AACTA Award for Best Cinematography

Last updated

AACTA Award for Best Cinematography
CountryAustralia
Presented by Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA)
First awarded1976
Currently held by Simon Duggan, Hacksaw Ridge (2016)
Website http://www.aacta.org

The AACTA Award for Best Cinematography is an award presented by the Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA), a non-profit organisation whose aim is to "identify, award, promote and celebrate Australia's greatest achievements in film and television." [1] The award is presented at the annual AACTA Awards, which hand out accolades for achievements in feature film, television, documentaries and short films. [2] From 1976 to 2010, the category was presented by the Australian Film Institute (AFI), the Academy's parent organisation, at the annual Australian Film Institute Awards (known as the AFI Awards). [3] When the AFI launched the Academy in 2011, it changed the annual ceremony to the AACTA Awards, with the current award being a continuum of the AFI Award for Best Cinematography. [3]

Contents

Best Cinematography was first presented in 1976 Australian Film Institute Awards with the winner being chosen by the Australian Cinematographers Society (ACS). The award is presented to the cinematographer of a film that is Australian-made, or with a significant amount of Australian content. Russell Boyd, Peter James, Donald McAlpine and Geoffrey Simpson have won the award three times each, more than any other cinematographer. Boyd has received the most nominations with nine.

Winners and nominees

In the following table, the years listed correspond to the year of film release; the ceremonies are usually held the same year. [A] The cinematographer in yellow background have won the award. Those that are neither highlighted nor in bold are the nominees. When sorted chronologically, the table always lists the winning cinematographer first and then the other nominees. [4] [5]

Contents
AFI Awards (1976-2010)
AACTA Awards (2011-present)
1970s   1980s   1990s   2000s   2010s
  Winner
YearCinematographer(s)Film
AFI Awards
1970s
1976
(18th)
Ian Baker The Devil's Playground
Russell Boyd Picnic at Hanging Rock
Brian Gracey and Paul Cox Illuminations
David Gribble Polly Me Love
1977
(19th)
Russell Boyd Break of Day
Russell Boyd Summer of Secrets
Geoff Burton Storm Boy
Vincent Monton Raw Deal
1978
(20th)
Russell Boyd The Last Wave
Ian Baker The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith
Vincent Monton Newsfront
Brian Probyn The Mango Tree
1979
(21st)
Donald McAlpine My Brilliant Career
Michael Edols In Search of Anna
David Eggby Mad Max
Vincent Monton Snapshot
1980s
1980
(22nd)
Donald McAlpine Breaker Morant
Gary Hansen Manganinnie
Geoff Burton Stir
Russell Boyd The Chain Reaction
1981
(23rd)
Russell Boyd Gallipoli
Donald McAlpine Wu Ting
Vincent Monton Roadgames
John Seale The Survivor
1982
(24th)
Gary Hansen We of the Never Never
David Gribble Monkey Grip
Dean Semler Mad Max 2
Keith Wagstaff The Man from Snowy River
1983
(25th)
John Seale Careful, He Might Hear You
Russell Boyd The Year of Living Dangerously
Dean Semler Undercover
Yuri Sokol Man of Flowers
1984
(26th)
Dean Semler Razorback
John Seale Strikebound
Andrew de Groot Silver City
Yuri Sokol My First Wife
1985
(27th)
Peter James Rebel
Ray Argall Wrong World
Paul Murphy Bliss
Dean Semler The Coca-Cola Kid
1986
(28th)
Peter James The Right-Hand Man
Russell Boyd Burke & Wills
Jeff Darling Young Einstein
Donald McAlpine The Fringe Dwellers
1987
(29th)
Steve Dobson Ground Zero
James Bartle The Umbrella Woman
Malcolm McCulloch Belinda
Yuri Sokol Warm Nights on a Slow Moving Train
1988
(30th)
Geoffrey Simpson The Navigator: A Medieval Odyssey
David Connell Boulevard of Broken Dreams
Ellery Ryan Grievous Bodily Harm
Dean Semler The Lighthorsemen
1989
(31st)
Dean Semler Dead Calm
Sally Bongers Sweetie
Paul Murphy Emerald City
Ben Lewin Georgia
1990s
1990
(32nd)
Jeff Darling The Crossing
Russell Boyd Blood Oath
Geoff Burton Flirting
Nino Gaetano Martinetti Golden Braid
1991
(33rd)
Ellery Ryan Spotswood
Geoff Burton Aya
Denis Lenoir Dingo
Ellery Ryan Death in Brunswick
1992
(34th)
Peter James Black Robe
James Bartle Hammers Over the Anvil
Steve Mason Strictly Ballroom
Geoffrey Simpson The Last Days of Chez Nous
1993
(35th)
Stuart Dryburgh The Piano
Steve Mason Broken Highway
Vic Sarin On My Own
Eduardo Serra Map of the Human Heart
Stephen F. Windon No Worries
1994
(36th)
Nino Gaetano Martinetti Exile
Brian J. Breheny The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert
Ian Jones Bad Boy Bubby
Stephen F. Windon Country Life
1995
(37th)
Ellery Ryan Angel Baby
Tony Clarke Epsilon
Louis Irving Mushrooms
Ellery Ryan That Eye, the Sky
1996
(38th)
Geoffrey Simpson Shine
Dion Beebe What I Have Written
Martin McGrath Children of the Revolution
David Parker Mr. Reliable
1997
(39th)
Andrew Lesnie Doing Time for Patsy Cline
Malcolm McCulloch Kiss or Kill
Martin McGrath Blackrock
Mandy Walker The Well
1998
(40th)
Geoffrey Simpson Oscar and Lucinda
Simon Duggan The Interview
Tristan Milani The Boys
Martin McGrath In the Winter Dark
1999
(41st)
Martin McGrath Passion
Dion Beebe Praise
Malcolm McCulloch Two Hands
Danny Ruhlmann In a Savage Land
2000s
2000
(42nd)
Steve Mason Bootmen
John Brock 15 Amore
Geoffrey Hall and Kevin Hayward Chopper
Toby Oliver Looking for Alibrandi
2001
(43rd)
Donald McAlpine Moulin Rouge!
Steve Arnold La Spagnola
Tristan Milani The Bank
Brad Shield Yolngu Boy
2002
(44th)
Allan Collins Beneath Clouds
Christopher Doyle Rabbit-Proof Fence
Geoffrey Hall Dirty Deeds
Ian Jones The Tracker
2003
(45th)
Ian Baker Japanese Story
Tristan Milani Travelling Light
Garry Phillips Gettin' Square
Oliver Stapleton Ned Kelly
2004
(46th)
Robert Humphreys Somersault
Andrew Lesnie Love's Brother
Toby Oliver Tom White
Gary Ravenscroft One Perfect Day
2005
(47th)
Benoît Delhomme The Proposition
Alun Bollinger Oyster Farmer
Will Gibson Wolf Creek
Danny Ruhlmann Little Fish
2006
(48th)
Ian Jones Ten Canoes
Will Gibson Macbeth
Robert Humphreys Suburban Mayhem
David Williamson Jindabyne
2007
(49th)
Nigel Bluck The Home Song Stories
Laszlo Baranyai Noise
Geoffrey Simpson Romulus, My Father
Mark Wareham Clubland
2008
(50th)
Robert Humphreys Unfinished Sky
Denson Baker The Black Balloon
Geoffrey Simpson The Tender Hook
Haris Zambarloukos Death Defying Acts
2009
(51st)
Warwick Thornton Samson and Delilah
Andrew Commis Beautiful Kate
Greig Fraser Last Ride
Tristan Milani Balibo
2010s
2010
(52nd)
Greig Fraser Bright Star
Adam Arkapaw Animal Kingdom
Denson Baker The Waiting City
Toby Oliver Beneath Hill 60
AACTA Awards
2011
(1st)
Robert Humphreys The Hunter
Adam Arkapaw Snowtown
Geoffrey Hall Red Dog
Geoffrey Simpson Sleeping Beauty
2012
(2nd)
Warwick Thornton The Sapphires
Adam Arkapaw Lore
Jules O'Loughlin Wish You Were Here
Garry Phillips Burning Man
2013
(3rd)
Simon Duggan The Great Gatsby
Andrew Commis The Rocket
Geoffrey Hall, Rick Rifici and Rick Jakovich Drift
Damian E. Wyvill Goddess
2014
(4th)
Ben Nott Predestination
Marden DeanFell
Gary Phillips The Railway Man
Mandy Walker Tracks
2015
(5th)
John Seale Mad Max: Fury Road
Donald M. McAlpine The Dressmaker
Steve Arnold Last Cab to Darwin
Damian Wyvill Oddball
2016
(6th)
Simon Duggan Hacksaw Ridge
Andrew Commis Girl Asleep
Bonnie Elliott Spear
Bentley Dean Tanna
2017
(7th)
Greig Fraser Lion
Stefan Duscio Jungle
Geoffrey Hall Red Dog: True Blue
Michael McDermott Hounds of Love
2018
(8th)
Warwick Thornton Sweet Country
Marden Dean, Rick Rifici Breath
Peter James Ladies in Black
Thom NealWest of Sunshine
2019
(9th)
Adam Arkapaw The King
Ben Nott Danger Close: The Battle of Long Tan
Nick Remy Matthews Hotel Mumbai
Radek Ladczuk The Nightingale

