Fetzer Field

Last updated

Robert Fetzer Field
UNC Women's Soccer.jpg
Full nameIrwin Belk Track at Robert Fetzer Field
LocationSouth Rd, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA
Owner University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Operator University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Capacity 5,025
SurfaceField: Natural grass
Track: Full-depth Polyurethene ISS 2000 encapsulated
Construction
Opened1935
Renovated1988–1990
Demolished2017
Tenants
North Carolina Tar Heels (NCAA) 1935-

Robert Fetzer Field was a sports field located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and was the home of the lacrosse and soccer teams of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the North Carolina Tar Heels. The four teams that called Fetzer field their home (North Carolina Tar Heels men's lacrosse, North Carolina Tar Heels women's lacrosse, North Carolina Tar Heels men's soccer, North Carolina Tar Heels women's soccer) have a combined total of 26 national championships. The stadium was demolished in 2017 to make way for the Soccer/Lacrosse Stadium that was built on the same site. [1]

Chapel Hill, North Carolina town in Orange County, North Carolina, United States

Chapel Hill is a town in Orange, Chatham, and Durham counties in the U.S. state of North Carolina. Its population was 57,233 in the 2010 census, making Chapel Hill the 15th-largest city in the state. Chapel Hill, Durham, and the state capital, Raleigh, make up the corners of the Research Triangle, with a total population of 1,998,808.

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill public research university in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, also known as UNC-Chapel Hill, UNC, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, or simply Carolina is a public research university in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. It is the flagship of the 17 campuses of the University of North Carolina system. After being chartered in 1789, the university first began enrolling students in 1795, which also allows it to be one of three schools to claim the title of the oldest public university in the United States. Among the claimants, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is the only one to have held classes and graduated students as a public university in the eighteenth century.

North Carolina Tar Heels intercollegiate sports teams of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

The North Carolina Tar Heels are the athletic teams representing the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The name Tar Heel is a nickname used to refer to individuals from the state of North Carolina, the Tar Heel State. The campus at Chapel Hill is referred to as the University of North Carolina for the purposes of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was chartered in 1789, and in 1795 it became the first state-supported university in the United States. Since the school fostered the oldest collegiate team in the Carolinas, the school took on the nickname ""Carolina", especially in athletics. The Tar Heels are also referred to as North Carolina, UNC, or The Heels. The female athletic teams are sometimes referred to as Lady Tar Heels.

Contents

The North Carolina Tar Heels teams that played at Fetzer Field were among the most popular college sports clubs on social media. The Ohio State Buckeyes (2,105,974), Florida Gators (2,003,534), Texas Longhorns (1,784,708), Oregon Ducks (1,687,733), Georgia Bulldogs (1,290,903), Kentucky Wildcats (1,284,612), North Carolina Tar Heels (1,260,567) and Wisconsin Badgers (1,238,828) had the most followers as of January 2016. [2]

Ohio State Buckeyes intercollegiate sports teams of Ohio State University

The Ohio State Buckeyes are the athletic teams that represent Ohio State University, located in Columbus, Ohio. The athletic programs are named after the colloquial term for people from the state of Ohio and after the state tree, the Ohio Buckeye. The Buckeyes participate in the National Collegiate Athletic Association's (NCAA) Division I in all sports and the Big Ten Conference in most sports. The Ohio State women's ice hockey team competes in the Western Collegiate Hockey Association (WCHA). The school colors are scarlet and gray. Ohio State's mascot is Brutus Buckeye.

Florida Gators Intercollegiate sports teams of the University of Florida

The Florida Gators are the athletic teams that represent the University of Florida. The University of Florida, its athletic program, its alumni and its sports fans are often collectively referred to as the "Gator Nation." The Gators compete in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Southeastern Conference (SEC) and are consistently ranked among the top college sports programs in the United States. The University of Florida currently fields teams in nine men's sports and twelve women's sports.

Texas Longhorns Intercollegiate sports teams of the University of Texas

The Texas Longhorns are the athletic teams that represent The University of Texas at Austin. The teams are sometimes referred to as the 'Horns and take their name from Longhorn cattle that were an important part of the development of Texas, and are now the official "large animal" of the U.S. state of Texas. The women's teams are sometimes called the Lady Longhorns, but generally both the men's and women's teams are referred to as the Longhorns, and the mascot is a Texas Longhorn steer named Bevo.

