Callistratus of Georgia

Last updated
Callistratus. 5 tsintsadze kalistrate.jpg
Callistratus.

St. Callistratus (Georgian :კალისტრატე, Kalistrate) (Kalistrate Tsintsadze) (April 24, 1866 – February 2, 1952) was a Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia from June 21, 1932 until his death. His full title was His Holiness and Beatitude, Archbishop of Mtskheta-Tbilisi and Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia.

Educated at the theological seminaries of Tiflis and Kiev, he was ordained to the priesthood at the Didube Church in 1893. He then served at the Kashueti Church (1903) and was involved in the Georgian autocephalist movement in defense of which he produced, in 1905, a special study of the Georgian Orthodox Church, which had been under the Russian control since 1810. After the reestablishment of the Georgian church in 1917, he was consecrated metropolitan at Ninotsminda in 1925 and bishop at Manglisi in 1927. After the imprisonment of Catholicos Patriarch Ambrose by the Soviet government, Callistratus was a locum tenens from 1923 to 1926. After his election to the patriarchate in 1932, following a brief reign of Christophorus III, Callistratus tried to pursue a conciliatory line with the Stalin's regime in order to ease the pressure from authorities. Through Stalin's mediation, Callistratus reconciled the Georgian church with its Russian counterpart, which in turn recognized the Georgian autocephaly in 1943. In 1948, he was appointed to the Soviet Peace Committee. Despite official Soviet atheist propaganda, Callistratus maintained that Christianity and Communism could coexist. [1] [2] He died in 1952 and was interred at the Tbilisi Sioni Cathedral. He was canonized by the Georgian Orthodox Church on 22 December 2016, his feast day set for 3 June (NS 21 May). [3]

Related Research Articles

Freedom of religions in Georgia is provided for by the country's constitution, laws, and policies. In practice, the Georgian government generally respects religious freedom; however, the Georgian Orthodox Church enjoys a privileged status in terms of legal and tax matters, involvement in public schools, and property disputes. There have been efforts by private citizens, local government officials, and local Georgian Orthodox Church leaders to harass and persecute members of minority religious groups and interfere with their worship activities; despite calls for tolerance and respect for pluralism by government leaders, the Georgian central government has not been successful in preventing such incidents.

Georgian Orthodox Church National Eastern Orthodox church

The Apostolic Autocephalous Orthodox Church of Georgia, commonly known as the Georgian Orthodox Church or the Orthodox Church of Georgia, is an autocephalous Eastern Orthodox church in full communion with the other churches of Eastern Orthodoxy. It is Georgia's dominant religious institution, and a majority of Georgian people are members. The Orthodox Church of Georgia is one of the oldest churches in the world. It asserts apostolic foundation, and that its historical roots can be traced to the early and late Christianization of Iberia and Colchis by Saint Andrew in the 1st century AD and by Saint Nino in the 4th century AD, respectively. As in similar autocephalous Orthodox Christian churches, the church's highest governing body is the holy synod of bishops. The church is headed by the Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia, Ilia II, who was elected in 1977.

Ilia II of Georgia 20th and 21st-century Patriarch of the Georgian Orthodox Church

Ilia II, also transliterated as Ilya or Elijah, is the Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia and the spiritual leader of the Georgian Orthodox Church. He is officially styled as Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia, the Archbishop of Mtskheta-Tbilisi and Metropolitan Bishop of Bichvinta and Tskhum-Abkhazia, His Holiness and Beatitude Ilia II.

Ambrosius of Georgia Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia (1921-1927)

St. Ambrosius was a Georgian religious figure and scholar who served as the Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia from 1921 to 1927. Best known for his opposition to the Soviet regime, he was canonized in 1995 by the Georgian Orthodox Church as Saint Ambrosius the Confessor.

Grigol Peradze Georgian theologian

Saint Grigol Peradze was a prominent Georgian ecclesiastic figure, philologist, theologian, historian, and professor of patristics in the interwar period.

Patriarch Alexy I of Moscow

Patriarch Alexy I was the 13th Patriarch of Moscow and all Rus', Primate of the Russian Orthodox Church (ROC) between 1945 and 1970.

Tbilisi Sioni Cathedral Orthodox Christian cathedral in Tbilisi, Georgia

The Sioni Cathedral of the Dormition is a Georgian Orthodox cathedral in Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia. Following a medieval Georgian tradition of naming churches after particular places in the Holy Land, the Sioni Cathedral bears the name of Mount Zion at Jerusalem. It is commonly known as the "Tbilisi Sioni" to distinguish it from several other churches across Georgia bearing the name Sioni.

