Philadelphia Charge

Last updated
Philadelphia Charge
Philly Charge.PNG
Founded10 April 2000 [1]
Name established on
2 November 2000 [2]
Dissolved15 September 2003
Ground Villanova Stadium
Bryn Mawr, PA 19010
Capacity12,500
Owner Comcast
General ManagerTim Murphy
Head Coach Mark Krikorian
League Women's United Soccer Association
Final season
2003

8th

The Philadelphia Charge was an American women's professional soccer team that played in the Women's United Soccer Association. The team played at Villanova Stadium on the campus of Villanova University near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Womens United Soccer Association

The Women's United Soccer Association, often abbreviated to the WUSA, was the world's first women's soccer league in which all the players were paid as professionals. Founded in February 2000, the league began its first season in April 2001 with eight teams in the United States. The league suspended operations on September 15, 2003, shortly after the end of its third season, after making cumulative losses of around US $100 million.

Villanova Stadium is a 12,500 seat stadium located on the campus of Villanova University in Villanova, Pennsylvania, USA.

Villanova University Catholic university near Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Villanova University is a private research university in Radnor Township, Pennsylvania Named after Saint Thomas of Villanova, the school is the oldest Catholic university in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Contents

History

The team was founded in 2000 and began play in 2001 in the inaugural season of the Women's United Soccer Association.

Players

Several notable U.S. Women's National Team stars made their pro debuts with the Charge, including defender Heather Mitts (2001-2003) and goalkeeper Hope Solo, who appeared in 8 matches as a rookie backup goalkeeper in 2003. Other notables included French international Marinette Pichon, who won the 2002 WUSA Most Valuable Player award for the Charge, and English star Kelly Smith. [3]

Heather Mitts American soccer player, Olympic gold medalist

Heather Mitts Feeley, née Heather Blaine Mitts, is an American former professional soccer defender. Mitts played college soccer for the University of Florida, and thereafter, she played professionally in the Women's Professional Soccer (WPS) league; for the Philadelphia Charge, Boston Breakers, Philadelphia Independence and Atlanta Beat. She is a three-time Olympic gold medalist, and was a member of the U.S. women's national team. She played in four matches in the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup, where the U.S. national team finished second. Mitts announced her retirement from soccer via Twitter on March 13, 2013.

Hope Solo American association football player

Hope Amelia Solo is an American soccer goalkeeper. She was the goalkeeper for the United States women's national soccer team from 2000 through August 2016, and is a two-time Olympic gold medalist and World Cup champion. After playing at the collegiate level for the University of Washington, she played professionally for the Philadelphia Charge in the Women's United Soccer Association (WUSA). When the WUSA folded after her first season, she traveled to Europe to play for the top division leagues in Sweden and France. From 2009 to 2011, she played in the Women's Professional Soccer (WPS) for Saint Louis Athletica, Atlanta Beat and magicJack. After the WPS ceased operations in early 2012, she played for the Seattle Sounders in the W-League. She most recently played for Seattle Reign FC in the National Women's Soccer League, the top division of women's soccer in the United States.

Marinette Pichon is a French former football player.

2003 Roster [4]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

As the governing body of association football, FIFA is responsible for maintaining and implementing the rules that determine whether an association football player is eligible to represent a particular country in officially recognised international competitions and friendly matches. In the 20th century, FIFA allowed a player to represent any national team, as long as the player held citizenship of that country. In 2004, in reaction to the growing trend towards naturalisation of foreign players in some countries, FIFA implemented a significant new ruling that requires a player to demonstrate a "clear connection" to any country they wish to represent. FIFA has used its authority to overturn results of competitive international matches that feature ineligible players.