Construction

Fetzer Field was built in 1935 and named for Bob Fetzer, the school's first full-time athletic director. [3] The original part of the complex, including the track, grandstand and field, was built in 1935 as a part of the government's Works Projects Administration (WPA). The construction provided jobs to the people living in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Renovations began in 1988 when the playing field was redone and several additions were made, which included two new ticket booths, new bleachers and a concession stand. [3]

Bob Fetzer American football coach, track and field coach, and college athletics administrator

Robert Allison Fetzer was an American football coach, track and field coach, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Davidson College in 1914 and as co-head football coach at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with his brother, Bill, from 1921 to 1925, compiling a career college football record of 35–13–5. Fetzer was also the head track coach at North Carolina from 1921 to 1952 and the school's athletic director from 1923 to 1952.

History of the teams

The first team to play on the field was the men's soccer team after its inception in 1947. They played alone for two years until the inception of the men's lacrosse team in 1949. These teams would call Fetzer home for three decades before the women's soccer team was created in 1979. At the time 24-year-old Anson Dorrance was named head coach of both the men's and women's soccer teams. He continued to coach both teams until 1989 when he started solely coaching the women's soccer team. Dorrance is still the women's coach, and the winningest soccer coach in the nation. [3]

North Carolina Tar Heels womens soccer

The North Carolina Tar Heels women's soccer team represent the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the Atlantic Coast Conference of NCAA Division I soccer. The team has won 20 of the 27 Atlantic Coast Conference championships, and 22 of the 36 NCAA national championships.

Anson Dorrance American soccer player-coach

Albert Anson Dorrance IV is an American soccer coach. He is currently the head coach of the women's soccer program at the University of North Carolina. He has one of the most successful coaching records in the history of athletics. Under Dorrance's leadership, the Tar Heels have won 21 of the 31 NCAA Women's Soccer Championships. The Tar Heels' record under Dorrance stood at 809-67-36 over 33 seasons at the end of the 2017 season. He has led his team to a 101-game unbeaten streak and coached 13 different women to a total of 20 National Player of the Year awards. The NCAA has recognized Dorrance as the Women's Soccer Coach of the Year seven times and as the Men's Soccer Coach of the Year in 1987. On March 10, 2008 Dorrance was elected to the National Soccer Hall of Fame.

Men's and women's lacrosse, both national champions in the past, also play on Fetzer Field on spring days. The men's program has won multiple NCAA Championships: 1981, 1982, 1986, 1991, and 2016. The Tar Heels women's team won the NCAA Championship both in 2013, in a triple-overtime win over the multiple-championship program from the University of Maryland, and in 2016. Both are perennially very competitive programs.

Notable players

Fetzer Field has been the home field to multiple players that would eventually play soccer professionally or for the national team. Fetzer has been the home of many nationally recognized women’s soccer players. The following players have been named national player of the year for women's soccer:

April Heinrichs association football player

April Dawn Heinrichs was among the first players on the United States women's national soccer team, and was captain of the United States team which won the first ever FIFA Women's World Cup in 1991. She finished her international playing career with 46 caps and 35 goals. Heinrich coached the USA women's team from 2000 to 2004, under her tenure team USA finished third in 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, won silver medal at Sydney 2000, and gold medal at Athens 2004 Olympics. In 1998 she became the first female player inducted into the National Soccer Hall of Fame. In January 2011, Heinrichs was appointed Technical Director for women's soccer by United States Soccer Federation.

Shannon Danise Higgins-Cirovski is a former U.S. soccer midfielder who earned fifty-one caps with the United States between 1987 and 1991. She was a member of the U.S. team at the 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup and is a member of the National Soccer Hall of Fame.

Kristine Lilly US-American soccer player

Kristine Marie Lilly Heavey, née Kristine Marie Lilly, is a retired American soccer player who last played professionally for Boston Breakers in Women's Professional Soccer (WPS). She was a member of the United States women's national football team for 23 years and is the most capped football player in the history of the sport gaining her 352nd and final cap against Mexico in a World Cup qualifier in November 2010. Lilly scored 130 goals for the United States women's national team, behind Mia Hamm's 158 goals, and Abby Wambach's 184.

In the 2011 Women's World Cup two UNC women's soccer players, Tobin Heath and Heather O'Reilly, saw the playing field. In December 2011 six former Tar Heels – Tobin Heath, Heather O'Reilly, Yael Averbuch, Ashlyn Harris, Megan Klingenberg – were called up to play at the National Team camp. [5] All these players spent their collegiate careers at Fetzer Field.

