Blind Man's Bluff (1936 film)

Last updated

Blind Man's Bluff
Directed by Albert Parker
Written byB. Scott-Elder (play)
William Foster (play)
Cecil Maiden
Starring Basil Sydney
Enid Stamp-Taylor
James Mason
Barbara Greene
Cinematography Stanley Grant
Edited by Cecil H. Williamson
Production
company
Distributed byFox Film Company
Release date
March 1936
Running time
72 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

Blind Man's Bluff is a 1936 British drama film directed by Albert Parker and starring Basil Sydney, Enid Stamp-Taylor and James Mason. The film was a quota quickie made at Wembley Studios by the Hollywood studio Fox's British subsidiary. [1]

Contents

Premise

A doctor invents a cure for blindness.

Cast

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Enid Stamp Taylor</span> British actress

Enid Georgiana Stamp Taylor was an English actress. Her childhood home was 17, Percy Avenue, in Whitley Bay, Northumberland, in what is now Tyne and Wear.

The Stickpin is a 1933 British crime film directed by Leslie S. Hiscott and starring Henry Kendall, Betty Astell and Francis L. Sullivan.

<i>The Riverside Murder</i> 1935 film

The Riverside Murder is a 1935 British crime film directed by Albert Parker and starring Basil Sydney, Judy Gunn and Zoe Davis. A woman reporter helps an inspector solve the deaths of four financiers on the eve of a group shareout. The film was shot at Wembley Studios in London with sets designed by the art director Ralph W. Brinton. A quota quickie, it was produced and distributed by Fox Film. It is based on the 1931 novel The Six Dead Men by Belgian author Stanislas-André Steeman, which was later adapted into the 1941 French film The Last of the Six. The film shifted the setting from France to London. It marked the film debut of Alastair Sim.

<i>The Third Clue</i> 1934 film

The Third Clue is a 1934 British crime film directed by Albert Parker and starring Basil Sydney, Molly Lamont and Raymond Lovell. The film was based on Neil Gordon's novel The Shakespeare Murders, which also inspired The Claydon Treasure Mystery (1938). It was made at Wembley Studios as a quota quickie by the British subsidiary of 20th Century Fox.

The White Lilac is a 1935 British mystery film directed by Albert Parker and starring Basil Sydney, Judy Gunn, Claude Dampier and Percy Marmont. It is based upon the play of the same name by Ladislas Fodor. It was made at Wembley Studios as a quota quickie by the British subsidiary of Fox Film.

Fair Exchange is a 1936 British comedy film directed by Ralph Ince and starring Patric Knowles, Raymond Lovell and Cecil Humphreys. It was made at Teddington Studios as a quota quickie by the British subsidiary of Warner Brothers.

Down River is a 1931 British crime film directed by Peter Godfrey and starring Charles Laughton, Jane Baxter and Harold Huth. It was made at Lime Grove Studios with sets designed by Andrew Mazzei. Produced as a second feature, it is classified as a quota quickie.

Should a Doctor Tell? is a 1930 British drama film directed by H. Manning Haynes and starring Basil Gill, Norah Baring and Maurice Evans. The screenplay concerns a doctor who agonises over whether to tell his son that the woman he is marrying is pregnant by another man, which would mean breaking the hypocratic oath.

The Avenging Hand is a 1936 British crime film directed by Victor Hanbury and Frank Richardson and starring Noah Beery, Louis Borel and Kathleen Kelly.

Blind Folly is a 1939 British comedy film directed by Reginald Denham and starring Clifford Mollison, Lilli Palmer, and Leslie Perrins. The screenplay concerns a man who inherits a nightclub that belonged to his brother but soon discovers that it is the headquarters for a dangerous criminal gang.

The Girl Who Forgot is a 1940 British comedy film directed by Adrian Brunel and starring Elizabeth Allan, Ralph Michael and Enid Stamp-Taylor.

The Elder Brother is a 1937 British drama film directed by Frederick Hayward and starring John Stuart, Marjorie Taylor and Basil Langton. It was made at Shepperton Studios as a quota quickie for release by the Hollywood studio Paramount Pictures.

House Broken is a 1936 British comedy film directed by Michael Hankinson and starring Louis Borel, Jack Lambert and Mary Lawson. A wife tries to make her husband jealous by flirting with a Frenchman.

Contraband Love is a 1931 British crime film directed by Sidney Morgan and starring C. Aubrey Smith, Janice Adair and Haddon Mason. It was made at British and Dominions Elstree Studios and on location in Cornwall. The film was distributed by the American studio Paramount Pictures as a quota quickie.

<i>One Precious Year</i> 1933 British film

One Precious Year is a 1933 British drama film directed by Henry Edwards and starring Anne Grey, Basil Rathbone and Owen Nares. It was made at British and Dominion Elstree Studios by the British producer Herbert Wilcox for release by the British subsidiary of Paramount Pictures. The film's sets were designed by the art director C. Wilfred Arnold.

Late Extra is a 1935 British crime film directed by Albert Parker and starring James Mason, Virginia Cherrill, and Alastair Sim.

Ship's Concert is a 1937 British musical film directed by Leslie S. Hiscott and starring Claude Hulbert, Joyce Kirby and Henry Kendall. It was made as a quota quickie at Teddington Studios by the British subsidiary of Warner Brothers.

Pay Box Adventure is a 1936 British crime film directed by W. P. Kellino and starring Syd Crossley, Marjorie Corbett and Roxie Russell. It was made at Elstree Studios as a quota quickie.

The Beggar Student is a 1931 British operetta film directed by Victor Hanbury and John Harvel and starring Shirley Dale, Lance Fairfax and Jerry Verno. It was based on the 1882 operetta The Beggar Student composed by Carl Millöcker. A separate German film was made the same year.

Gaol Break is a 1936 British crime film directed by Ralph Ince and starring Ince, Basil Gill and Raymond Lovell.

References

  1. Wood p.89

Bibliography