Bob Burns (Arizona politician)

Last updated
Robert "Bob" Burns
Bob Burns.jpg
Arizona Corporation Commissioner
Assumed office
January 2013
President of the Arizona Senate
In office
2009–2010
Preceded by Tim Bee
Succeeded by Russell Pearce
Member of the Arizona Senate
from the 9th district
In office
January 2003 January 2011
Succeeded by Rick Murphy
Member of the ArizonaHouseofRepresentatives
from the 17th district
In office
January 1989 January 2001
Preceded by Sterling Ridge
Succeeded by Phil Hanson
John B. Nelson
Personal details
Born (1938-05-26) May 26, 1938 (age 80)
Rolfe, Iowa, U.S.
Political party Republican
Spouse(s)Gayle Burns
ProfessionBusinessman

Robert Burns (born May 26, 1938) is a politician from Arizona. He currently serves on the Arizona Corporation Commission. Prior to that, he served in the Arizona State Senate, where in his final term, he was also elected as the President of the Senate. Before that he served six terms in the Arizona House of Representatives.

A politician is a person active in party politics, or a person holding or seeking office in government. Politicians propose, support and create laws or policies that govern the land and, by extension, its people. Broadly speaking, a "politician" can be anyone who seeks to achieve political power in any bureaucratic institution.

Arizona state of the United States of America

Arizona is a state in the southwestern region of the United States. It is also part of the Western and the Mountain states. It is the sixth largest and the 14th most populous of the 50 states. Its capital and largest city is Phoenix. Arizona shares the Four Corners region with Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico; its other neighboring states are Nevada and California to the west and the Mexican states of Sonora and Baja California to the south and southwest.

The Arizona Corporation Commission is the Public Utilities Commission of the State of Arizona, established by Article 15 of the Arizona Constitution. Arizona is one of only fourteen states with elected commissioners. The Arizona constitution explicitly calls for an elected commission, as opposed to a governor-appointed commission, which is the standard in most states, because its drafters feared that governors would appoint industry-friendly officials. They are directly elected statewide and serve staggered four-year terms.

Contents

Career

Robert Burns was a member of the Arizona House of Representatives and the Arizona State Senate. [1] He was elected to the House in 1988, [2] :viii-ix and serve in that body from January 1989 through January 2001, winning re-election five times. [3] :viii-ix [4] :viii-ix [5] :viii-ix [6] :viii-ix [7] :viii-ix He did not run in the November 2010 election. In the 2002 election he ran for the Senate in District 9, which was new due to redistricting, and won. [8] :vii He won re-election to the seat three times and served in the Senate from January 2003 through January 2011. [9] :vii [10] :vii During his last term in the Senate he was also elected as the President of the Senate. [11] :vii Due to Arizona's term limits, he was unable to run again for the Senate in the November 2010 election. In 2012 he ran for the Arizona Corporation Commission, and won. He won re-election to the Commission in the 2016, and is an incumbent on the Commission. [1] [12]

Arizona House of Representatives Lower house of U.S. state legislature

The Arizona House of Representatives is the lower house of the Arizona Legislature, the state legislature of the U.S. state of Arizona. The upper house is the Senate. Its members are elected to two-year terms with a term limit of four consecutive terms. Members of the Republican Party currently hold a majority in the House.

Burns played a key role in the development of the Arizona Telemedicine Council, initiating the legislation that created it, and serving as the first co-chairman of the council. [13]

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. 1 2 "Robert Burns". Ballotpedia. Archived from the original on March 16, 2019. Retrieved March 7, 2019.
  2. "Session laws, State of Arizona, 1989 Thirty-Ninth Legislature, First Regular Session". State of Arizona. Retrieved November 2, 2018.
  3. "Session laws, State of Arizona, 1991 Volume 2, Fourtieth Legislature, First Regular Session, Second to Fourth Special Sessions, Chapters 218 to End". State of Arizona. Retrieved November 19, 2018.
  4. "Session laws, State of Arizona, 1993 Volume 1, Forty-First Legislature, First Regular Session, Chapters 1 to 184". State of Arizona. Retrieved November 19, 2018.
  5. "Session laws, State of Arizona, 1995 Volume 1, Forty-Second Legislature, First Regular Session, Chapters 1 to 178". State of Arizona. Retrieved December 2, 2018.
  6. "Session laws, State of Arizona, 1997 Volume 1, Forty-Third Legislature, First Regular Session, Chapters 1 to 146". State of Arizona. Retrieved December 4, 2018.
  7. "Session laws, State of Arizona, 1999 Volume 1, Forty-Fourth Legislature, First Regular Session, Chapters 1 to 223". State of Arizona. Retrieved December 12, 2018.
  8. "Session laws, State of Arizona, 2003 Volume 1, Forty-Sixth Legislature, First Regular Session, Chapters 1 to 247". State of Arizona. Retrieved December 27, 2018.
  9. "Session laws, State of Arizona, 2005 Volume 1, Forty-Seventh Legislature, First Regular Session, Chapters 1 to 226". State of Arizona. Retrieved January 3, 2019.
  10. "Session laws, State of Arizona, 2007 Volume 1, Forty-Eighth Legislature, First Regular Session, Chapters 1 to 214". State of Arizona. Retrieved January 3, 2019.
  11. "Session laws, State of Arizona, 2009 Volume 1, Forty-Ninth Legislature, First Regular Session, Chapters 1 to 113". State of Arizona. Retrieved January 13, 2019.
  12. "Democrats ousted from utilities commission as GOP wins 3 seats"
  13. "Arizona Telemedicine Program - Background" Archived November 24, 2011, at the Wayback Machine , Retrieved on 2011-9-27.
Political offices
Preceded by
Tim Bee
President of the Arizona Senate
2009 2010
Succeeded by
Russell Pearce
Arizona Senate
Preceded by
Member of the Arizona Senate for the 9th District
2009 2011
Succeeded by
Rick Murphy