The Five Pound Man

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The Five Pound Man
Directed by Albert Parker
Written by David Evans
Produced byAlbert Parker
Starring Judy Gunn
Edwin Styles
Charles Bannister
Cinematography Stanley Grant
Production
company
Distributed by20th Century Fox
Release date
24 March 1937
Running time
76 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

The Five Pound Man is a 1937 British comedy crime film directed by Albert Parker and starring Judy Gunn, Edwin Styles and Charles Bannister. [1] It was made at Wembley Studios as a quota quickie by the British subsidiary of 20th Century Fox. [2]

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References

  1. BFI.org
  2. Chibnall p.294

Bibliography