Battle of Montmuran

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Battle of Montmuran
Part of the Breton War of Succession
Date10 April 1354
Location
Montmuran (Les Iffs)
Result Blois Party Victory
Belligerents
Armoiries Bretagne - Arms of Brittany.svg House of Montfort Armoiries Bretagne - Arms of Brittany.svg House of Blois
Blason France moderne.svg Kingdom of France
Commanders and leaders
Blason Hugues Calverley (selon Gelre).svg Hugh Calveley Blason du Guesclin.svg Bertrand du Guesclin

Following the defeat of Mauron during the Hundred Years' War, the Bretons, led by Bertrand Du Guesclin, took their revenge at the Battle of Montmuran on April 10, 1354.

The battle

Along with many other Englishmen, the young Hugh Calveley served in Brittany, supporting Jean de Montfort's English-backed bid to become Duke of Brittany against the French-backed claimant, Charles de Blois, during the Breton War of Succession.

In 1354, Calveley was captain of the English-held fortress of Bécherel. He planned a raid on the castle of Montmuran on 10 April, to capture Arnoul d'Audrehem, Marshal of France, who was a guest of the lady of Tinteniac. Bertrand du Guesclin, in one of the early highlights of his career, anticipated the attack, posting archers as sentries. When the sentries raised the alarm at Calveley's approach, du Guesclin and d'Audrehem hurried to intercept. In the ensuing fight, Calveley was unhorsed by a knight named Enguerrand d'Hesdin, captured, and later ransomed.

See also

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