No.PositionPlayer
1 Flag of the United States.svg GK Melissa Moore
2 Flag of the United States.svg MF Lorrie Fair
3 Flag of the United States.svg FW Emily Burt
5 Flag of the United States.svg DF Karyn Hall
6 Flag of the United States.svg DF Jenny Benson
7 Flag of Finland.svg MF Anne Makinen
8 Flag of England.svg FW Kelly Smith
9 Flag of the Czech Republic.svg MF Pavlína Ščasná
10 Flag of the United States.svg FW Deliah Arrington
11 Flag of France.svg FW Marinette Pichon
No.PositionPlayer
12 Flag of the United States.svg MF Erin Misaki
13 Flag of the United States.svg DF Heather Mitts
14 Flag of the United States.svg MF Rachel Kruze
15 Flag of the United States.svg MF Stacey Tullock
16 Flag of Germany.svg MF Melanie Hoffmann
18 Flag of the United States.svg GK Hope Solo
19 Flag of the United States.svg DF Alexa Borisjuk
21 Flag of the United States.svg FW Trina Maso De Moya
22 Flag of the United States.svg MF Mary McVeigh
25 Flag of the United States.svg MF Jennifer Tietjen-Prozzo

Coach: Mark Krikorian

Year-by-year regular season record

YearWLTPtsPosGFGAHomeAway
2001984314th/835285-3-24-5-2
20021146392nd/836227-1-34-3-3
20035115208th/830403-4-32-7-2

Awards

In 2001, Philadelphia Charge player, Doris Fitschen was named WUSA Defender of the Year. [5]

Doris Fitschen German football player

Doris Fitschen is a retired German football midfielder.

In 2002, Philadelphia Charge player, Marinette Pichon was named WUSA's Most Valuable Player and Offensive Player of the Year and was the co-recipient with Mia Hamm for Goal of the Year for a scissor kick volley against the San Diego Spirit. Goalkeeper Melissa Moore was awarded Goalkeeper of the Year and Stacey Tullock was named Rookie of the Year. Coach Mark Krikorian took the honor of WUSA Coach of the Year the same year. [6]

Mia Hamm American association football player

Mariel Margaret Hamm-Garciaparra is an American retired professional soccer player, two-time Olympic gold medalist, and two-time FIFA Women's World Cup champion. Hailed as a soccer icon, she played as a forward for the United States women's national soccer team from 1987–2004. Hamm was the face of the Women's United Soccer Association (WUSA), the first professional women's soccer league in the United States, where she played for the Washington Freedom from 2001–2003. She played college soccer for the North Carolina Tar Heels women's soccer team and helped the team win four consecutive NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Championship titles.

San Diego Spirit

The San Diego Spirit was a professional soccer team that played in the Women's United Soccer Association. The team played at Torero Stadium on the campus of the University of San Diego in San Diego, California. The team began play in 2001. The league announced on September 15, 2003 it was suspending operations.

Mark Krikorian (soccer) American soccer coach

Mark Krikorian is an American soccer coach, who has been in charge of the Florida State Seminoles women's soccer program since 2005.

In 2003, the Charge was awarded the WUSA Team Fair Play Award and defender, Jenny Benson, was named WUSA Humanitarian of the Year. [7]

League Suspension

The Women's United Soccer Association announced on September 15, 2003 that it was suspending operations. [8] [9]

See also

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References

  1. "Women's soccer in deals". CNNfn. April 10, 2000. Retrieved October 26, 2013.
  2. Trecker, Jerry (November 3, 2000). "Wusa: From Heat To Rays". Hartford Courant . Retrieved October 26, 2013.
  3. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-06-02. Retrieved 2012-07-06.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  4. "2003 Philadelphia Charge Roster". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 21 October 2012.
  5. "Power forward selected as first WUSA MVP". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 21 October 2012.
  6. "Philadelphia's Pichon takes top honor in WUSA awards". USA Today. 22 August 2002. Retrieved 21 October 2012.
  7. "Meinert wins most valuable player". USA Today. 21 August 2003. Retrieved 21 October 2012.
  8. Michaelis, Vicki (16 September 2003). "WUSA ceases operations after three years". USA Today. Retrieved 21 October 2012.
  9. "U.S. WNT Responds to Women's United Soccer Association Suspending Operations". US Soccer. Retrieved 21 October 2012.