Siege of Hennebont (1342)

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Siege of Hennebont (1342)
Part of the Breton War of Succession
Siege d'Hennebont.jpg
Siege of Hennebont.
DateMay–June 1342
Location
Hennebont, Duchy of Bretagne

The siege of Hennebont of 1342 was an episode of the succession of the War of Bretagne. The forces of Charles of Blois kept Jeanne of Flandre in the city, while they waited for English reinforcements. The arrival of these reinforcements in June 1342 provoked the lifting of the siege.

History

Jeanne of Flandre took refuge in Hennebont and waited for the reinforcements of Amaury of Clisson and the English troops. The siege of the city was made by the supporters of Charles of Blois. Following a trick, she succeeded in getting out of the besieged city, and going to Auray to find the reinforcements. They returned to Hennebont five days later, still thanks to a trick.

The siege itself continued until the arrival of English reinforcements, who penetrated Blavet (present day Port-Louis) in June.

The siege was then lifted, and the besiegers took the road to Auray to give a hand to Charles of Blois, who then held a siege in Auray.

Coordinates: 47°48′00″N3°17′00″W / 47.8000°N 3.2833°W / 47.8000; -3.2833

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