Australian Film Institute

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Australian Film Institute
AbbreviationAFI
FormationNovember 1958
TypeFilm and television organisation
Headquarters Melbourne, Victoria
Location
  • 236 Dorcas Street, South Melbourne, Victoria 3205
Region served
Australia
CEO
Damian Trewhella
Website www.afi.org.au

The Australian Film Institute (AFI) was founded in 1958 as a non-profit organisation devoted to developing an active film culture in Australia and fostering engagement between the general public and the Australian film industry. It is responsible for producing Australia's premier annual film and television awards, as of 2011 known as AACTA Awards (previously the AFI Awards). [1]

Contents

The work of the institute is supported by government funding, corporate sponsors and approximately 10,000 members nationally. As Australia's foremost motion picture industry association, AFI promotes the Australian film and television industry and plays a central role in the way in which the Australian film industry is known and understood, both locally and internationally. [1]

In the 1970s, the AFI played a prominent part in reviving the Australian film industry and in convincing the government to invest in the creation of the Experimental Film Fund, a film school, and a corporation for advancing feature film production. The year 1976 marked the first time that the AFI Awards, which had been given since 1958, were televised. Ten years later, television categories were added to the awards.

A recent focus of the organisation has been on helping to develop the careers of Australian film artists, through the AFI Fellowship and AFI Documentary Trailbrazer programs, as well as with the AFI Young Film Actor Award. [1]

The AFI is affiliated with the Los Angeles Australian Film & Television Association. In August 2011, AFI formed a subsidiary professional organisation, the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts. [2]

AFI Research Collection

The AFI Research Collection Archived 2 March 2021 at the Wayback Machine is a significant non-lending, specialist film and television industry resource. The collection operates under the auspices of Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology's School of Media and Communication in conjunction with the Australian Film Institute. The Collection has particular strengths in screen history and theory and in Australian cinema, and features a diverse range of books, journals, film scripts, film directories, reports and film festival catalogues. [3]

See also

Related Research Articles

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The AACTA Award for Best Direction is an award presented by the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA), a non-profit organisation whose aim is to "identify, award, promote and celebrate Australia's greatest achievements in film and television." The award is presented at the annual AACTA Awards, which hand out accolades for achievements in feature film, television, documentaries and short films.

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National Film and Sound Archive

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The AACTA Award for Best Production Design is an award presented by the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA), a non-profit organisation whose aim is to "identify, award, promote and celebrate Australia's greatest achievements in film and television." The award is presented at the annual AACTA Awards, which hand out accolades for achievements in feature film, television, documentaries and short films. From 1976 to 2010, the category was presented by the Australian Film Institute (AFI), the Academy's parent organisation, at the annual Australian Film Institute Awards. When the AFI launched the Academy in 2011, it changed the annual ceremony to the AACTA Awards, with the current award being a continuum of the AFI Award for Best Production Design.

The AACTA Award for Best Costume Design is an accolade given by the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA), a non-profit organisation whose aim is to "identify, award, promote and celebrate Australia's greatest achievements in film and television." The award is handed out at the annual AACTA Awards, which rewards achievements in feature film, television, documentaries and short films. From 1977 to 2010, the category was presented by the Australian Film Institute (AFI), the Academy's parent organisation, at the annual Australian Film Institute Awards. When the AFI launched the Academy in 2011, it changed the annual ceremony to the AACTA Awards, with the current prize being a continuum of the AFI Award for Best Costume Design. Terry Ryan has received the most awards in this category with five.

The AACTA Award for Best Television Comedy Series is an accolade given by the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA), a non-profit organisation whose aim is to "identify, award, promote and celebrate Australia's greatest achievements in film and television." The award is handed out at the annual AACTA Awards, which rewards achievements in Australian feature film, television, documentaries and short films. From 2003 to 2010, the category was presented by the Australian Film Institute (AFI), the Academy's parent organisation, at the annual Australian Film Institute Awards. When the AFI launched the Academy in 2011, it changed the annual ceremony to the AACTA Awards, with the current prize being a continuum of the AFI Award for Best Television Comedy Series.

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Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts

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The AACTA Award for Best Documentary Under One Hour, is a non-feature film award presented by the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA) to the producer of an Australian documentary that is "a self-contained non-fiction film or Television Program equal to or less than 60 minutes in duration that is a creative treatment of actuality other than a news, current affairs, sports coverage, magazine, infotainment or light entertainment program." Prior to the establishment of the Academy in 2011, the award was presented by the Australian Film Institute (AFI) at the annual Australian Film Institute Awards from 2009–2010. A single award for Best Documentary was handed out from 1958–2008, before it was split into three categories: Best Feature Length Documentary, Best Documentary Under One Hour and Best Documentary Series. The award is presented at the AACTA Awards Luncheon, a black tie event which celebrates achievements in film production, television, documentaries and short films.

The AACTA Award for Best Documentary Series, is a non-feature film award presented by the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA) to the producer of an Australian documentary series that is "a Television Program consisting of a potentially unlimited number of episodes but not less than 2 that is a creative treatment of actuality other than a news, current affairs, sports coverage, magazine, infotainment or light entertainment program." Prior to the establishment of the Academy in 2011, the award was presented by the Australian Film Institute (AFI) at the annual Australian Film Institute Awards from 2009–2010. A single award for Best Documentary was handed out from 1958–2008, before it was split into three categories: Best Feature Length Documentary, Best Documentary Under One Hour and Best Documentary Series. The award is presented at the AACTA Awards Luncheon, a black tie event which celebrates achievements in film production, television, documentaries and short films.

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The AACTA Award for Best International Film is an award presented by the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA), a non-profit organisation whose aim is to "identify, award, promote, and celebrate Australia's greatest achievements in film and television". The award is presented at the annual AACTA International Awards, which hand out accolades for achievements in feature films, regardless of where the film was made. From 1992 to 2004, a similar award was presented by the Australian Film Institute (AFI), the Academy's parent organisation. It was known as the AFI Award for Best Foreign Film, and was handed out at the annual Australian Film Institute Awards.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "The Australian Film Institute – Celebrating 50 Years of Pride and Passion" Archived 21 May 2009 at the Wayback Machine
  2. "AFI is recast with new academy taking a bow". Sydney Morning Herald. 19 August 2011.
  3. "AFI Research Collection" Archived 12 November 2009 at the Wayback Machine