Barry Gifford

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Barry Gifford
Barry Gifford.jpg
Gifford in 2006
Born (1946-10-18) October 18, 1946 (age 72)
Chicago, Illinois, United States
OccupationAuthor
NationalityAmerican

Barry Gifford (born October 18, 1946) [1] is an American author, poet, and screenwriter known for his distinctive mix of American landscapes and prose influenced by film noir and Beat Generation writers.

An author is the creator or originator of any written work such as a book or play, and is also considered a writer. More broadly defined, an author is "the person who originated or gave existence to anything" and whose authorship determines responsibility for what was created.

Poet Person who writes and publishes poetry

A poet is a person who creates poetry. Poets may describe themselves as such or be described as such by others. A poet may simply be a writer of poetry, or may perform their art to an audience.

Screenwriter Writer who writes for TV, films, comics and games

A screenplay writer, scriptwriter or scenarist is a writer who practices the craft of screenwriting, writing screenplays on which mass media, such as films, television programs and video games, are based.

Contents

Gifford is best known for his series of novels about Sailor and Lula, two star-crossed protagonists on a perpetual road trip. Published in seven novels between 1990 and 2015, the Sailor and Lula series is described by professor Andrei Codrescu as written in "a great comic realist" style that explores "an unmistakably American universe [...] populated by a huge and lovable humanity propelled on a tragic river of excess energy." [2] The first book of the series, Wild at Heart , was adapted by director David Lynch for the 1990 film of the same title. Gifford went on to write the original screenplay for Lost Highway (1997) with Lynch. Perdita Durango, the third book in the Sailor and Lula series, was adapted into a 1997 film by Alex de la Iglesia with a script co-written by Gifford.

A road trip, sometimes spelled roadtrip, is a long distance journey on the road. Typically, road trips are long distances traveled by automobile.

Andrei Codrescu American writer

Andrei Codrescu is a Romanian-American poet, novelist, essayist, screenwriter, and commentator for National Public Radio. He was the Mac Curdy Distinguished Professor of English at Louisiana State University from 1984 until his retirement in 2009.

Realism (arts) Artistic style of representing subjects realistically

Realism, sometimes called naturalism, in the arts is generally the attempt to represent subject matter truthfully, without artificiality and avoiding artistic conventions, or implausible, exotic, and supernatural elements. Realism has been prevalent in the arts at many periods, and can be in large part a matter of technique and training, and the avoidance of stylization.

Gifford also writes non-fiction and poetry.

Life and career

Gifford was born in a Chicago hotel room in 1946. [1] His father was Jewish and his mother was of Irish Catholic background. [3] Gifford's father was in organized crime, and he spent his childhood largely in Chicago and New Orleans living in hotels. After college he joined the Air Force Reserves. After a short stint pursuing a possible career in baseball, [4] Gifford focused on writing, both as a journalist and a poet.

Gifford's fourth novel, Wild at Heart: The Story of Sailor and Lula , caught the eye of director David Lynch, who adapted it into the screenplay and movie Wild at Heart . The movie won the Palme d'Or, the highest honor, at the Cannes Film Festival in 1990. The success of this film boosted interest in Gifford's novels.

Wild at Heart: The Story of Sailor and Lula is a 1990 pulp, "neo-noir" novel by Barry Gifford which was adapted by director David Lynch for the Wild At Heart in 1990. The movie won the Palme d'Or, the highest honor, at the Cannes Film Festival in 1990. The success of this film boosted interest in Gifford's novels.

<i>Wild at Heart</i> (film) 1990 film by David Lynch

Wild at Heart is a 1990 American neo-noir black comedy-crime film written and directed by David Lynch and starring Nicolas Cage, Laura Dern, Diane Ladd, Willem Dafoe, Harry Dean Stanton, and Isabella Rossellini. It is based on Barry Gifford's 1989 novel of the same name. Both the book and the film revolve around Sailor Ripley (Cage) and Lula Pace Fortune (Dern), a young couple from Cape Fear, North Carolina, who go on the run from her domineering mother and the gangsters she hires to kill Sailor.

Palme dOr highest prize awarded at the Cannes Film Festival

The Palme d'Or is the highest prize awarded at the Cannes Film Festival. It was introduced in 1955 by the festival's organizing committee. Previously, from 1939 to 1954, the highest prize at the festival was the Grand Prix du Festival International du Film. In 1964, The Palme d'Or was replaced again by the Grand Prix, before being reintroduced in 1975.

Bibliography

Poetry

Wang Wei (Tang dynasty) Chinese poet, musician, painter, and statesman

Wang Wei was a Chinese poet, musician, painter, and politician during the Tang dynasty. He was one of the most famous men of arts and letters of his time. Many of his poems are preserved, and twenty-nine were included in the highly influential 18th-century anthology Three Hundred Tang Poems.

Essays and short stories

Non-fiction

Chicago Cubs Baseball team and Major League Baseball franchise in Chicago, Illinois, United States

The Chicago Cubs are an American professional baseball team based in Chicago, Illinois. The Cubs compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) Central division. The team plays its home games at Wrigley Field, located on the city's North Side. The Cubs are one of two major league teams in Chicago; the other, the Chicago White Sox, is a member of the American League (AL) Central division. The Cubs, first known as the White Stockings, were a founding member of the NL in 1876, becoming the Chicago Cubs in 1903.

Novels and novellas

Graphic novels

Other works

Filmography

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References

  1. 1 2 "Guide to the Barry Gifford Papers, ca. 1970 -1997 [at Stanford University]" (PDF). Online Archive of California (OAC). c. 1998. Retrieved June 7, 2010.
  2. Andrei Codrescu, forward to The Rooster Trapped in the Reptile Room: The Barry Gifford Reader; edited by Thomas A. McCarthy; NY: Seven Stories Press (2003), p xi
  3. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on December 2, 2010. Retrieved September 30, 2010.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  4. "Barry Gifford's Long Road With Sailor & Lula". chicagoist.com. Archived from the original on 7 August 2016. Retrieved 22 June 2016.