Kyrion II of Georgia Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia (1917-1918)

St. Kyrion II was a Georgian religious figure and historian who served as the first Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia after the restoration of independence (autocephaly) of the Georgian Orthodox Church from the Russian Orthodox Church in 1917 until his assassination in 1918. He was canonized by the Georgian Holy Synod in 2002.

Leonid of Georgia Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia (1918-1921)

Leonid (Leonidas) was a Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia from 1918 to 1921.

Christophorus III Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia (1927-1932)

Christophorus III was a Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia from 1927 until his death.

Religion in Georgia (country) Religion in the country

The wide variety of peoples inhabiting Georgia has meant a correspondingly rich array of active religions in the country. Today most of the population in Georgia practices Orthodox Christianity, primarily in the Georgian Orthodox Church, whose faithful make up 83.4% of the population. Around 1% belong to the Russian Orthodox Church, while about 3.9% of the population follow the Armenian Apostolic Church, almost all of which are ethnic Armenians. Adherents of Islam make up 10.7% of the population and are mainly found in the Adjara and Kvemo Kartli regions and as a sizeable minority in Tbilisi. Catholics of the Armenian and Latin churches make up around 0.8% of the population and are mainly found in the south of Georgia and a small number in Tbilisi. There is also a sizeable Jewish community in Tbilisi served by two synagogues.

Christianity in Georgia (country) Aspect of religious life in Georgia

Today 84% of the population in Georgia practices Orthodox Christianity, primarily the Georgian Orthodox Church. Of these, around 2% follow the Russian Orthodox Church, around 5.9% follow the Armenian Apostolic Church and 0.8% are Catholics and are mainly found in the south of Georgia but with a small number in its capital, Tbilisi.

Norashen Church

Norashen is a non-functioning Armenian Apostolic church in Tbilisi, Georgia. It is located in the old town, near Sioni Cathedral and Jvaris Mama Church.

Melchizedek III of Georgia Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia (1952-1960)

Melchizedek III was a Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia from 1952 until his death. His full title was His Holiness and Beatitude, Archbishop of Mtskheta-Tbilisi and Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia.

Ephraim II of Georgia Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia (1960-1972)

Ephraim II was a Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia from 1960 until his death. His full title was His Holiness and Beatitude, Archbishop of Mtskheta-Tbilisi and Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia.

David V, Catholicos-Patriarch of Georgia Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia (1972-1977)

David V (Georgian: დავით V, born as Khariton Devdariani was a Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia from July 2, 1972, until his death. His full title was His Holiness and Beatitude, Archbishop of Mtskheta-Tbilisi and Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia.

Skhalta Cathedral Cathedral and monastery in Adjara, Georgia

The Skhalta Cathedral is a Georgian Orthodox monastery and cathedral church in Adjara, Georgia, dating from the mid-13th century. It is a large hall church design, with fragments of the 14th or 15th century Paleologian-style wall painting.

Georgia–Holy See relations Bilateral relations

Georgia – Holy See relations are bilateral relations between Georgia and the Holy See. The diplomatic relations between the two were established on May 5, 1992. The Georgian Embassy to the Holy See is located in 25 Via Toscana, Rome. The Apostolic Nunciature is located in 40 Zghenti Street, Tbilisi.

Anton II of Georgia

Anton II the Great Martyr, born Prince Royal Teimuraz, was a member of the Georgian royal family and churchman. A son of Heraclius II, the penultimate King of Kartli and Kakheti, he was the Catholicos Patriarch of Georgia from 1788 to 1811.

Sergo Vardosanidze

Sergo Vardosanidze is a Georgian historian, Professor and a Rector of the Saint Andrew the First-Called Georgian University of the Patriarchate of Georgia.

References

  1. Shirley, Eugene B. (1991), Candle in the wind: religion in the Soviet Union, p. 42. Ethics and Public Policy Center
  2. Kolarz, Walter (1962), Religion in the Soviet Union, p. 103. Macmillan
  3. "წმინდა სინოდმა წმინდანებად ორი მეფე - ბაგრატ მესამე და სოლომონ პირველი, ასევე, კათოლიკოს-პატრიარქი კალისტრატე ცინცაძე შერაცხა". Georgian Times. 22 December 2016. Retrieved 25 December 2016.
Eastern Orthodox Church titles
Preceded by
Christophorus III
Catholicos-Patriarch of All Georgia
1932–1952
Succeeded by
Melchizedek III