Carolina Courage

Last updated
Carolina Courage
Cour.png
logo created by artist Ancel Cott
Full name Carolina Courage
Nickname(s) Courage
Founded 2001
Ground SAS Stadium, Cary, North Carolina
Capacity 7,130
Owner Time Warner Cable
League Women's United Soccer Association

Carolina Courage was a professional soccer team that played in the Women's United Soccer Association. The team played at Fetzer Field on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus in 2001, and then at the soccer-specific SAS Stadium in Cary, North Carolina in 2002 and 2003. [1]

Womens United Soccer Association

The Women's United Soccer Association, often abbreviated to the WUSA, was the world's first women's soccer league in which all the players were paid as professionals. Founded in February 2000, the league began its first season in April 2001 with eight teams in the United States. The league suspended operations on September 15, 2003, shortly after the end of its third season, after making cumulative losses of around US $100 million.

Fetzer Field

Robert Fetzer Field was a sports field located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and was the home of the lacrosse and soccer teams of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the North Carolina Tar Heels. The four teams that called Fetzer field their home have a combined total of 26 national championships. The stadium was demolished in 2017 to make way for the Soccer/Lacrosse Stadium that was built on the same site.

Cary, North Carolina Place in North Carolina, United States

Cary is the seventh-largest municipality in North Carolina. Cary is predominantly in Wake County, with a small area in Chatham County in the U.S. state of North Carolina and is the county's second-largest municipality, as well as the third-largest municipality in The Triangle of North Carolina after Raleigh and Durham.

Contents

History

The team was founded in 2000 and began play in 2001. After finishing the 2001 season in last place, the Carolina Courage won the 2002 Founders Cup, defeating the Washington Freedom 3–2. [2] [3] In 2003, the Carolina Courage finished 7th in the league with seven wins, nine losses, and four ties. [4]

Washington Freedom

The Washington Freedom was an American professional soccer club based in the Washington, D.C., suburb of Germantown, Maryland, that participated in Women's Professional Soccer. The Freedom was founded in 2001 as a member of the defunct Women's United Soccer Association. Beginning in 2004, the Freedom played its home games at the Maryland SoccerPlex. In 2011, the team relocated to Boca Raton, Florida, and became magicJack.

The Women's United Soccer Association announced on September 15, 2003 that it was suspending operations. [5]

Players

2003 Roster [6]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

As the governing body of association football, FIFA is responsible for maintaining and implementing the rules that determine whether an association football player is eligible to represent a particular country in officially recognised international competitions and friendly matches. In the 20th century, FIFA allowed a player to represent any national team, as long as the player held citizenship of that country. In 2004, in reaction to the growing trend towards naturalisation of foreign players in some countries, FIFA implemented a significant new ruling that requires a player to demonstrate a "clear connection" to any country they wish to represent. FIFA has used its authority to overturn results of competitive international matches that feature ineligible players.

No.PositionPlayer
23 Flag of the United States.svg DF Erin Baxter
15 Flag of the United States.svg DF Danielle Borgman
8 Flag of Canada.svg FW Breanna Boyd
1 Flag of the United States.svg GK Meghann Burke
3 Flag of the United States.svg DF Staci Burt
13 Flag of the United States.svg DF Nel Fettig
6 Flag of the United States.svg FW Danielle Fotopoulos
16 Flag of the United States.svg MF Venus James
7 Flag of Norway.svg MF Unni Lehn
2 Flag of the United States.svg GK Kristin Luckenbill
No.PositionPlayer
19 Flag of the United States.svg FW Robin McCullough
11 Flag of the United States.svg MF Kim Montgomery
12 Flag of the United States.svg DF Brooke O'Hanley
4 Flag of the United States.svg DF Carla Overbeck
9 Flag of Germany.svg FW Birgit Prinz
10 Flag of Norway.svg MF Hege Riise
5 Flag of the United States.svg MF Tiffany Roberts
17 Flag of the United States.svg DF Danielle Slaton
14 Flag of the United States.svg FW Marcia Wallis
22 Flag of the United States.svg GK Maite Zabala

Coach: Jay Entlich Assistant Coach: Susan Hill Assistant Coach: Scott Calabrese

See also

Womens professional sports

Professional athletes are distinguished from amateur athletes by virtue of being paid enough to earn a living. Throughout the world, most top female athletes are not paid, and work full-time or part-time jobs in addition to their training, practice and competition schedules. Women's professional sports organizations defy this trend. Such organizations are relatively new, and are most common in very economically developed countries, where investors are available to buy teams, and businesses can afford to sponsor them in exchange for publicity and promotion of their products. Very few governments support professional sports, male or female.

Womens association football association football when played by women

Women's association football, also commonly known as women's football or women's soccer is the most prominent team sport played by women around the globe. It is played at the professional level in numerous countries throughout the world and 176 national teams participate internationally.

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References

  1. "Carolina Courage profile". Soccer Times. Retrieved 23 September 2012.
  2. "Slaton, Carolina Courage Win WUSA Title". Santa Clara University. Retrieved 23 September 2012.
  3. Glier, Ray (26 August 2002). "Carolina captures WUSA championship". USA Today. Retrieved 23 September 2012.
  4. "WUSA 2003 Standings". USA Today. 27 May 2003. Retrieved 23 September 2012.
  5. Michaelis, Vicki (16 September 2003). "WUSA ceases operations after three years". USA Today. Retrieved 23 September 2012.
  6. "2003 Carolina Courage roster". Carolina Courage. Archived from the original on June 9, 2003. Retrieved 23 September 2012.