Tobin Heath American soccer player

Tobin Powell Heath is an American professional soccer player. She currently plays professionally for Portland Thorns FC of the National Women's Soccer League (NWSL) and the United States women's national soccer team. She is a two-time Olympic gold medalist and a two-time FIFA Women's World Cup winner with the United States women's national soccer team. She has also won two NWSL Championships with the Portland Thorns. Heath is described as "perhaps the USA's most skillful player" by the United States Soccer Federation, and she was voted the U.S. Soccer Athlete of the Year in 2016. Heath usually plays as a forward or an attacking midfielder and primarily on the right side. She was the first overall pick in Women's Professional Soccer 2010 draft. Heath's career started with the New Jersey Wildcats in 2004–05, Hudson Valley Quickstrike Lady Blues in 2007 and Pali Blues in 2009. Her college career was with the North Carolina Tar Heels between 2006 and 2009 coinciding with her time on the Hudson Valley Quickstrike Lady Blues. Her professional career began in the Women's Professional Soccer league, spending one season (2010) with Atlanta Beat, one season with Sky Blue FC (2011) and one season with the New York Fury until the Women's Professional Soccer league folded in 2012. She played in France with Paris Saint-Germain for the 2013–14 season before moving on to her current club, Portland Thorns FC, when the NWSL was established.

Legacy

Fetzer Field does not see many losses overall. It is most famous for being the home of the UNC women's soccer team, which rarely loses more than two home games in a season. Four teams (both men's and women's soccer, as well as both men's and women's lacrosse) that play on Fetzer have earned at least one national championship. In its 32 years of existence the women's soccer team has won 21 of the national championships in the sport; the most recent was in 2012. The men's soccer team has won two national championships; the men's lacrosse team has won four national championship since its inception. [6] Woman's lacrosse won the NCAA Championship in 2013.

Many of the most famous women's soccer players have attended the University of North Carolina. Mia Hamm, who Bleacher Report says is the greatest women’s soccer player of all time, [7] played on Fetzer field for four years. Also, since 1957 the men's soccer team has not had a losing season. [8] In 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2011 the men's soccer team made it to the NCAA final four, and in 2011 advanced to the National Championship. The men's lacrosse team made it to the NCAA quarterfinals in 2009 and 2010. The women's lacrosse team advanced to the NCAA final four in 2009 and 2010. [9]

Attendance

The Tar Heels have long been among the nation's attendance leaders in men's and women's soccer. The record crowd for Fetzer Field was 7,212 people in 1995, who watched the women's soccer team lose to Notre Dame in the semifinals. The highest attended regular season game occurred in 1998 when the Tar Heels defeated Notre Dame, 5-1, with 6,024 people in attendance. In the 2011 NCAA elite eight men's soccer game against St. Mary's College Fetzer Field officially sold out. [3]

McCaskill Soccer Center and Belk Track

In 1997 the 'soccer hut' which had been used for both soccer teams at UNC since the 1970s was leveled, making way for a new soccer building. Athletic director Dick Baddour agreed that the soccer hut was out of date and needed to be updated. The new building was named McCaskill after Bud and Mildred McCaskill, dedicated donors to UNC. McCaskill was dedicated in 1999. The building has locker rooms for both men and women's teams and offices for both coaches. It was estimated the project cost the school roughly $1.7 million. [8] The building is located at the North corner of Fetzer Field and Belk track. Belk track was installed in 1988 during the reconstruction of Fetzer Field. It is Carolina blue in color and is an international style track. [8]

Other uses

Fetzer Field was home to the North Carolina High School Athletic Association track and field state championships. It has also hosted the Junior Olympics. [3] Several foundations host fundraisers on Fetzer. Mia Hamm, former UNC women's soccer player and founder of the Mia Hamm foundation, gave a speech during the halftime of games in 2010 and 2011 to raise awareness for bone marrow donations. Also Relay for Life is annually hosted on Fetzer Field. [10]

Related Research Articles

North Carolina Tar Heels mens basketball

The North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball program is the intercollegiate men's basketball team of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The Tar Heels have won seven NCAA men's college national championships. North Carolina's six NCAA Tournament Championships are third-most all-time, behind University of California, Los Angeles(11) and University of Kentucky(8). They have also won 18 Atlantic Coast Conference tournament titles, 32 Atlantic Coast Conference regular season titles, and an Atlantic Coast Conference record 20 outright Regular Season Championships. The program has produced many notable players who went on to play in the NBA, including three of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History: Billy Cunningham, Michael Jordan and James Worthy. Many Tar Heel assistant coaches have gone on to become head coaches elsewhere.

2008–09 North Carolina Tar Heels mens basketball team 2009 NCAA Division I Mens Basketball Champion

The 2008–09 North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball team represented the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The head coach was Roy Williams. The team played its home games in the Dean Smith Center in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and was a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference. The team won the 2009 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament, the fifth NCAA national title in school history.

