 12115". The Edinburgh Gazette . 9 February 1909. p. 145.
  33. Dod's Peerage, Baronetage, Knightage, Etc. of Great Britain and Ireland for 1920 Vol I (London, 1920)|
  34. Hood (2002), pp.100-101.

Related Research Articles

Order of St Patrick Dormant British order of chivalry associated with Ireland

The Most Illustrious Order of Saint Patrick is a dormant British order of chivalry associated with Ireland. The Order was created in 1783 by George III at the request of the then Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, the 3rd Earl Temple. The regular creation of knights of the Order lasted until 1922, when most of Ireland gained independence as the Irish Free State, a dominion within what was then known as the British Commonwealth of Nations. While the Order technically still exists, no knight of St Patrick has been created since 1936, and the last surviving knight, Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester, died in 1974. Elizabeth II, however, remains the Sovereign of the Order, and one officer, the Ulster King of Arms, also survives. St Patrick is patron of the order; its motto is Quis separabit?, Latin for "Who will separate [us]?": an allusion to the Vulgate translation of Romans 8:35, "Who shall separate us from the love of Christ?"

Officer of arms State officer for heraldic, armorial or ceremonial duties

An officer of arms is a person appointed by a sovereign or state with authority to perform one or more of the following functions:

Pursuivant Junior officer of arms

A pursuivant or, more correctly, pursuivant of arms, is a junior officer of arms. Most pursuivants are attached to official heraldic authorities, such as the College of Arms in London or the Court of the Lord Lyon in Edinburgh. In the mediaeval era, many great nobles employed their own officers of arms. Today, there still exist some private pursuivants that are not employed by a government authority. In Scotland, for example, several pursuivants of arms have been appointed by Clan Chiefs. These pursuivants of arms look after matters of heraldic and genealogical importance for clan members.

Coat of arms of Ireland National coat of arms of the Republic of Ireland

The coat of arms of Ireland is blazoned as Azure a harp Or, stringed Argent. These arms have long been Ireland's heraldic emblem. References to them as being the arms of the king of Ireland can be found as early as the 13th century. These arms were adopted by Henry VIII of England when he ended the period of Lordship of Ireland and declared Ireland to be a kingdom again in 1541. When the crowns of England, Scotland and Ireland were united in 1603, they were integrated into the unified royal coat of arms of kingdoms of England, Scotland and Ireland. The harp was adopted as the emblem of the Irish Free State when it separated from the United Kingdom in 1922. They were registered as the arms of Ireland with the Chief Herald of Ireland on 9 November 1945.

Nevile Wilkinson

Major Sir Nevile Rodwell Wilkinson, KCVO, was a British officer of arms, British Army officer, author and a dollhouse designer.

Private officer of arms

A private officer of arms is one of the heralds and pursuivants appointed by great noble houses to handle all heraldic and genealogical questions.

John Brooke-Little British heraldic writer (1927–2006); Clarenceux King of Arms

John Philip Brook Brooke-Little was an English writer on heraldic subjects, and a long-serving herald at the College of Arms in London. In 1947, while still a student, Brooke-Little founded the Society of Heraldic Antiquaries, now known as the Heraldry Society and recognised as one of the leading learned societies in its field. He served as the society's chairman for 50 years and then as its President from 1997 until his death in 2006.

Algar Howard

Major General Sir Algar Henry Stafford Howard was a retired senior British Army officer and long-serving officer of arms at the College of Arms in London. He served as the Garter Principal King of Arms from 1944 to 1950 before retiring. He was the third consecutive Fitzalan Pursuivant of Arms Extraordinary to attain the highest rank at the College of Arms.

Aubrey John Toppin was a long-serving English officer of arms at the College of Arms in London.

Thomas Ulick Sadleir was an Irish genealogist and heraldic expert. He was successively registrar of the Order of St Patrick, Deputy Ulster King of Arms and Acting Ulster King of Arms.

Arthur Vicars

Sir Arthur Edward Vicars, KCVO, was a genealogist and heraldic expert. He was appointed Ulster King of Arms in 1893, but was removed from the post in 1908 following the theft of the Irish Crown Jewels in the previous year. He was killed by the IRA in 1921 during the Irish War of Independence.

Heraldic visitation

Heraldic visitations were tours of inspection undertaken by Kings of Arms throughout England, Wales and Ireland. Their purpose was to register and regulate the coats of arms of nobility, gentry and boroughs, and to record pedigrees. They took place from 1530 to 1688, and their records provide important source material for historians and genealogists.

Ireland King of Arms was the title of an officer of arms to the King of England and Lord of Ireland from 1392 until the accession of Henry VII as King of England in 1485. A king of arms is the highest of the three levels of officers of arms, and usually enjoys heraldic jurisdiction over a geographical area. Despite the name Ireland King of Arms did not appear to exercise heraldic authority in Ireland, and indeed the connection with Ireland seems rather tenuous. The office may have been created preparatory to a subsequently aborted military expedition to Ireland. The last holder of the office, Walter Bellinger, did exercise the heraldic prerogative of a king of arms to grant armorial bearings, however two of his grants were annulled or regranted by other kings of arms as they felt he encroached on their provinces. In 1552, 70 years after the last Ireland King of Arms, the office of Ulster King of Arms was created. The holders of this office exercised control over the heraldic affairs of Ireland until the death of its last incumbent, Major Sir Neville Wilkinson, in 1941. Thereafter, heraldic affairs within what later became the Republic of Ireland were transferred to the Government of Ireland while the jurisdiction of Norroy King of Arms expanded to include Northern Ireland when the present office of Norroy and Ulster King of Arms was established in the College of Arms.

James Terry (officer of arms)

James Terry was an Irish officer of arms who remained faithful to the Jacobite kings of Britain after their escape to the European continent.

Thomas Hawley

Thomas Hawley was a long-serving officer of arms at the College of Arms in London. He began his career of royal service as a groom porter to Queen Margaret of Scotland from her marriage in 1503 until 1508. Although he may have been made Rose Blanche Pursuivant in the reign of King Henry VII, his first permanent heraldic appointment came in 1509.

Sir Gerald Aylmer was an Irish judge in the time of Henry VIII and played a key part in enforcing the Dissolution of the Monasteries. His numerous descendants included the Barons Aylmer.

Irish genealogy is the study of individuals and/or families who originated on the island of Ireland.

OHiggins family Irish noble family

O'Higgins is an Irish noble family. Its Ballynary line is descended from Shean Duff O'Higgins, Gaelic Baron of Ballynary, who was married to a daughter of the royal family of O'Conor at Ballintuber Castle in Connacht. Shean Duff O'Higgins himself claimed descent from King Niall of Tara. Historically, many of their ancestors were poets and scholars who enjoyed the patronage of several chiefly families including O'Conor Don, MacDermott, O'Doherty, O'Gara, and MacDonagh.

Events from the year 1552 in Ireland.

George Dames Burtchaell

George Dames Burtchaell, KC; MA, LLB; MRIA; JP was an Irish genealogist.

References