Further reading

Notes

A ^ : From 1958-2010, the awards were held during the year of the films release. However, the first AACTA Awards were held in 2012 for films released in 2011. [6] [7]

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References

  1. "AACTA – The Academy". Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA). Archived from the original on 24 June 2012. Retrieved 3 June 2012.
  2. "AACTA – The Academy – The Awards". Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA). Retrieved 3 June 2012.
  3. 1 2 "AACTA – The Academy – Background". Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA). Retrieved 3 June 2012.[ permanent dead link ]
  4. "AFI/AACTA - Winners & Nominees". Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA). Retrieved 4 June 2012. Note: User must select years listed on page to view winners of that decade/year.
  5. Additional winners and nominees references:
    • French, Lisa; Poole, Mark (2009). Shining a Light: 50 Years of the Australian Film Institute. Australian Teachers of Media. p. 165. ISBN   1-876467-20-7.
    • French, Lisa; Poole, Mark (2009). Shining a Light: 50 Years of the Australian Film Institute. Australian Teachers of Media. p. 166. ISBN   1-876467-20-7.
    • French, Lisa; Poole, Mark (2009). Shining a Light: 50 Years of the Australian Film Institute. Australian Teachers of Media. p. 167. ISBN   1-876467-20-7.
    • French, Lisa; Poole, Mark (2009). Shining a Light: 50 Years of the Australian Film Institute. Australian Teachers of Media. p. 168. ISBN   1-876467-20-7.
  6. "AACTA - Past Winners - 1970-1979 - 1974-1975". Australian Academy of Cinema and Television Arts (AACTA). Retrieved 3 June 2012.
  7. Bodey, Michael (8 November 2011). "Industry academy announces new awards". The Australian . News Limited (News Corporation). Retrieved 5 June 2012.