2009–10 North Carolina Tar Heels mens basketball team 2010 NIT Finalist

The 2009–10 North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball team represented the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Their head coach was Roy Williams. The team played its home games in the Dean Smith Center in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and is a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference. They were the defending National Champions. This season represented the 100th season of basketball in the school's history.

The North Carolina Tar Heels men's lacrosse team represents the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I men's lacrosse. North Carolina currently competes as a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) and plays its home games at Fetzer Field and Kenan Memorial Stadium in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Elmar Bolowich is the head coach of the Creighton Bluejays men's soccer team at Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska. He began at Creighton University after leaving his 22-year tenure as the head coach of the North Carolina Tar Heels men's soccer team at the University of North Carolina.

North Carolina Tar Heels mens soccer

The North Carolina Tar Heels men's soccer team represents the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in men's NCAA Division I soccer competition. They compete in the Atlantic Coast Conference. The Tar Heels won the NCAA championship in 2001 and 2011.

UCF Knights womens soccer

The UCF Knights women's soccer program represents the University of Central Florida in National Collegiate Athletics Association (NCAA) Division I. The Knights compete in the American Athletic Conference and play their home games on UCF's main campus in Orlando, Florida at the UCF Soccer and Track Stadium. The Knights are led by head coach and Olympic gold medalist Tiffany Roberts Sahaydak.

North Carolina Tar Heels womens lacrosse

The North Carolina Tar Heels women's lacrosse team represents the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I women's lacrosse and currently competes as a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). The North Carolina women's lacrosse team won the ACC tournament in 2002 and their first Division 1 National Championship in 2013.

Linda Hamilton (soccer) American soccer player

Linda A. Hamilton is an American retired soccer defender and former member of the United States women's national soccer team. She is currently head coach of the women's soccer team at the Southwestern University. Hamilton was inducted into the Georgia Soccer Hall of Fame in 2001.

The 2014 ACC women's and men's lacrosse conferences will include Notre Dame and Syracuse after those teams joined the ACC in July 2013. The 2014 ACC women's lacrosse conference will now include eight teams. This will be the only year that the ACC women's lacrosse conference will include these eight teams as Maryland will leave the ACC for the Big Ten at the end of the 2014 season. Boston College plays in the women's ACC conference, but not the men's conference.

The 1984 NCAA Women's Soccer Tournament was the third annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA women's collegiate soccer. The championship game was again played at Fetzer Field in Chapel Hill, North Carolina during December 1984.

The 1988 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament was the seventh annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. This was the first championship for just Division I programs. The championship game was played again at Fetzer Field in Chapel Hill, North Carolina during December 1988.

The 1990 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament was the ninth annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The championship game was played at Fetzer Field in Chapel Hill, North Carolina during December 1990.

The 1991 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament was the 10th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The championship game was played at Fetzer Field in Chapel Hill, North Carolina during December 1991.

The 1992 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament was the 11th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The championship game was played at Fetzer Field in Chapel Hill, North Carolina during December 1992.

The 1993 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament was the 12th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The championship game was played at Fetzer Field in Chapel Hill, North Carolina during December 1993.

The 1994 NCAA Division I Women's Soccer Tournament was the 13th annual single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of NCAA Division I women's collegiate soccer. The semifinals and championship game were played at Merlo Field in Portland, Oregon during December 1994.

References

  1. "Soccer/Lacrosse Stadium". ramsclub.com. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  2. https://247sports.com/Article/Matthew-Tago-commits-to-UCLA-Bruins-105635139
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 http://www.tarheelblue.com/facilities/unc-fetzer-field.html
  4. http://www.tarheelblue.com/sports/w-soccer/mtt/dorrance_anson00.html
  5. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on April 24, 2013. Retrieved April 27, 2013.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  6. http://www.tarheelblue.com/genrel/020902aaa.html
  7. Jerry’s Peters (July 4, 2013). "Ranking the 10 Greatest Female Soccer Players in History". Bleacher Report . Retrieved August 18, 2019.
  8. 1 2 3 http://www.tarheelblue.com/facilities/unc-mccaskill-soccercenter.html
  9. "UNC women's lacrosse earns No. 3 seed in NCAA, will host Virginia in opening round". DailyTarHeel.com. Retrieved March 27, 2017.
  10. "The Daily Tar Heel". DailyTarHeel.com. Retrieved March 27, 2017.
Preceded by
UCF Soccer Field
Warren McGuirk Alumni Stadium
Method Road Soccer Stadium
Merlo Field
Host of the Women's College Cup
1984
1988
1990–1993
1995
Succeeded by
George Mason Stadium
Method Road Soccer Stadium
Merlo Field
Buck Shaw Stadium