Bond of Association

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The Bond of Association was a document created in 1584 by Francis Walsingham and William Cecil after the failure of the Throckmorton Plot in 1583.

Francis Walsingham English spy, diplomat and politician

Sir Francis Walsingham was principal secretary to Queen Elizabeth I of England from 20 December 1573 until his death and is popularly remembered as her "spymaster".

William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley English statesman

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The Throckmorton Plot was an attempt, in 1583, by English Roman Catholics to organise an invasion of England by the Duke of Guise in order to depose Queen Elizabeth I of England and replace her with her first cousin once removed, Mary, Queen of Scots. The plot is named after the key conspirator, Sir Francis Throckmorton ; Francis confessed to the plot under torture.

Contents

Contents

The document obliged all signatories to execute any person that:

In the latter case, it also made it obligatory for the signatories to hunt down the killer.

Royal Approval

Elizabeth authorised the Bond to achieve statutory authority.

Implications

The Bond of Association was a key legal precedent for the execution of Mary, Queen of Scots, in 1587. Walsingham discovered alleged evidence that Mary, in a letter to Anthony Babington, had given her approval to a plot to assassinate Elizabeth and by Right of Succession take the English throne. Ironically, Mary herself was a signatory of the Bond.

Mary, Queen of Scots 16th-century Scottish ruler and queen consort of France

Mary, Queen of Scots, also known as Mary Stuart or Mary I of Scotland, reigned over Scotland from 14 December 1542 to 24 July 1567.

Anthony Babington English nobleman convicted of plotting the assassination of Elizabeth I of England

Sir Anthony Babington was an English nobleman convicted of plotting the assassination of Elizabeth I of England and conspiring with the imprisoned Mary, Queen of Scots. The "Babington Plot" and Mary's involvement in it were the basis of the treason charges against her which led to her execution. He was a member of the Babington family.

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References

Ridley, Jasper (1987). Elizabeth I: The Shrewdness of Virtue. Fromm International. p. 254.

O'Day, Rosemary (1995). The Tudor Age. England: Longman Group Limited.